Solved XP machine at work missing file

Gigabyte / Ep43-ud3l
November 2, 2011 at 20:58:02
Specs: XP Professional, P4/500MB
At work there is an XP machine that is reporting it cannot boot due to a missing or corrupted file. Going entirely from memory it was something like:
Windows/System32/Config.... (I am not exactly sure right now, but you get the general idea)
After trying the XP install disk and several repair options. One required a floppy disk that we do not have, and the other leads to a command line repair that I am not comfortable enough proceeding with since both apparent boot fixing options warn about erasing current settings (I do not want to make it difficult to log back onto the server or POS program after).

There is a nearly identical machine purchased at the same time that should have an identical file on it.... Is this a reasonable option: Use a Puppy Linux CD to copy the file from one computer to a flash drive and then replace the corrupted file on the nonworking machine the same way. Or is there another simple way to get this running again.

Specs that I know: Slim desktop system, Pentium 4, XP professional, generic business system, server 2003 network.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#1
November 3, 2011 at 00:34:44
✔ Best Answer
It is the registry that is corrupted, & because each registry is different on different machines you cannot just copy one over. You need to a saved copy from within the poorly machine so you have two options:

Use the repair console as described HERE - it does involve a bit of command-line stuff, but nothing major. Check this link anyway as it tells you the locations of the files you need to replace.

Alternatively you can use a live Linux disk (Your Puppy, Ubuntu or Kaspersky Rescue disk for example) - boot from that & then use its file manager to replace the corrupted file(s) from the repair folder, make sure you rename the original files before copying the repair ones over, just in case.

Note that it is worth doing all 4 registry files whilst you are there as it's not uncommon to have more than one of the files corrupted.

After all of this, do a scan of your harddrive for errors - something must have caused the problem in the first place.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd


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#2
November 3, 2011 at 04:47:34
This warning is on the article:
Warning Do not use the procedure that is described in this article if your computer has an OEM-installed operating system. The system hive on OEM installations creates passwords and user accounts that did not exist previously. If you use the procedure that is described in this article, you may not be able to log back into the recovery console to restore the original registry hives.
and I have to assume that this was an OEM installation

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
November 3, 2011 at 06:01:02
That's why you do the back-up beforehand, so you can revert to it if necessary. I've done the procedure a number of times on different machines and, touch wood, haven't had any problems, even on oem machines.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd


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#4
November 3, 2011 at 18:35:21
Thank you for the link and the advice, the process was tedious but worked fine in the end.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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