wireless network deleting

January 30, 2011 at 09:19:37
Specs: Windows XP
I have a wireless router. Recently several other network connections have appeared on my system (belkin54g and linksys) which have very poor signal strength. While i am on the net using my usual connection, I get bumped off the net and get reconnected using one of the two other weaker connections. I want to know how to delete these connections so they are completely off of my computer. Help!



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#1
January 30, 2011 at 09:48:27
Obviously someone close by has their wireless signal unprotected. I don't think you can stop your wireless from detecting them, but you should have your own wireless signal setup as the primary. Do you at least have a WEP setup with a 10-digit passkey? WPA is more secure & can use a phrase which is much harder to crack. Once you set it up & saved as a profile, your wireless adapter should always look for that signal 1st.

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#2
January 30, 2011 at 11:05:23
I DO HAVE MY OWN WIRELESS ROUTER SET UP AS MY PRIMARY WITH NO OTHER WIRELESS ROUTER LISTED ON THE PROPERTY SCREEN, HOWEVER THERE IS A LIST OF AVAILABLE NETWORKS THAT ARE NOT LISTED IN THE NETWORK CONNECTION PROPETIES SCREEN THIS IS WHAT KEEPS KNOCKING ME OFF MY WIRELESS CONNECTION, I WOULD LIKE TO REMOVE THESE INDIVIDUALLY THEY ONLY SHOW UP UNDER WIRELESS CONNECTIONS, OUR WIRELESS ROUTER IS SET UP AS UNPROTECTED I HAVE TRIED TO SET UP A PROTECTED NETWORK BUT NOT BEEN SUCESSFUL WITH THIS, DO YOU THINK THAT A PROTECTED NETWORK WOULD KEEP ME FROM BEING DISCONNECTED WITH MY CONNECTION?

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#3
January 30, 2011 at 14:13:33
Your Capitals Lock key has got stuck.

We all live on a ball.


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#4
January 30, 2011 at 14:50:16
Typing in a post on the web in all capital letters is considered to be the same as if you were shouting, and very rude !

Your losing your wireless connection to the internet probably has nothing to do with the other wireless routers that are within range of your wireless adapter. Wireless connections are a lot less reliable than wired connections, especially if they're wireless B or G, or if you do not have a strong signal between your wireless adapter and your router.

Losing the internet connection can also easily be caused by your high speed modem losing it's connection, whether it's built into a combo router/modem or a standalone modem, especially when it's a DSL or ADSL modem. In that case, you can have a strong signal between your wireless adapter and your router, yet it won't connect to the internet, or the connection is poor.
The led on the front of the combo router/modem or the standalone modem that indicates you have a DSL, ADSL, or cable modem high speed internet connection doesn't necessarily go out when the modem has a poor connection or no connection to the internet - in fact it usually stays on. Try re-setting (re-establishing the internet connection) on the combo router/modem or the standalone modem if your internet connection is poor or dead.
- If it has a switch, switch it off, switch it on.
- If it has no switch, unplug the power adapter's cord from the router/modem or the standalone modem at the device (pull on the plug, not the cord), plug it back in.
- in either case, WAIT a short while until the led indicating you have an internet connection lights up.
(If you have to wait a longer time until the led lights up, you probably have a DSL or ADSL high speed modem - in that case, there are things you could do and be made aware of to possibly improve the situation.)

You can only connect to the internet one way at a time from one computer - via a wireless network connection or a wired network connection.
Unplug any network cable to the router from your computer when you're trying to connect wirelessly; disable the wireless connection when you're trying to connect via a wired connection.
If the computer was running Windows when you did that, Restart the computer before trying to connect to the internet.
........

If your wireless connection has no security protecting it, then by default, any wireless device that can pick up your router's signal strong enough can access your computer wirelessly.
(if the signal between your wireless adapter and their router is too weak, then they probably can't access your system, because the signal between their wireless adapter and your router is probably too weak).

If you DO NOT already know how to access your router's configuration settings...
Tell us the model and revision or version of your router, and which country you bought it in.

It's much easier to set up a Secure wireless connection if you
- DO NOT use the wireless settings program that came with the wireless adapter's software,
- use XP's built in Wireless Zero program instead
- set up the security in the router's configuration first.

DO NOT use the wireless settings program that came with the wireless adapter's software.
- if you can choose to install only the drivers for the wireless adapter when you install it's software, then do that.
- if there is a separate listing for the wireless settings program in Add or Remove Programs, Un-install it.
- if you can't do either of those things, if the wireless settings program has a line that loads it as a Startup program, then disable that line.
Start - Run - type: msconfig (press Enter)
Click on the Startup tab - look for a line that loads the wireless settings program.
Click on the checkmark at the beginning of the line to stop it from loading

If you made a change in msconfig you will be asked to Restart the computer - do that, then, or later.
The next time you boot the computer, a System Configuration window will pop up.
Click on the small box on the left of it to insert a checkmark to prevent it popping up again - click OK.
......

Access the router's configuration settings.
Set the type of security, and type in a code, or have it generate a random code. Copy down the type of security and the code.

If you can't access the router wirelessly, then you must either access it from another computer on the same local network that can already access it, or you must connect a network cable between the subject computer's wired network adapter port and a port other than WAN on the router.

Have Windows (built in Wireless Zero program) search for available wireless connections.
Choose the one that has the SSID of your router, click on Connect.
Choose the type of security, and type in the code.
The Wireless Zero program will automatically find other needed settings.
That's it.


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