Windows sees my files but my linux file manager doesn't

January 13, 2014 at 08:55:18
Specs: Windows XP
I am currently working on a raid volume that is presenting with the hal.dll file missing error. Nothing I've done has worked to fix this error (hitman kickstart, kaspersky restore, etc). I decided to clone the drive and see if I could play with it externally outside of the raid volume constraints.

After cloning the disc, when viewing where the boot.ini file was pointed, I noticed it was point to the WINNT file as this machine is an XP upgrade from ME. This is where my problem arises.

I can see the entire winnt folder, including my "missing files", from my win7 machine I use for diagnosis and bench testing, but when I try to insert the master raid drive back into the original volume and repair it using either kaspersky restore or another linux program pre-boot, neither program's file manager is registering ANYTHING inside the winnt folder. 0.00 Mbs, 0 files....

I've never seen this before and am at a complete loss as to whether this is corrupted or what


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#1
January 13, 2014 at 08:58:03
You don't say which RAID controller you are using, but I'm guessing you haven't installed the appropriate modules for Linux. As you have a means to access the missing files I think you need to save them elsewhere, rebuild your array and restore the files.

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#2
January 13, 2014 at 09:19:32
Thanks for the tip, I was afraid I would have to wipe the volume and start from new... I don't believe the RAID modules within linux should be an issue as I've pre-loaded them before and I can see every other folder within file manager on the drive except for the winnt folder.

I apologize, I don't know the RAID controller offhand as it's the onboard controller for my client's mb. (Small business using a RAID volume to simply back up data, nothing elaborate)


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#3
January 13, 2014 at 09:24:27
Small business making a big mistake if they are using RAID as a backup solution. Whatever advantages RAID may have, providing reliable backups is not one of them.

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#4
January 13, 2014 at 09:50:28
It's a down-time issue for doctors, engineering platforms, etc... basically anything that can't be down for more than five minutes without the business being at a standstill. The ability for them to pull the other drive off the RAID volume if a hard drive fails and be back up two minutes later is invaluable for thier profit line. "backup" was the wrong term, I apologize.

Any other thoughts as to what could cause only my winnt folder (and only my winnt folder) to be invisible to the linux file manager?


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#5
January 13, 2014 at 09:53:21
Oh yes, I agree with that. Exactly the right reason to use RAID. But all too often you see it used as the only "backup" strategy - until someone overwrites (or deletes) a file they didn't intend to.

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#6
January 13, 2014 at 14:47:26

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#7
January 13, 2014 at 15:09:38
Even with a RaId system - to whatever degree/style, I suggest it's wise to have an actual backup as well. At the least to another hard drive, possibly another Raid - simple Mirror system… Perhaps both if really critical stuff…? Some might even advocate optical too - as they can be accessed/read immediately on any compatible system…?

Having lost a drive in simple mirror system a few months back… (it was relatively quickly and easily restored - with a wee bit of help from Qnaps support) I now have that mirror system also backed up on a single external;/USB drive… This approach will allow access to most of what's on the mirror system, (should it become temporarily and completely inaccessible again - as was mine previously).


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