Solved Windows DOS command to enable onboard graphic

June 4, 2011 at 06:15:50
Specs: Windows XP
Is there a windows based DOS command to enable on-board graphics?
i.e. C:\Windows\ ... then what ??
This is for Windows XP.

See More: Windows DOS command to enable onboard graphic

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✔ Best Answer
June 4, 2011 at 09:03:07
It is unlikely that the graphics card cannot handle the graphics that Windows uses providing the graphics card is working correctly and the correct drivers are installed.

You said you added a graphics card and all you get is green squiggles. Did you disable the on-board graphics in the BIOS and move the cable to the new graphics card. If you just left installed the graphics card and changed nothing ion the BIOS then Windows is probably getting confused as to which graphics ard it is supposed to be using. If the on-board is enabled and the monitor is connected to it remove the add on card and start again.

Whenever you have graphics problems the first thing to do is to boot into safe mode and see if that works. Safe Mode uses a low res graphics format that all graphics cards can handle, even without drivers installed.

Stuart



#1
June 4, 2011 at 06:18:22
Do you have an add in graphics card too? If so, just remove it and reconnect the monitor to the integrated graphics.

Explain what you are hoping to accomplish.


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#2
June 4, 2011 at 07:02:50
I had an added in graphics card but it failed (it only displays green squiggles and blocks). The onboard graphics had previously been been disabled.
The computer now boots up and displaces the start-up sequence OK using the onboard graphics until the Windows logo comes up. After a few moments, the screen then goes blank. It appears the Windows XP configuration with the setting of "disabled onboard graphics" overrides the BIOS settings.
I have tried with and without the added in graphics card. I've also tried setting the BIOS to force the use of the onboards graphics but it appears the Windows system overrides this when the Windows system starts up.
So... I'm trying to change the Windows XP system settings via C:\Windows commands to re-enable the on-board graphics.
Hope you can help.
Thanks, PeeWee.

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#3
June 4, 2011 at 07:28:58
You are misunderstanding how graphics card work. It ether uses the on-board graphics all the time or the plug in card all the time, it cannot switch one between the other while the system is running, not least of all because each will have its own socket for the monitor to plug into.

The start up sequence will use whatever graphics card is enabled and the monitor is plugged into. It appear to work all right because it is using a relatively simple text mode, or low res graphics. As soon as Windows start to load and switches into high res graphics, it fails.

To enable the on board graphics boot into the BIOS and enable the on board there and change the monitor cable to the on board socket. There is no Windows command that I know of the will enable/disable on-board graphics. It would almost certainly require \ re-boot if it did so you might as well do it in the BIOS..

Stuart


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#4
June 4, 2011 at 08:44:48
Thanks Stuart,
I have the On-board graphics enabled and the VGA cable connected from the on-board socket to the screen. As mentioned this displayed properly during the start up but the screen goes blank shortly after the Windows logo runs. If I understand correctly, this is because as Windows starts it switches into high res graphics which the on-board graphics can't handle?
How can I change the Windows output to a lower resolution output that can be displayed ? (I can't access any of the Windows menus because the screen goes blank immediately after the start-up windows logo runs).
Thanks again, PeeWee.

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#5
June 4, 2011 at 09:03:07
✔ Best Answer
It is unlikely that the graphics card cannot handle the graphics that Windows uses providing the graphics card is working correctly and the correct drivers are installed.

You said you added a graphics card and all you get is green squiggles. Did you disable the on-board graphics in the BIOS and move the cable to the new graphics card. If you just left installed the graphics card and changed nothing ion the BIOS then Windows is probably getting confused as to which graphics ard it is supposed to be using. If the on-board is enabled and the monitor is connected to it remove the add on card and start again.

Whenever you have graphics problems the first thing to do is to boot into safe mode and see if that works. Safe Mode uses a low res graphics format that all graphics cards can handle, even without drivers installed.

Stuart


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#6
June 4, 2011 at 10:05:54
The added-in graphics card had been in and working fine for several years. It recently failed (I assume) as the screen display was green coarse pixellation and squiggles. I then removed existing graphics and changed the video cable over to the on-board graphics output plug (VGA).
The on-board graphics had previously been disabled using the Windows System menu. So I then used BIOS to enable the on-board graphics. i.e. I set "INIT DISPLAY FIRST" to "Onboard VGA" and set ONBOARD GPU" to "Always Enable".
I then rebooted in NORMAL which produced a normal display until the Windows system start-up logo, after which the screen went completely blank. I have also rebooted in SAFE MODE. This generates a long listing, (entire screen) all with the follow root to a range of files ending in " ... .SYS". i.e.
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\Windows\System32\Drivers\ ..... .SYS
Progress then halts indefinitely (>45 mins so far) with the last line showing: -
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\Windows\System32\Drivers\AVGIDSxx.SYS
Following your advice it appears there may be a more serious problem ...
Cheers, PeeWee

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#7
June 4, 2011 at 10:36:40
The long list if files you get is normal in Safe Mode. It can take some time to work its way through all the necessary files but not 45 mins. The one it freezes on is usually an indicator of where the problem lies.

AVGIDSxx.SYS appears to be part of AVG Anti Virus which could be the root cause of all you problems, especially if you are running AVG 10. That has had lots of problems.

If you cannot boot into Safe Mode then you have little choice but to attempt a repair install. You can do that by booting from your Windows XP CD and once the installation has recognised the existing installation, hit R/ It should then go through the installation routine keeping all our settings. Don't select the first repair option as that will put you into the recovery console which is unlikely to be of much help here.

If that fails then it is probably a complete reinstall.

Stuart


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#8
June 4, 2011 at 10:59:38
You may need to remove the old drivers and then install the correct drivers for the on board. Do that while in Safe mode.

If you are having a problem booting into safe mode (F8 at start up) then you may be using a USB keyboard. Try a PS/2 at leastuntil you can get into the BIOS. Then enable legacy USB support.


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#9
June 4, 2011 at 12:29:19
Thankyou for all the discussion. It has been exceptionally helpful and is extremely appreciated.
The AVG version I have is 9.0.901
I had previously rebooted from my Windows XP CD and tried the Recovery Console however that didn't resolve the problem.
As suggested I have now rebooted and hit R/ (immediately after accepting the EULA). This ran through until it attempted to restart windows at which point it fully froze. I had to hit the reset to restart the computer.
I have now commited to a complete reinstall.
Your advice and support has helped me get to "the last resort" and be confident that I'm doing the right thing. I'll let you know if anything else strange comes up.
Thanks once again.
Regards,
PeeWee



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