Window XP/Dos

Dell Inspiron 8200 notebook
February 11, 2010 at 12:30:31
Specs: Windows XP, 1GB
non of my comands work on dos. When I type IPCONFIG/ALL
The response is 'ipconfig/all' is not recognized as an internal or external cammand, operable program or batch file


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#1
February 11, 2010 at 12:48:22
Put a space between the g and /.

Stuart


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#2
February 11, 2010 at 13:30:26
Microsoft updated the command so they work either way now.

DTI6688
You lost your path to the system32 folder which is why this is not working.

You can test this by doing the following;
go to a cmd prompt
type cd\windows
type cd system32
now type ipconfig /all

It should work.

You can type "path" without the "" and you will see c:\windows\system32 is not listed.

Follow this article to correct the path statement in the environmental varibles

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310519


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#3
February 11, 2010 at 13:34:34
Thank you for the reply but that still gives the same result. It is. It repsonds the same for all commands except LDIR

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Related Solutions

#4
February 11, 2010 at 13:36:43
There is no command prompt command ldir [mistype?]
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/...

go cd\windows\system32 and do a dir ipconfig.exe
does the file exist?


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#5
February 11, 2010 at 14:34:55
How are you going about it? Go to Start > Run, type in CMD, click OK, then type in your command?

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#6
February 11, 2010 at 14:38:23
I had a similar problem a while back.
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

I've since installed XP MCE 2005 from scratch on that computer, and I have it at my place presently.
.........

ipconfig /all does NOT display properly if you type it in the Run box in Windows.
All you see is a black window quickly open and close - the info is displayed but nearly immediately you go back to Windows - you can't read it unless you're Superman.
You have to go to cmd mode first in order for what is displayed to remain on the screen.
E.g. Run - type: cmd
type: ipconfig /all

There are other commands that only display properly in cmd mode.
......


If you're wondering what the default path is.....

E.g. in cmd mode
type: path
I see:
PATH=C:\Windows\system32;C:\Windows;C:\Windows\system32\Wbem;........
Those are probably the default minimum folders. Other folders are listed after that according to whether a program added a folder to the path when it's software was installed. Each folder location must have a semicolon at the end of it, except the last one in the list.
Sometimes XP does not see itself as being installed on C. In that case, the drive letter will be different for at least those default folder locations.
.......

If you type: path
in the Run box in Windows, that doesn't work.

RIGHT click on My Computer - Properties - Advanced - Environmental Variables

You can Edit the path statement that's in the lower box.
click on the path line, then Edit.
Click on the Variable Value box, use the < keyboard key to scroll to the beginning of the line.
NOTE: Click on OK in the small window where you edited the line AND click on OK in the Environmental Variables window, otherwise the change you made does not "stick".

If you're wondering what the default path is.....

Mine shows
%SystemRoot%\System32;%SystemRoot%;%SystemRoot%\System32\Wbem;..........
Those are probably the default minimum folders. Other folders are listed after that according to whether a program added a folder to the path when it's software was installed. Each folder location must have a semicolon at the end of it, except the last one in the list.
.........

To have a record of the existing path from cmd mode, you could do this.

Run: cmd
type: md C:\Junk
type: path > C:\Junk\path.txt

That will make a text file path.txt that has the existing complete cmd mode path statement in it, in C:\Junk.
.......

If you need to temporarily add a folder to the path statement in cmd mode,
typing: path /? there reveals....

"Including %PATH% in the new path setting causes the old path to be appended to the new setting."

E.g.
type: path %PATH%;C:\folder

will add ;C:\folder to the end of the path statement, but C:\folder should actually exist.

If you type: path
again before leaving CMD mode, you will see that ;C:\folder is at the end of the path statement.

However, when you exit cmd mode, go back in, type path, the ;C:\folder is gone.
(If you typed something wrong and ended up with an oddball path statement, simply go out of cmd mode, go back in - the original path is restored.)
.....

Similarly....

E.g.
type: path C:\folder2;%PATH%

will add C:\folder2; to the beginning of the path statement, but C:\folder2 should actually exist.

If you type: path
again before leaving CMD mode, you will see that C:\folder2; is at the beginning of the path statement.

However, when you exit cmd mode, go back in, type path, the C:\folder2; is gone.
(If you typed something wrong and ended up with an oddball path statement, simply go out of cmd mode, go back in - the original path is restored.)
......

Edits you make to the path statement in Windows will show up in the path statement in cmd mode.

The %SystemRoot%\System32;%SystemRoot%;%SystemRoot%\System32\Wbem;......
path line is shown in at least two places in the registry.

My Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Control\Session Manager\Environment

My Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Environment



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