why dont i get a windows cd with my netbook?

Acer incorporated / Acer aspire one zg5
January 23, 2011 at 14:51:03
Specs: Windows XP
I bought an acer aspire one (aoa 150) and the windows is in the partition, but nowhere else. I sent the pc to repair an lcd problem (which they didnt cure) and they changed the original hard drive with a virgin one (no partition, no windows). Now if i get a virus and must format, i have no cd rom (can't boot), no windows cd; what will i do? what can i do?

Please help, any info will be greatly appreciated.

Alejo


See More: why dont i get a windows cd with my netbook?

Report •

#1
January 23, 2011 at 16:31:03
Those problems are common to all netbooks. Personally, I don't know why anyone would buy one. There are plenty of small notebooks that don't cost all that much more & have a CD/DVD burner.

Normally when someone gets a virus, they just remove the virus, not reinstall the OS. But I realize not everyone has the know-how to do that. I'm guessing there's a way to create a disk from the Windows partition that was on the original HDD, but you'd still need an external CD/DVD drive to burn the disk & do the reinstall.

If it's any consolation, many laptops & desktops don't come with a Windows disk. But they do have the files on the hard drive & a utility that can be used to create a recovery disk. The thing is, most people don't bother to create the disk & by the time they need it, it's too late.


Report •

#2
January 23, 2011 at 17:00:17
Does your netbook model have a built in CD or DVD drive ?
If it doesn't, even if the bios Setup can be set to boot from a USB connected drive, you usually cannot install XP from a USB CD or DVD drive because the files on the CD cannot recognize the USB optical drive model.
There is a method of installing XP when you can't get the CD to load Windows, if you're interested - it requires that you have access to another working computer and an inexpensive adapter to connect your drive to the other computer.

You can't run a Repair installation of XP unless you can boot the computer from a CD in an optical drive connected to the same computer. The above method can only install Windows from scratch. If you have files on the hard drive that you do not want to lose, you will need to copy them to elsewhere first, BEFORE you install Windows again. E.g. Even if the operating system will no longer load normally, there are ways of copying data - e.g. a bootable Linux CD may work fine in a USB optical drive


Why did they not supply Recovery CDs ?

See the above, and Acer is an el-cheapo brand (e.g. Emachines computers don't come with them either; they're in the same Acer group), and it's a netbook - there are lots of netbook models of any brand that didn't come with the CDs.

Dell and HP and Compaq laptop and desktop computers that had XP on them usually came with the CDs.

(added) - and, as Mickliq has pointed out, some brand name systems have a program provided by the brand name with which you're supposed to make your own Recovery disks with.

If it had XP Pro or Home on it, and if your netbook model has a built in CD or DVD drive, they should have at least loaded Windows and the drivers for your system on the drive. Phone them up ask ask them why they didn't do that.
If it had an XP MCE version on it, they may not have any disks to install that - that requires that they have an OEM 2 CD set.

You can probably order Recovery disks for your model from somewhere on the Acer web site, if your model is not more than 5 years old or so, and have them shipped to you within a few days. They are usually relatively inexpersive - much cheaper than buying an OEM XP Home CD, the cheapest type you can buy,

OR if you know anyone who has a regular OEM Microsoft XP CD, of the same version, Home or Pro, as on the official Microsoft label that's on the outside of your case, probably on the bottom, you can use that CD to install Windows along with the Product Key that's on the label.

A regular OEM Microsoft XP CD has "For distribution with a new PC only." printed on it, and holograms on the CD.


Report •

#3
January 24, 2011 at 14:06:26
You need to read the owners manual. It will say somewhere (maybe not too clearly) how to recover the unit. You may have to purchase disks too if available even.

Why did it take me over a year to phone in a problem to ATT?


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
January 25, 2011 at 01:15:29
Thanks to everyone, especially Tubesandwires. So, then there are many that dont come with the os cd, in part because its not an easy thing to boot without the cd rom, I would guess. And it seems to be there's a way to do so, which i'd really like to know. Please teach me how. I will make a complete backup these days, and then regularly. If I dont know how to boot this, a terminal virus will terminate my pc as well. I will ship my windows from acer, then.

Thanks again


Report •

#5
January 25, 2011 at 10:22:21
"And it seems to be there's a way to do so, which i'd really like to know. "

You need an appropriate XP CD. See response 2.

Once you have one....

If your netbook model DOES NOT have a built in CD or DVD drive............

See response 3 in this
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...

starting at

This will work for sure....


NOTE that if you don't have and can't borrow a Win 98, 98SE, or ME CD, that there is a valid Product Key you can use with it, then there are obvious links to Dos 7.1 downloads when you scroll down on the pages at that link I pointed to.

If you DO have or can borrow a Win 98, 98SE, or ME CD, that there is a valid Product Key for,
- if you DO have a floppy drive on the other computer but you have no Startup disk floppy and have no access to a working Windows installation of the same version to make one, it can be downloaded off the web , such as from bootdisk.com .
- If you DO NOT have a floppy drive on the other computer (most desktop computers have the floppy data header, even when there is no floppy drive installed in the case - you could borrow a floppy drive and data cable from another computer) , if you boot the computer from the Win 98, 98SE, or ME CD, it initially loads the same things as the Startup floppy disk loads, and you run Fdisk and Format at the prompt before typing Setup at the prompt.
.....

Then see ALL of response 12 in that.
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...

I left out something.

After this step:

" Run Fdisk from the floppy.
Delete all existing partitions.
Make a Primary partition, but DO NOT make it the default maximum size. E.g. a 2 gb partition (2,048mb) is more than big enough for 98SE or ME.
Don't bother making another partition."

You then need to run Format from the floppy on that partition you made.
E.g. type: format C: , press Enter.

NOTE that if the other computer has no FAT32 partitions, then the ONLY partition the floppy disk's Format can find is C, the one on your netbook hard drive - Dos 7.x's, and Win 98's, 98SE's, and ME's Fdisk and Format cannot "see" NTFS partitions. That C drive letter does not refer to the C partition on the other computer if that C partition is NTFS. .

Then you continue on with the directions in response 12.
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...
....

When XP's Setup has completed, you need to install the drivers for your netbook model that are in the downloads for the model on the brand name's web site.
If you like, you could download those and copy them to a flash drive on the other computer before you load XP on your netbook's hard drive - that way you will have the installation files available even if XP has not installed your network adapter drivers when Setup has finished.
DO NOT install any drivers for any of those when New Hardware pops up in Windows ! Run the installation download files after the main desktop screen has fully loaded.

Also see response 14 in that:
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...
You need to install a newer IE version, and install SP3 updates if they were not integrated into the XP CD contents.


Report •

#6
January 25, 2011 at 12:15:51
Excellent then!!! Thanks a lot!!! I hope this works.

Here is the hole thing to do, gathered from the different places. Thanks!

Windows installation guide in pc lacking of cd/dvd drive:

You need an appropriate XP CD. See response 2. Once you have one, If your netbook model DOES NOT have a built in CD or DVD drive:
Install Windows XP without floppy or cd drives. 5 pages. http://www.syschat.com/install-wind... . Requires you get and use an adapter to connect your hard drive to a desktop computer, and some software requirements. Download links 1st post below instructions. The advantage of that is you are running XP's Setup on your own Lifebook p1120 computer.
NOTE that if you don't have and can't borrow a Win 98, 98SE, or ME CD, that there is a valid Product Key you can use with it, then there are obvious links to Dos 7.1 downloads when you scroll down on the pages at that link I pointed to.
In this case you MUST connect the new hard drive to another computer that has a CD drive (that the other computer / operating system recognizes) - either you must get and use an inexpensive adapter as the guy suggests ( I got one for about $12 Canadian - local computer parts places have it for that or less) and connect it internally to a desktop computer, or - you could install your drive in an IDE 2.5" external drive enclosure and connect it via USB to any computer (~$25 and up at local computer parts places if you don't have one - I recommend Vantec). You could use the external drive enclosure for your original drive afterwards. You can do this part either on your computer with it's external floppy drive, or on another computer that has a floppy drive, or use your external floppy drive on another computer.
Boot with a Dos 7.1 bootable floppy (it must have Fdisk, Format, Sys.com, etc. on it), or a Win 98 Startup Disk, or a Win 98SE Startup Disk, or a Win ME Startup Disk. If you haven't made a Win 98 Startup Disk, or a Win 98SE Startup Disk, or a Win ME Startup Disk, you can make one in an existing Windows installation in Control Panel - Add/Remove Programs - Startup disk . The guy left out an important step. You DO NOT use the entire drive's space for the older operating system. You need to install the older operating system on a small partition, at the beginning of the drive, and leave the rest of the drive un-allocated.
Run Fdisk from the floppy. Delete all existing partitions. Make a Primary partition, but DO NOT make it the default maximum size. E.g. a 2 gb partition (2,048mb) is more than big enough for 98SE or ME. Don't bother making another partition.
Now you then need to run Format from the floppy on that partition you made. E.g. type: format C: , press Enter.
NOTE that if the other computer has no FAT32 partitions, then the ONLY partition the floppy disk's Format can find is C, the one on your netbook hard drive - Dos 7.x's, and Win 98's, 98SE's, and ME's Fdisk and Format cannot "see" NTFS partitions. That C drive letter does not refer to the C partition on the other computer if that C partition is NTFS. With the new hard drive connected to a computer with a CD drive the operating system on the computer recognizes.
Boot with the floppy in the legacy or your external floppy drive again, load CD drive support. Install Dos 7.1, or run Setup for 98, or 98SE, or ME on the partition.
- Copy the \I386 folder from Win XP (or 2000) cd onto the laptop hard drive
*probably place this directly on the root of the drive to prevent confusion later.
(only for Dos 7.1; it's built into 98, 98SE, ME)
- find and download smartdrv.exe and copy it to the root directory as well (speeds up dos transfers)
(you may find smardrv.exe is already in the Dos 7.1 installation somewhere -
at the C prompt, type: dir /s smartdrv.exe , press Enter)
*IF you cannot find this file, it is also found on win98 boot disks
Transfer the drive back to your p1120.
Boot the hard drive's Dos 7.1 or 98 or 98SE, or ME operating system.
(only if you installed Dos 7.1)
- run smartdrv.exe (type C:\smartdrv.exe , press Enter, at the command prompt)
( or run it from where ever you found it to be)
- run the 16bit Windows XP installer - type C:\I386\winnt.exe , press Enter, in Dos 7.1,
or run C:\I386\winnt.exe in 98 or 98SE or ME
- now let the laptop sit! Even if it appears to stall, it will continue, some older harddrives do not spin very fast and need time to load (5-10min is not an unreasonable wait
*with smartdrv.exe installed, expect MUCH longer without it!
- follow the Windows installer directions!
(Total time, depending on computer speeds: 1-2hrs - though most of this is waiting for Windows XP to install)
XP or 2000's Setup will detect the un-allocated space on the drive, and you can partition it using NTFS and format it, then Setup will continue.
After XP or 2000's Setup has finished, the next time the computer boots you will have the choice of booting the older operating system, or XP or 2000.
Install the p1120 drivers in XP or 2000.
E.g. available from here: http://driverscollection.com
You can delete the partition the older operating system is on in Disk Management in XP or 2000, then make it a NTFS or FAT or FAT32 partition to store data on, (recommended for a place to backup up important personal data to)
- or - you can delete the older operating system partition and use a third party program, e.g. Partition Logic, to add the unallocated space to the XP or 2000 partition (you can't do that in XP or 2000 itself).
You can then edit boot.ini in XP or 2000 to eliminate the choice of booting from either of 2 operating systems every time you boot.
-------
When XP's Setup has completed, you need to install the drivers for your netbook model that are in the downloads for the model on the brand name's web site.
If you like, you could download those and copy them to a flash drive on the other computer before you load XP on your netbook's hard drive - that way you will have the installation files available even if XP has not installed your network adapter drivers when Setup has finished.
DO NOT install any drivers for any of those when New Hardware pops up in Windows ! Run the installation download files after the main desktop screen has fully loaded.

Also, you need to install a newer IE version, and install SP3 updates if they were not integrated into the XP CD contents.
but I don't have it loaded on any computer, but NOT in IE 6.

XP comes with IE 6.
IE 6 isn't being properly supported by a lot of web pages anymore, in any case. You'll get some nag messages about your IE version not being new enough.

Install IE 8.
NOTE that I think you must have SP3 updates installed BEFORE you install IE 8. See below.
Start up IE 8 - click on a blank area at the top of the page, click on the check mark beside Menu bar to remove the checkmark - the File, Edit, View, etc. line will go away.
.......

If your XP CD does not have SP3 updates included.....

See this:
If your XP CD does not have SP3 updates included, the best time to load them is right after you have installed Windows from scratch, before you have loaded a lot of other software, because you're unlikely to have any problems while installing the SP3 updates, or any problems after they have been installed, in that case.
Don't install anti-malware software before you install the SP3 updates, especially Norton / Symantec products.
It's perfectly safe to access the web before you have anti-malware software installed, for the site for your mboard manufacturer's or brand name system's web site, and the major main chipset maker's web sites, so that you can get drivers, and to access the Microsoft Update page on the Microsoft site to have it Express search for the updates manually - however, don't randomly search for anything on the web until you HAVE installed anti-malware software .
If your CD has SP2 updates included, you only have to install a few things there at the Microsoft Updates page, then the only thing listed is the SP3 updates.
If your CD has SP1 updates included, or no SP updates included, you have to install more things there, and possibly have to go there several times, THEN the only thing listed is the SP3 updates.
After the SP3 updates have been installed, you can have it Express search for more updates there, or just let Automatic Update do that that gradually.


Report •

#7
January 25, 2011 at 21:32:08
Yes that's pretty well it, except that
- you may have a SATA hard drive, not an IDE one, which will require an appropriate adapter
- there are also USB to IDE or to SATA or to combo IDE / SATA adapters, for adapting the the hard drive to connect any computer, as well as the external drive enclosures.
- Simple gender adapters have the advantage that the max data transfer rate is much higher than the max USB data transfer rate.
- If you pay a bit more for an external enclosure that can connect via an eSATA connection and if you can connect to eSATA port on the computer, that has a higher max data transfer rate than the max USB data transfer rate too. .
- some people may need additional instructions for how to use Fdisk and Format in the older operating systems if they haven't used them before.

Report •

Ask Question