Solved USA Today: Homeland Security: Don't Use Internet Explorer

April 29, 2014 at 11:21:33
Specs: Windows XP, Dual Pentium III-S ~1396MHz / 2048MB
From USA Today:

Homeland Security is advising Americans not to use the IE browser until a fix is found for a serious security flaw.

Windows XP, no longer supported by Microsoft, will not likely receive a patch if and/or when one becomes available.

Users of all operating systems including Windows XP, should immediately *consider* switching to an alternate browser, (listed alphabetically, no preference given):

*Chrome, by Google (http://google.com/chrome)
*Firefox, by Mozilla (http://firefox.com)
*Opera (http://opera.com)

http://sdfox7.com


See More: USA Today: Homeland Security: Dont Use Internet Explorer

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✔ Best Answer
May 1, 2014 at 11:21:00
Wow, MS have become really bad at playing their cards. Dumping XP when the latest alternative (Win 8) has been seen as bad news by so many - not brilliant.

The dubiously named update to Win 8.1 (let's call it 8.1.1) has noticeably speeded up my PC and it was already fast before this. Not sure whether the re-emergence of the Start Menu (mooted for August or soon afterwards) might turn out to be too late for a system that has now gotten itself a bad name. Pity because Win 8.1 with the latest update is IMO a very good system.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks



#1
April 29, 2014 at 12:45:44
XP users should use an alternative browser anyway now that XP updates have ceased.

This is included in these two security recommendations (2nd link):

http://www.computing.net/howtos/sho...

http://www.computing.net/howtos/sho...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#2
April 29, 2014 at 21:02:45
There's also the conspiratorial viewpoint: Why would homeland security--one of the agencies spying on us--want our computers more secure thereby making their job harder? Hmmm-m-m? Maybe they already have access to the other browsers.

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#3
April 30, 2014 at 11:25:43
CNET article about Internet Explorer shows Microsoft aware of VML bug as far back as 2006.

Buffer overflow in Internet Explorer vgx.dll (VML flaw)

http://sdfox7.com


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Related Solutions

#4
April 30, 2014 at 11:30:24
We seem to now have a new habit of trumpeting security issues simply because XP is no longer security supported. Fine, I accept that modern systems are more secure but these sort of breaches have been common place, fixed by monthly Windows updates, for as long as I can remember.

Should I assume that poor sales of Windows 8 has absolutely nothing to do with it?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#5
April 30, 2014 at 12:13:21
@Derek

This development with Internet Explorer will make XP users all around the world just a little bit safer.

Using IE on XP was dangerous in the first place, even before Microsoft dropped XP support. Now unsuspecting XP users will know not to use the browser.

I think this is a positive development.

http://sdfox7.com


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#6
April 30, 2014 at 12:46:13
Personally I think that the use of flash without being aware is always silly. It seems like it has been a security hole for quite some time.

edit: Just got my first call for "your computer was flagged as having multiple errors that might be related to the Windows XP issues that have been in the news" I asked them which computer was having the issue, and he said....All of them...(I run with Lubuntu 90% of the time....)
::mike

message edited by mikelinus


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#7
April 30, 2014 at 17:05:50
Again in my links at #1, few people (unless gamers) really need Java. At the very least it should be disabled from browsers. It's not that it is inherently unsafe but if it is not required then it seem pointless giving the hackers yet another way in.

In the right hands XP could be used safely for years but Joe Public is a different matter. I'd bet that few use drop my rights (or similar), which is at least a small step towards the security measures first introduced with Vista and so darned easy to do.

Then there is CryptoPrevent etc etc.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#8
May 1, 2014 at 10:47:20
Microsoft has decided to patch the bug in Windows XP, I'm marking this thread solved.

Kudos to Microsoft for patching the Internet Explorer bug on Windows XP. This will keep the internet just a little safer for all of us.

Internet Explorer Gets Its Security Patch, and So Does Windows XP

http://sdfox7.com

message edited by sdfox 7


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#9
May 1, 2014 at 11:21:00
✔ Best Answer
Wow, MS have become really bad at playing their cards. Dumping XP when the latest alternative (Win 8) has been seen as bad news by so many - not brilliant.

The dubiously named update to Win 8.1 (let's call it 8.1.1) has noticeably speeded up my PC and it was already fast before this. Not sure whether the re-emergence of the Start Menu (mooted for August or soon afterwards) might turn out to be too late for a system that has now gotten itself a bad name. Pity because Win 8.1 with the latest update is IMO a very good system.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#10
May 1, 2014 at 11:59:27
Yeah, this update is a setback to Microsoft's policy of panicking everyone with their 'dropped xp support' so they'll rush out and get windows 8.

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#11
May 1, 2014 at 20:51:55
I think this is the download page for manual installation:

https://technet.microsoft.com/libra...


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#12
May 2, 2014 at 02:04:57
Perhaps M$ may yet see the light and restore support to XP... But then pigs might fly first, or the moon turn blue (it already doth turn red on occasion)..

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#13
May 2, 2014 at 13:15:03
Re #11

Yes indeed that is the right one. The KB number varies with details of your system, as per the table.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#14
May 3, 2014 at 19:22:49
RE: #6, There have been security vulnerabilities since at least Adobe Flash 6.0, the version that shipped with XP.

That means we know Flash has been vulnerable for almost 15 years.

So yes, we can consider that it has been a security hole "for quite some time".

http://sdfox7.com


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