Tried Fixboot, now I can't access my C Drive

Microsoft Windows xp professional w/serv...
May 11, 2010 at 13:20:04
Specs: Windows XP
So I was trying to fix an unmountable boot volume and tried the Fixboot command in the recovery console. Now the C drive comes up as a ten meg partition in explorer filled with corrupt characters. I cannot access any of the data on it. In Disk Management the partition still shows up as a 78gb partition. Is there any way to undo the horrible damage I have done?

See More: Tried Fixboot, now I cant access my C Drive

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#1
May 11, 2010 at 13:24:33
Did you try chkdsk /r?

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#2
May 11, 2010 at 13:26:56
Yes, it gives me this:
The type of the file system is RAW.
Cannot lock current drive.
CHKDSK is not available for RAW drives.

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#3
May 11, 2010 at 13:29:02
All "Fixboot" does is install the boot files onto a partition and makes it bootable. It does not damage the drive like you have described.

You should have more than one partition on your computer and the other partition is where your data is. You will probably need to run CHKDSK as suggested and DISKPART so that you can reset your other partition as bootable.

If you are not sure what you are doing I suggest you get help because if you do not use use DISKPART the right way you could wipe out the partition.

P.S. what lead you to run the FIXBOOT? What happened before you did this that made you think you should? Sounds like your drive may have gone belly up before you started.


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Related Solutions

#4
May 11, 2010 at 13:31:51
fixboot only sets the volume boot pointer and makes no changes to partition tables like you are seeing. Neither does fixmbr. It alters the master boot record.

Your post sends mixed messages. If the system doesn't boot you can't be using its disk managment to view the disk.

I have to conclude you moved the disk to a different system.

Not a good thing to do when dealing with partition table corruption. Different controllers can see the drive slightly differently compounding the drive's condition.

highly advise you return the drive to the original system before you do irrepairable damage.


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#5
May 11, 2010 at 13:36:05
If I return it to the original machine I get "missing operating system". At the moment I am backing up the data on the second partition before I mess with it further.

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#6
May 11, 2010 at 13:40:29
You would run the command fixmbr for no os found.

Proper procedure, once you get the drive back into the system, is to do a repair install if fixmbr and fixboot don't work. This will keep the data and programs as they are but update the boot and system files. You will need to do all the service packs and updates again since you are at install defaults.

Key here is that the repair install sees the windows install it needs to repair. If no install is found your drive's partition table or the drive itself is hosed.

Next step would be to download the drive manufacturers utilities and run the diagnostics on the drive. If those tests pass then you can try an undelete/partition recovery software.


BTW fixboot copies no files. There is no MS utility except a repair install/manual copy that will restore the boot files ntldr/ntdetect


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#7
May 11, 2010 at 14:12:02
I wonder if the 10gb partition 'used to be' a hidden recovery image, and you somehow un-hid it. If all else fails, you might want to look into 'how to hide a partition'.

The three most important things in computing:
1. Backups, 2. Backups and 3. Backups.


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#8
May 11, 2010 at 14:17:47
It's a 10mb partition, not a 10gb.

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#9
May 11, 2010 at 14:28:55
Try using testdisk. Read the tutorial thoroughly first. Get it at the link below.

http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/Test...


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#10
May 11, 2010 at 14:33:53
Oops, one of these days I gotta learn how to read.
But my suggestion to hide the partition, might still be valid. If it's being picked up as the C: drive, that's not good.

Or maybe just delete the partition. Just be careful to delete the first one, not the C: drive partition. :-)

The three most important things in computing:
1. Backups, 2. Backups and 3. Backups.


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#11
May 11, 2010 at 15:04:43
Oh, wow I did not realize you took the drive from another system. Yes you have to put the drive back in the old system, backup the files and reformat it when you put it in the new system.

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#12
May 11, 2010 at 15:10:48
hopefully a reformat won't be necessary.

Not uncommon for XP install to leave a 8mb unpartitioned space at the end of the drive. Perhaps this is what Dezrustrian saw.

I would suggest not messing with any partitions or you could render recovery impossible.


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#13
May 11, 2010 at 15:20:19
From what was described, it's a 10mb partition. at the front of the drive.
I assume he must have mistakenly created a partition in the 10mb unallocated space.

The three most important things in computing:
1. Backups, 2. Backups and 3. Backups.


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#14
May 11, 2010 at 15:33:19
Windows automatically creates a 8/10mb partition when you partition and format using WinXP CD. It has a use, but I cant' recall what, and don't have time right now to find out.

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#15
May 11, 2010 at 18:12:01
I seem to recall it was reserved for backup/expanded mft info but that was one of those obscure-read-too-many-pieces-of-information info.

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#16
May 11, 2010 at 19:48:52
I believe the 'unallocated' space at the beginning of the disk is the size of one cylinder (usually about 7.8mb). I think this is done to put the partition on a cylinder boundary.

The three most important things in computing:
1. Backups, 2. Backups and 3. Backups.


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