Solved System will not connect to the internet (XP). Changed cable

Compaq / Er917aa-aba sr1817cl na62...
January 10, 2014 at 07:59:59
Specs: Windows XP, 1.989 GHz / 446 MB
Changed cable and swapped spaces on the modem. Reset modem and router. Plugged another system into the router space that the XP system was connected and it connected just fine. Any suggestions would be appreciated. This started suddenly after having worked correctly for some time.

GRANDPA


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✔ Best Answer
January 12, 2014 at 09:33:10
You'll never guess what I discovered! After my last post last night, I searched sites and forums for hours. I eventually came across a comment that solved my problem. As you mentioned, it could possibly be something as simply as disabeling and reenabling. Well that isn't what did it, but what worked was just about as simple. Turned out that the Ethernet plug on the computer was electrically locked. The cure was....Shut down the system...unplug the power cord...hold the start/power switch down for 15 seconds-Which completely discharges the system....plug the power cord back in...push the power switch to reboot. That did the trick!

You just never know do you.

Thanks for all your time and suggestions.

GRANDPA



#1
January 10, 2014 at 08:26:14
If you look at the device manager information/display - specifically the network adapters - anything showing next to them - a Yellow exclamation mark etc?

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/283658

discusses how to get to it in XP.

I'm not entirely clear which model Compaq(?) you have, as the information in the "tag" at the top is not in a format/style I recognise. Usually a little less complicated than that? Perhaps post the actual model etc. as on the case itself - maybe underneath?


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#2
January 10, 2014 at 08:50:54
Certainly...The model is hp pavillion a750e. There is nothing showing beside any of the network devices. There is a red x across the local network connection listed.

GRANDPA


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#3
January 10, 2014 at 11:55:46
That red x means it not working; possibly no-longer correctly configured…

If you run the: ipconfig /all command in a dos box you will generate al the information there is at present regarding any/all possible connections (wifi and cat-5/ethernet).

Open the Start button (bottom left) and then click on "run"

and in the box type:

cmd - and then press Enter.

In the dos box that opens type:

ipconfig /all (note the space between ipconfig and /all)

Copy (to here) what it shows?

Incidentally can you connect via wifi - even though cat-5 isn't working?

Also it may be a simple re-enable the network connection; routine rather than anything "serious"…

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/...

from the hp support area discusses this a little… Possibly it will resolve it for you?

message edited by trvlr


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Related Solutions

#4
January 10, 2014 at 13:35:52
Host Name = BACKUP
Primary Dns Suffix =
Node Type = Hybrid
IP Routing Enabled= No
WINS Proxy Enabled = No
Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
Media State = Media Disconnection
Description = SiS 900-Based PCI Fast Ethernet Adapter
Physical Address = 00-11-2F-7D-31-B3

GRANDPA


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#5
January 10, 2014 at 15:36:34
mmm - You appear not to have a network adapter installed, or at least enabled… Possibly the drivers have been disabled - even deleted (somehow), as the information you posted shows the card is actually there (its physical address is given)?

*******
This is a typical ipconfig /all - actually from my elderly Acer Aspire (running XP).

Windows IP Configuration

Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : acer
Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Unknown
IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : Home

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : Home
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Broadcom NetLink (TM) Gigabit Ethernet
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-C0-9F-BE-10-34
Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.12
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1
DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1
DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1
Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : 10 January 2014 19:52:59
Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : 11 January 2014 19:52:59

Ethernet adapter Wireless Network Connection:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) PRO/Wireless 2200BG Network
Connection
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-12-F0-D7-21-8E

**********
I think I covered re-install/re-enable in the links I sent above…

These two may be a little simpler/easier to follow:

http://www.ehow.com/how_5110439_uni...

http://www.ehow.co.uk/how_6086188_r...

Some will suggest you reboot after disabling the network adapter; certainly after actually "uninstalling" it. This (presuming of course it's still "physically" installed) as Windows will automatically find it (when it boots up) and re-install it (its drivers). Some will say why bother with the reboot; just re-install/re-enable after disabling etc. first…?

If the above don't resolve it all then, either the adapter is faulty, or you "may" have "a nasty" present.. I have seen a reference elsewhere (I think it was in an older post in these forums) that there is wee nasty that produces the problems you have; it disables the adapter at least...

Normally it wouldn't hurt to check the adapter is securely installed too - if it's an actual plug-in card; but your appears to be an on-board adapter...

These links are to the whole manual, and quick setup/connect guide...

http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manua...

http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manua...

message edited by trvlr


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#6
January 10, 2014 at 16:00:53
You have been so kind to share so much info. and time for my problem. I am going to give it a rest and study the links you just sent. I didn't shut down and reboot after disabling but I did after re-enabling. I'll try that but it almost sound too simple....I'm never that lucky! Is it possible that we could simply be dealing with an Ethernet plug in that suddenly went bad? I'll check back with you tomorrow. Again, thank you so very much.

GRANDPA


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#7
January 12, 2014 at 09:33:10
✔ Best Answer
You'll never guess what I discovered! After my last post last night, I searched sites and forums for hours. I eventually came across a comment that solved my problem. As you mentioned, it could possibly be something as simply as disabeling and reenabling. Well that isn't what did it, but what worked was just about as simple. Turned out that the Ethernet plug on the computer was electrically locked. The cure was....Shut down the system...unplug the power cord...hold the start/power switch down for 15 seconds-Which completely discharges the system....plug the power cord back in...push the power switch to reboot. That did the trick!

You just never know do you.

Thanks for all your time and suggestions.

GRANDPA


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#8
January 12, 2014 at 10:35:05
That does a ring a bell - as Derek has suggested the power down - remover power cord etc… and hold the on/off switch for a 10-15 seconds…; often for startup problems (if I remember correctly). Usually been applied to laptops for the most part - but no reason not apply to a desk top as well.

It would actually be even better to also remove a battery too if applying this "fix" to a laptop.

Sometimes the simplest is the best cure…

Thank you posting back - another tip to add to the list of "phyxes".


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#9
January 12, 2014 at 15:43:20
Just every now and then that trick comes up trumps (despite me once being quite sceptical). Yes indeed, on laptops your remove the battery too.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#10
January 12, 2014 at 16:48:15
Oddly... It's got roots I think in the problem of memory leak which has plagued $ word versions from day one... Open and close Word a few times and you start to run out available RAM...

Seems that Word doesn't release all the memory it uses, seems to leave a few things behind... At least that's how it was explained to me an age ago... Solution - when you began to notice your computer was really taking its time... Was to close down, fully remove "any" power sources (batteries include if a laptop); then let it sit for minute or so; and/or also press the on power switch as well... When power restored... System would invariably be much improved and system resources reflecting it too... As far as I know the issue has never been fully resolved...

message edited by trvlr


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#11
January 12, 2014 at 18:54:32
"got roots I think in the problem of memory leak

Maybe but I have to admit I'm really not sure about that. It's certainly a job to get a proper handle on which situations it might fix - I tend to use intuition which is none too reliable. There is also the "well it's easy to try anyhow" syndrome.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#12
January 13, 2014 at 03:00:14
Mmm I'm not entirely sure either about the "roots" - although the similairity is tempting...

Often I find "intuiion" a usful sense to heed; can take one in the right direction... (most of the time...)

And "try this 'cos it won't hurt to" is a very useful ad hoc toolbox item... Number of occasions it can/does work is likely legion...


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