Solved switching ISP, want to transfer old emails to a web-based

Shuttle / Mv42
May 15, 2016 at 09:35:57
Specs: Windows XP, P4 1.8GHz/2.0 Gigs
I'm ditching Verizon/Frontier. Frontier is upping the cost, so I'm going back to Time Warner Cable for our services. The tech arrived Friday, handled the transfer of equipment (modem, stb, phone connection). Now, I'm still getting mail at my old address, tied to Verizon.net. My new ISP mail addy is connected to TWC.com. I assume that the emails coming to my old address will cease whenever Frontier discovers I've not made any payments to them since the change.

Anyhow, I've been told that using an ISP related email address is not ideal, since it ties me to the ISP, as well as using Microsoft Outlook Express 6 as a client. I'm still using XP Pro, SP3 (using a script blocker, as well as having abandoned Adobe Flash, for increased security). Thinking of building a linux box soon, for more security, and more lean speed. At present, it's taking up to a minute and a half just to load Firefox, not sure why.

So, I want to migrate all my old email from my computer to a gmail server, and start using that as my primary email address, so that if anything goes down (computer, isp, etc.), I'll still have access to my emails. (Of course, the email accessed through the internet rather than locally will be a bit slower to access, causing even more frustration, I suppose).

I read some things, like setting the gmail to "IMAP", and putting that gmail addy into Outlook, on my local machine, somehow. I just can't seem to get it right, since I'm using OE6, from 2004, and the example was using Microsoft Outlook 2007, which has somewhat different look to it.

I'm lost, so I'm coming here for help. Otherwise, I figure I'll just phone for tech help from TWC. Maybe they have someone that can figure it out, since they're my new ISP.

Any suggestions?

message edited by OldSchool


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✔ Best Answer
May 15, 2016 at 14:43:46
These are just three discussions that considers a situation similar to yours... Possibly they may give you an inkling on how to go about it all in your situation?

http://tinyurl.com/h2dd7sj

http://tinyurl.com/jyb5nlj

http://tinyurl.com/9ncmut8

I found them via the dreaded Google trawl - using the search term/string:

transfer emails from isp account to a gmail account

The list of responses is quite interesting and informative...



#1
May 15, 2016 at 12:41:26
Perhaps simply email them all (this in you current in/out boxes) to your "new"address; forward them or or similar?

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#2
May 15, 2016 at 13:44:36
In addition, configure the old and the new E-Mail-account in your mail client to use IMAP.
After that, you can mark all e-mails from the old email account and move them to your new account by using drag an drop.

And yes, never use an email account from your ISP, cause the ISP may change several times.

Better use an independent email provider like google, gmx or whatever.


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#3
May 15, 2016 at 14:23:58
"In addition, configure the old and the new E-Mail-account in your mail client to use IMAP.
After that, you can mark all e-mails from the old email account and move them to your new account by using drag an drop."

Yes, this is what I have read. But I get stalled during the configuration process, due to the fact that the only sample I found through google was from someone using MS Outlook 2007. I have MS OE6, from 2004, which has a somewhat different looking menu. I'm not smart enough to figure out the difference.

I did manage to enable IMAP on the gmail acct I want to shuffle my old emails to. I just haven't figured out the setup for OE6. Somehow I've got to configure OE6 to recognize the gmail address, and there are steps in doing that that I don't understand, due to the difference in navigating OE6 from the sample I saw using MS Outlook 2007.

The primary reason I want to save my emails to a more resilient client is because my computer at times acts like it might just quit on me, at which time I would have lost all my emails, if that were to happen. I'm a member of a couple of groups that send me mail through that address, and I want to save all the posts sent and received from those groups.

Going one by one is going to be VERY tedious, if I have to do it piecemeal. I read somewhere that when transferring mail from one client to the other, one should not overtax the process by trying to transfer too much mail at one time, say, over 50 emails or so. I've got hundreds, if not thousands. I'd rather not just abandon it all, since it would require some re-addressing of some issues that have already been addressed. I'm not sure if the groups have archived their mail somewhere for future reference, or not.

I figure I'll try limiting my google searches to a certain time period, say, sometime before the version of Outlook Express I have (6) expired. Maybe someone back then had the same problem.

I'm having a bad brain day.

I'm even thinking, should I configure things to get particular emails through the ISP, direct to my OE6, and others, to the more resilient and reliable web-based clients.

Plus, I'm also thinking,,am I thinking too much? Is this an easier decision than I am making it out to be? Is it a simple transfer and it's over, or is it going to take eons of dragging and dropping?

I do all my banking, buying, paying etc. online. So each of those banks, businesses, groups, etc. have to have a new, reliable address to find me by. This is really confusing, short of a step by step process that I can wrap my head around. I'm not used to configuring, just using.

I think once I get a linux box set up I'll go there, but that's down the road a bit.


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Related Solutions

#4
May 15, 2016 at 14:29:44
I've also read somewhere that you can create a backup for all your emails that exists somewhere in a file, called a "pst" or "pts" or something. I took a look in the Outlook Express folder in programs, and can't seem to find the file.

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#5
May 15, 2016 at 14:43:46
✔ Best Answer
These are just three discussions that considers a situation similar to yours... Possibly they may give you an inkling on how to go about it all in your situation?

http://tinyurl.com/h2dd7sj

http://tinyurl.com/jyb5nlj

http://tinyurl.com/9ncmut8

I found them via the dreaded Google trawl - using the search term/string:

transfer emails from isp account to a gmail account

The list of responses is quite interesting and informative...


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#6
May 15, 2016 at 15:03:58
Incidentally with pop3 system you can leave mail on the server; and will stay there even if you delete it from your local Outlook/Outlook Express access on your computer. There is an option for pop3 (in Outlook settings at least) to allow that.

But (I think) when using IMAP... if you delete it from your Outlook/Outlook Express app inbox then it also goes from the server. As long as it's on your computer (and possibly more than one) then it will also be on the IMAP server. But delete it from your computer (or any other computer) and it goes from all computers and the IMAP server.

Incidentally this discussion :may" be useful anon:

http://tinyurl.com/h3hrh99

A way to safeguard (important) downloaded emails is to duplicate them; i.e. send them to yourself and store in a "special" folder (which you create), or simply move them from the inbox on your computer app to that "special" folder manually.

And of course you can regularly export the contents of the Outlook/Outlook Express inbox (and even the outbox) and save the export both on the hard drive, and also a DVD (even an external hard drive too if possible).


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#7
May 16, 2016 at 01:24:17
Thanks to all.

I did end up calling Time Warner tech support today, and the tech helped me find my "store folder", where all the dbx files were for my entire email collection over the course of several years. The folder is something like 850 megabytes. We copied it to my desktop, and I'm planning on saving it to a thumb drive soon. So much for that. No more anxiety about lost emails.

For the time, I've decided to put aside the ideal, which I haven't decided on for now, and grasp the immediate and practical, by simply adding the new email address given me by Time Warner to my existing email client, MS OE6, and thereby keeping a seamless transition, with no lost mails, while gradually letting my contacts know of the new address. I was told by someone today that the old ISP keeps sending emails to the old address for around 10 days after the ending of service. I also saw somewhere that it may indeed continue for 30 days after. I wouldn't know, personally, having not done it this way before, and for some unknown reason, not having so many contacts as I did when I last switched ISPs.

So I think I'm ready to relax, and call TWC tomorrow and get their email info into my client, Outlook Express. Then I'll have an espresso.


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#8
May 16, 2016 at 02:02:08
Seriously consider making a dvd copy of the contents of the thmb drive - maybe even two. Thumb/flash drives are not the most secure form of storage for critical content; they can and do fail at any time....

Obviously for porting data between two systems etc., knowing content is securely stored elsewhere, flash/thumb drives do have their uses... but again their reliability is not top of the list...

message edited by trvlr


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#9
May 16, 2016 at 07:28:37
One other point to add to # 8 above is that you should use the COPY/PASTE function and NOT the CUT/ Paste option. there is a slight risk of data loss when using cut and paste.

I completely agree with trvlr about the risk of using thumb drives for long term storage.


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#10
May 16, 2016 at 12:22:43
Echoing OtH re'copy ' paste rather than cut 'n paste.

Having once or twice used cut rather than copy and in the process lost the data... copy etc. is much safer... One can always delete the source material later once the "copy" has been made successfully.

I was lucky on those occasions when I lost data in a "cut etc..."; it was already safely duplicated elsewhere... But wise(r) to use copy each time, and delete source kater if needs-be


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#11
May 16, 2016 at 17:30:00
And a further note to inform all that the delete current email folder of all contents is alive and well in IE 6 Lookout Express.

Move your store - everything is gone, old and new.

If either entry below is in your registry
"New Store Folder"
"MoveStore"

here:
[HKEY_USERS\.DEFAULT\Identities\{2AE21A20-0784-11DB-AA4D-D78F89BC006D}\Software\Microsoft\Outlook Express\5.0]

and you restart OE to complete the 'move' to a new store location or try to use this technique to move to an older collection of DBX folders - OE will destroy them. These values are written to the registry when you close OE to mount the new store, it will get both the new files and the old files too unless you are proactive and remove those entries before restarting OE.

Best to have any collections of emails on permanent data off the machine because I've had the monster track down where they came from and it nuked them too.

This 'feature' was broken in IE 5 lookout express so I had no problems mounting what ever year collection I wanted to look at and access using IE 5 with Win98. You think you are safe because you are clearly using IE6 OE and not IE5 OE, you need another thunk. And access to your email backup.

PST files are for OutLook, NOT OutLook Express -- there is a BIG difference between the two, don't forget it. Outlook express email store is a collection of .dbx files in a common folder. Migration of one to the other is purposely broken, just to make life with MS so much more fun.

Lee


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#12
May 16, 2016 at 21:55:48
I'm really getting an education here. Thanks so much.

I think I'll start reading about email clients, and what IMAP, POP3, POP, etc., mean, and how they work, and what are their distinct usefulnesses in contrast to the other types.

I noticed, when I opened up the settings in gmail, to set it up for IMAP (before I decided not to, and re-selected "disabled"), it was just a single radio button. But I also noticed that the both the "POP" and "IMAP" were disabled by default, so I'll have to find out what I've been missing.

There's too much to learn. My head's a mess.


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