Registry Entry for the ICON OPACITY of SUPER-HIDDEN FILES?

April 23, 2016 at 04:30:44
Specs: Windows 2000
I noticed when enabling explorer to display SUPER-HIDDEN files, they appear at (approx) 50% opacity. I want to disable this, but am having trouble locating the registry entry. Any help?

Thank you.


See More: Registry Entry for the ICON OPACITY of SUPER-HIDDEN FILES?

Report •

#1
April 23, 2016 at 08:03:08
The "50% opacity" is done for a reason - so that you know what you're seeing is a hidden/protected OS file. It's sort of a warning. I suggest you leave it be. It's certainly not hurting anything & could possibly prevent you from editing a wrong file & trashing your Windows installation.

Report •

#2
April 23, 2016 at 13:15:58
If by super hidden files you mean "protected operating system files" then you are best advised to keep them hidden, otherwise you often get desktop.ini files showing in user areas such as the desktop.

These files can always be temporarily shown if for some unusual reason you need to.

EDIT:
OK, I now know what you mean by Super Hidden.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Report •

#3
April 23, 2016 at 16:21:59
The opacity is not set by a registry entry, it is a different icon that is lighter in color. There are programs available that let you select different icons than what Windows normally uses and you can change them that way but as others have said, I would not recommend doing so.

Report •

Related Solutions

#4
April 23, 2016 at 17:21:23
Thank you. Separate icons. Why didn't I think of it. Now, where are the icons located? Once I know the directory structure, I can duplicate the icons. Though this seems bizarre. It would be better if I could edit the registry entry that calls the different icons in the first place. And re-direct it to the unfaded icons. Unless you're saying it's hardcoded

Edit: Ah, I see. Microsoft puts it in a DLL. How odd.

message edited by ioiop


Report •

#5
April 23, 2016 at 17:50:53
I don't believe there are any separate dimmed icons. The Windows API provides options for drawing dimmed icons and that is likely how it is done. I don't know any way of disabling this in Windows Explorer.

message edited by LMiller7


Report •

#6
April 23, 2016 at 19:54:40
I don't understand why is this a problem? Microsoft deliberately lightened the color of the hidden files/folders so that they're not accidentally confused with "normal" files & folders. Here's an idea...hide them again & then you won't have to worry about their opaqueness, plus there will be no way you can accidentally delete one of them.

http://www.tenforums.com/attachment...

Why did you change your screen name?

message edited by riider


Report •

#7
April 23, 2016 at 20:08:38
I don't use a computer for anything important so I'd rather just have the files all display the same. I like having access to as much as I can, but it's visually confusing when files are greyed out. I like being able to see as much of the data structure as possible when I'm on a computer.

I didn't feel like guessing the random password I entered so I made a new but similar account so you'd know it was most likely me.


Report •

#8
April 23, 2016 at 20:34:05
Here's a link for making a hidden folder in Win 10. It may even work on XP, I've never tried it. Wouldn't hurt to try or modify though.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=esT...

Regards


Report •

#9
April 25, 2016 at 16:13:14
"it's visually confusing when files are greyed out"

Don't think of it as visually confusing, think of it as a visual warning. If you successfully find a way to change the hidden files/folders to look like normal files/folders, it will eventually come back to bite you.

As Hisenburg said, "tread lightly".

message edited by riider


Report •

#10
April 26, 2016 at 03:45:02
Both normal hidden files and system protected files also looked grayed out. I'm not sure therefore what these don't bother you too.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

Ask Question