Solved Recover or rebuild boot partition?

Dell Optiplex 7010 desktop (3.3 ghz inte...
January 17, 2018 at 16:35:28
Specs: Windows XP, P4 2.6GHZ/PC3200 1.5gig
While cleaning up, what I thought were useless partitions on my Windows XP computer, I have inadvertently deleted the boot partition (the small partition, I think it's called the boot partition.) I am now running on my backup drive, which has two partitions (the screwed up one has only one large partition ~500gig).
I have tried Easeus Partition Recovery Wizard to see if I can recover what I deleted, but it tells me that I have no unallocated space to search. I have also tried the MBR rebuild wizard, which didn't help with rebooting.
Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks,
...... john

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✔ Best Answer
January 23, 2018 at 07:48:48
My route is to maintain the newer version - Windows.0 as the default OS to boot - for now.

Edit the boot.in so that the entry for "Windows" partition(3) becomes partition(1) - the same partition (in fact the only partition..) as Windows.0

Save the changes and reboot - ensuring the time to boot is at least 15seconds - preferably the default 30seconds.

Let the system boot as now - to confirm that Windows.0 is still viable.

Then reboot and manually select the original Windows version (now showing as also in partition(1) - NOT (3) as previously - and see if it will boot OK... You select it course using the arrow keys on the keyboard... and press enter/return to activate the choice.

Presuming it boots OK... (theoretically it ought to...) I'd check contents etc. are OK. Then reboot to reconfirm it boots OK. - again manually. Presuming it does still boot OK then you can set it as default OS to boot.

Maintaining the newer Windows.0 installation as an alternative in the boot-menu is a useful tool/option; as it will allow you access to files in the original version if needs-be; and also permit other trouble-shooting measures in the future - should the occasion arise?

In other words you will have a dual boot Windows (original) and Windows.0(newer basic installation).

Incidentally one of the sub divisions in Scarborough in the 70s was found to be high in radon gas in many of the homes; and also (I think it was the same subdivision) it was discovered to have been a dumping ground for radium based paint (as used on WW2 instruments for the military amongst others). The whole dump had been conveniently "forgotten" (as they say... but don't believe it...) until a group of Ryerson engineering students did some research and homework... concerning another structure in Jarvis St (where those instruments had their dials painted...). It's quite a saga and it meant that the homes affected had to be evacuated... Not sure if they dug out the basements etc. to remove the contamination, or if the homes were demolished and the ground cleared that way? I know of the Jarvis St. building as I one attended a one week course there on (broadcast) camera maintenance for U of T... I worked at Scarborough College shortly after it opened and later for downtown U of T Med Sciences... Scarborough college was initially "out in the wilds"; and there traces of earlier pioneers'/settlers' homes/cabins nearby... "Suburbia" ended at Hwy 48 and Lawrence, and Yonge and Shepard (and also further westward) if not a little lower down in some parts. Jane St was a country road in the late 60s...; and Malton airport (Lester Pearson now?) was a wee small almost miniature parody of what it is now... The 401 was two lanes each way and the Yonge/401 junction wasn't really completed until the early 70's; and even since then it's been evolving all the way along the 401...



#1
January 17, 2018 at 17:07:40
I haven't messed with XP in a while but I don't think it had a separate boot partition.

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#2
January 18, 2018 at 05:14:19
Is there data (personal stuff) on the affected drive which you wouldn't wish to lose; would like to secure/recover?

If so... possibly set about recovering etc. that data first?

See if you can access the drive via a usb adapter on another computer. If that works, then copy your files to another external drive and/or DVD and verify copies are OK of course...

As regards resolving the problem as posted... Quite possibly you deleted a small "hidden" partition created by the manufacturer when the system was commissioned... Not uncommon for that partition to have the necessary partition record etc. within it and also that partition being part of any built-in recovery options. It's been a long while since I played with such systems but I have recollections along that line. Also I think its format was not a standard windows files system...

A possible solution is to run an XP repair installation... and rather than waffle away here about that I suggest you read (carefully) Michael Stevens "excellent" tutorial all about it here:

http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/X...

There are other tutorials around too; but his seems to cover most bases and is well presented...

Note that you do NOT use a recovery console approach; also heed his assorted warnings carefully...

Warning #2 includes a useful option which might be applied initially - if you haven't tried it already?

Your other option is to install XP as a fresh installation - ideally in its own space (partition); but it can likely also be installed alongside the current installation - if the partition and that version is detected during a normal XP installation routine. Key item here is NOT to reformat the drive... (I have several times had two versions of NT or W2K or XP in the same partition; and no problems with any of them. Even mixed NT and W2K in the same partition; but it isn't bog standard normal routine...)

The second installation - however it goes in - will be named as windows if the original was winnt; and visa versa if the original was windows... The repair installation will simply preserve the original name of the original installation.

But first take whatever steps you can to safeguard data on the affected drive - if possible?

Incidentally these may be of help too...

https://helpdeskgeek.com/how-to/fix...

http://computerstepbystep.com/windo...

message edited by trvlr


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#3
January 18, 2018 at 10:05:34
Hi trvlr,
I can access the 'affected' drive. It just won't boot. I have booted the backup drive. It has a large partition and a small one. The small one is about 100 mbs in size with about 10mbs used. I'm nearly sure that the small one is the boot partition.
It contains the following files/directories:
boot.ini
msdos.sys
io.sys
config.sys
ntldr
Ntdetect.com
recycler
system volume information

I'm thinking that maybe I can make a small partition on the affected drive, then somehow add copies of these files to it???
This all came about when I was trying to clean up this drive before installing Linux mint on it, as was discussed in a previous thread. I thought the partitions I was deleting were useless. I don't think so now.
...... john

message edited by shakushinnen


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Related Solutions

#4
January 18, 2018 at 10:29:20
Two approaches which I think may work...

Try the approach in the link I sent you - the helpdeskgeek above; repairing etc. the mbr

If that doesn't work.. start a fresh/new installation (point it to the current partition used by the installation already present) and once it gets to the reboot state - close out the installation, remove the CD and reboot; see if it resolved the situation.

I've done that routine in the past and it worked fine. But try the routine in helpdeskgeek first?

My primary concern is always data security/recovery of course; and if your files are safely copied elsewhere then risks of data loss of course are less a concern.

A parallel installation of XP alongside the current one will preserve data but as always - wise to safeguard files first if possible. The parallel installation (if successful - and it has always been for me) will also include the original one in the boot manager listing created by that parallel installation routine... You end up with a dual boot XP / XP. The original will likely be winnt and the second/newer one windows; or possibly visa versa - depending on what the original version was called of course.

Equally a repair installation as per Michael Stevens ought to resolve it all; but do read the steps carefully and per Michael Stevens advice. The section for that routine is marked XP Repair Install..


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#5
January 18, 2018 at 13:08:12
Hi trvlr ,
I must have done something wrong because it did a fresh installation of windows, leaving my old files intact, which was one of the options I was presented with. I wasn't presented with the options he describes, perhaps because this is an old copy of an installation disk, and is not complete. So, I can now choose to customize the fresh installation, which contains the original data (pictures, music, etc.) or copy the old data to to my backup, and clone it over the new installation. Tell me if you see any other options. I appreciate your help.
...... john

message edited by shakushinnen


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#6
January 18, 2018 at 13:15:31
"I'm thinking that maybe I can make a small partition on the affected drive, then somehow add copies of these files to it??? "
Worth a try.

Another tool to try, if needed.

Lazesoft Windows Recovery Home
http://www.softpedia.com/get/System...
http://www.lazesoft.com/download.html


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#7
January 18, 2018 at 13:48:59
Presumably you now have a boot menu listing the new installation, but not the orginal...?

What is the nameo o the new installation - winnt or windows; and what is the name of the original?

One can manually add the original installation to the boot menu, but one must know the exact location (drive, partition) - aka the ARC path - to do this. Equally one can use a built-in a windows utility to do it for you...

The bootcfg command is a very useful tool... When exectuted/run it scans the entire drive for any versions of the NT family (nt, xp, w2k, etc.) and presents the choice to add them to the boot manager and thus appear on the boot menu...

See if you can follow the M$ kb here as to how to use it:

https://support.microsoft.com/EN-US...

and this article quite possbly even better re' how to use bootcfg

https://neosmart.net/wiki/bootcfg/

message edited by trvlr


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#8
January 18, 2018 at 16:06:09
Hi John,
I tried making the partition, then adding the files to it.
I was able to do it, but it didn't help with the boot problem.
.... john

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#9
January 18, 2018 at 16:27:34
Hi trvlr,
Yes, the boot menu shows Windows XP; but that's not the problem. The problem is that the 'problem' hard drive is now a fresh Windows XP installation, containing the old data. Which is fine; but it will require a lot of customization to get it back to where it was before I screwed it up.
No, I think I'm going to cut my losses here ... copy the data files to my backup; clone the backup to the problem hard drive; and continue with installing Linux in a dual boot format with XP.
Thanks for all your help.
By the way. Before all of this started I was reading about how to install Linux (18.3, cinnamon) so as to be able to dual boot with XP; and one of the tutorials said that I can boot into the Linux DVD, and just follow the installation instruction, which will cover this scenario. Is that your understanding? (I got as far as burning Linux onto a DVD (which does boot) before the 'you know what' hit the fan.)
...... john

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#10
January 19, 2018 at 08:08:13
If you no longer have the "original" windows folder on the drive then what you completed was a repair installation - which overwrote the original windows installation; which is what a repair installation (as per Michael Stevens article) does.

As Michael Stevens remarks, after a repair installation you have to re-apply all updates etc. as the version of XP now present is very likely missing "more than a few..."

If you have both the original windows folder and a the "new" one present on the drive... then the bootcfg routine as in the links in my #7 - specifically then the neosmart link - will discover the original and add it to the (new) boot menu you have now. Thus you then have a dual boot XP (original) and XP (new).

If there is only the new windows installation/folder on the drive - i.e. the olde one hath gone (for the reason as above), then no point to run bootcfg routine. But... the assorted and numerous SP and updates for XP will still need to re-applied...

As you appear to have a full backup of the original installation elsewhere (another drive) then your suggestion to transfer data to that other drive, and then clone that composite to your/the problem drive seems logical? You will of course reformat the problem drive (at least the target/intended partition you can see) prior to completing the cloning process...

As regards dual boot with Linux... I have no personal experience there; although often considered the process. I have a vintage 2005 Acer Aspire (rebuilt a few times...) withXP-Pro on it. It never goes on-line unless essential; doesn't run IE - but does use Firefox. I have thought many times about making it dual boot with something like Ubuntu (which Dell now offer as a standard alternative to windows OS).

Others here often suggest other Linux flavours as some of them are less involved and easier to get familiar with?

Might be useful to post a new thread seeking experienced input re' XP and a Linux dual boot; so as to avoid revisiting/repeating problems which you appear to have initially?

Most Linux variants can be run from a bootable DVD of course; the OS going into RAM only... The resident hard drive is untouched (unless you opt to install Linux to it); and is merely a resource for the RAM based Linux OS. When you close down the computer... the Linux OS disappears, until you run/boot it from a DVD again.

Again re' data security... Ensure that the copy of data to the back up drive is fully accessible - before you erase it from the original/problem drive... Double check... And if there's anything very important (I'm thinking of photos and financial stuff especially) make DVD copies too; and double check those copies as well.


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#11
January 19, 2018 at 10:36:47
Hi trvlr,
Yes, I do have two windows directories, "Windows0" and "Windows". I assume that "Windows0" is the new one since it's only ~800mbs; whereas the "Windows" directory is ~4.6 gigs. I also have two identical listings for Windows XP in my choices of OS' to boot into. Only the first one works, and it boots into the new installation. The second one does what it did since I screwed it up; which is tell me why I can't boot into it. So, maybe there's still hope of saving the original installation?
I read "https://neosmart.net/wiki/bootcfg/" but am not quite sure what to make of it. I assume it tells me how to add a working boot.ini to the faulty installation?? Can you tell which command I should be focusing on?
Thanks again,
..... john

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#12
January 19, 2018 at 12:30:25
Does the boot menu show both versions of XP; i.e. windows & windows0 ?

Is all the data on the problem definitely and safely duplicated elsewhere?


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#13
January 19, 2018 at 15:46:19
Hi trvlr,
The boot menu, the one that pops up when the computer starts, asking which OS I want, shows "Microsoft Windows XP Professional" twice, exactly identical, on two different lines. Msconfig however, shows two entries on two partitions, one with "Windows" and the other with "Windows0". When I ask msconfig to check the 'bootability' of them, it reports that the one with "Windows" will not boot, which is what I found from experience, assuming it's the second "Microsoft Windows XP Professional" entry on the boot menu.
As regards data. As I mentioned before, Windows explorer shows two windows directories, but only one Program directory, which appears to contain all the programs from the original (non bootable) partition. I tried a couple to see if they would launch, and they did.
Other than that, all my folders containing music, pictures, downloads, and various other stuff that I had put on the original partition, seem to be there.
It would seem that if I could boot into the original partition, everything would be tickety-boo, except that I would have some extraneous stuff, namely the Windows0 partition.
I hope this makes some sense. I'm not quite sure what to make of it.
.... john

message edited by shakushinnen


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#14
January 19, 2018 at 16:07:19
You report that Explorer shows two versions of windows; are they both in the same partition - or is one in the original location and the newer one in another partition?

To clarify what us where on the drive at present, it would be useful if you could read the following M$-KB. Presuming you can follow it (and initially it looks quite complicated - but it isn't really...) view the contents of your boot.ini as detailed in the KB. Then post the contents of that boot.ini boot.ini here.

(simply copy and paste it here).

https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb...

That info will clarify exactly what's where on the drive; and may help to re-activate/resurrect fully the original windows installation.

The first paragraph "how to save a backup of the boot.ini" is the part you need to follow at this stage. That paragraph tells you how to access/view the boot.in and of course make a copy of it... which can then be posted here.

And this is another "how to" that deals with just the boot.ini as required at this time.

http://xphelpandsupport.mvps.org/ho...

The goal of this routine (again) at this time is to clearly see what is where on the drive as is. The boot.ini will have that information.

message edited by trvlr


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#15
January 19, 2018 at 16:11:51
shakushinnen, I sent you a PM ( Private message ) It wouldn't accept it on the forum, no idea why.

message edited by Johnw


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#16
January 19, 2018 at 20:18:32
Hi trvlr,
Number of partitions on bad drive ...... I think there is only one. I reported two on the basis of the msconfig's boot.ini screen, which shows two operating systems, and identifies them as different partitions. But Easeus shows only one partition.
Alright, here's the content of boot.ini
[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)\WINDOWS.0
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)\WINDOWS.0="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(3)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
It's the 'partition(3)' that msconfig offers to erase after checking to see if the OS' are bootable.
..... john


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#17
January 19, 2018 at 20:40:16
Another Lazesoft tool.

Use Lazesoft Recovery Suite Home Edition. Open up & go to Disk Tools > Lost Partition Recovery.
Screenshot 9.
http://www.softpedia.com/get/System...

http://www.softpedia.com/get/System...
http://www.lazesoft.com/lazesoft-re...
How to Boot a Computer from a Lazesoft Recovery USB Device
http://www.lazesoft.com/create-a-bo...
How to Burn a Lazesoft Recovery CD
http://www.lazesoft.com/burn-a-boot...

AOMEI Partition Assistant Standard Edition
http://www.softpedia.com/get/System...
http://www.freewarefiles.com/Partit...
http://www.freewarefiles.com/screen...
http://www.extend-partition.com/fre...
Rebuild MBR
http://www.disk-partition.com/help/...
https://www.disk-partition.com/help...

How to Fix a damaged MBR (Master Boot Record) in Windows XP
http://www.lazesoft.com/windows-rec...

message edited by Johnw


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#18
January 20, 2018 at 06:41:54
Hi John,
I downloaded Lazesoft Home Edition. If I read it right, it seems that I have to burn this to a disk to run the option you're suggesting?? But regardless, I'm going to stick with trvlr's approach, until we hit a dead end, before trying something else. Thanks for your help and suggestions.
.... john

message edited by shakushinnen


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#19
January 20, 2018 at 08:08:14
Your boot.ini as posted shows two of three partitions - partitions (2) and (3).

Partition(3) has the original installation and partition(2) has the newer one.

Partition(1) is of course not listed as it's in effect hidden. and that partition had(?) the original boot files for XP. If I interpret your initial post info correctly - the partition table (located a the head of the drive) was damaged somehow. Also that hidden partition(1) and may have had some other minor utility too related to possible system recovery software (very common with most current computers).

The mbr is always located at the start of the drive (at the first sector); this article discusses it all in some depth - and explains how the boot system works. If the mbr is damaged, corrupted, lost then of course a drive cannot boot into an installed OS...; likewise if the master partition table is damaged...

http://www.dewassoc.com/kbase/hard_...

When you installed the new version of windows did you deliberately create a new partition for it?

Via the new version of XP if you run Disk Manager - can you see the entire hard drive partitioning; and
if so what is shown there?

I find it odd that Easus doesn't find/show the partition(3) as being present; but it's been a while since I used any of those utilities... Disk Manager inspection as above will confirm either the presence or absence of that partition(3); which in truth Is obviously there as you can see the original windows installation via Explorer run within windows.0

So confirm as above and then let's see if it is possible to recover the original version. The bootcgf (/rebuild) routine is "supposed" to find and add any winnt family OS it can and add them (at your choice) to the boot.ini; and thus render them bootable.

It may be that one of the utilities which Johnw has listed may resolve it to; but if you're OK to try the bootcfg etc. first then fine...

If the bootcfg doesn't work then one can try a repair installation "again"; but ensuring one targets the correct version of windows...


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#20
January 20, 2018 at 08:34:20
Incidentally... when you say you can see both Windows (the original) and Windows.0 via Explorer in the newer installation - are both windows folders shown as being in the same partition? Likely listed one below the other?

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#21
January 20, 2018 at 14:07:25
"If I read it right, it seems that I have to burn this to a disk'
Yes john, it is a boot disk, you have to change the bios to boot from it first. I personally have it on an thumb drive.

"I'm going to stick with trvlr's approach, until we hit a dead end, before trying something else"
Perfect strategy.


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#22
January 20, 2018 at 16:18:12
Hi John,
Yes, I burned it to a CD, but haven't tried it yet.
Thanks,
.... john

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#23
January 20, 2018 at 16:41:49
Hi trvlr,
Alright, I've checked everything again.
Easeus shows two partitions, the one I made and one other, presumably the new installation.
Disk Manager shows the same as Easeus.
Boot.ini (msconfig) shows two entries. It calls them partitions, as you saw above. I have a feeling that msconfig determines partitions according to the number of windows directories present,of which there are two. I have no other explanation.
Windows explorer shows C: and D:. The properties calls them local drives. (D: is the partition I created as a boot partition, which didn't work) C: of course, is the new installation. The two windows directories, 'Windows' and 'Windows0'. are on the C:
I think we have only two partitions here: D, the one I made as a boot partitons, hoping that the original installation would recognize it and boot, which didn't happen ..... and C, the new installation, which contains both the original (Windows) and the new (Windows0) directories. C: also contains all my original files.
.... john

message edited by shakushinnen


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#24
January 20, 2018 at 17:43:54
Hi again john, can I see what this program shows please.

Please download and run ListParts by Farbar (for 32-bit system):
http://download.bleepingcomputer.co...
Please download and run ListParts64 by Farbar (for 64-bit system):
http://download.bleepingcomputer.co...
Click on the Scan button.
The scan results will open in Notepad.
Copy and Paste the contents into your reply.
If Listparts won't run. May get the message > The disk management services could not complete the operation
1: Restart the computer. Any messages after the reboot?
2: Delete your copy of ListParts and download the latest ListParts and this time put in on the root of C drive (start => My Computer => C drive). Run ListParts, Copy & Paste the contents the log in your next reply.


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#25
January 21, 2018 at 07:23:28
So… both Easus and Windows Disk Manager agree that there are two (visible) partitions on the drive. Partitions(2) and (3).

Windows Explorer shows that both folder Windows and Windows.0 are in the same partition – identified as “ C “.

Disk Manager etc. confirm your other partition “ D” being present too.

The boot.ini confirms that Windows.0 is in partition(2) and that is by default designated as “C “ when Windows boots up. However… the boot.ini shows that Windows is in partition(3)… Why this is so – beyond me at this time; as how the drive was partitioned etc. prior to current situation isn’t entirely clear. And what you actually effected when trying to create the XP/Linux dual boot likewise…

Still… What does the boot.ini actually do and without going into the somewhat arcane details (and they’re not entirely easy to follow) re’ what happens when the NT family boots up (and the process is somewhat similar too for dos based OS other than NT-family). Briefly… at the correct point in the initial boot sequence the boot.ini is read to discover what operating systems are installed and recorded in the boot.ini; and where they are is on the physical drive(s)…

The boot.ini entry contains 4 references. One relates to non SCSI devices; one to SCSI devices; one refers to whichever SCSI device has something on it; and one refers to the partition(s) on the non SCSI devices/drives.

This excellent article explains it all a little more fully; not the least which values are linked…

Drives are numbered starting with “ 0 “ (Zero); partitions start their numbering with “ 1 “.

On your hard drive (non SCSI) multi = 0; disk = 0; rdisk = 0 as you have only one disk present; partition = 2 (as the OS mentioned in that line of the boot.in is located/installed in the second partition on the drive)

If you had a second disk present and there was and entry in the boot.ini showing it as having an OS installed on that second drive, then that second disk would have the number rdisk(1); and the partition entry in that line of the boot.ini would reflect which partition on that drive has the OS.

Presuming the Disk Manager details are correct, and the “ C” folder listing as viewed via Explorer is correct – showing the presence of Windows.0 & Windows folders both in the “C “ drive (partition) – then the reason that “Windows” won’t boot is because the boot.ini entry for it is incorrect.

The boot.ini show Windows as being in partition (3) - which logically is “ D” on your single drive; whilst the boot.ini correctly shows Windows.0 as being in partition(2). Yet Explorer clearly shows “both” versions of windows (Windows and Windows.0) being in the “same” partition (identified as “ C” when viewed via Explorer in Windows.0).

So one needs to edit the boot.ini to correct the syntax error referring to Windows. One needs to change the partition(3) entry to read partition(2); save the change, and reboot. Do NOT edit the lines referring to Windows.0… : leave those two lines as is; both the default OS to boot entry, and the line in the main body of the boot.ini text.

NOTE --- Currently the default OS to boot is the new(er) Windows.0 – which also leave as is – for now.

When the system reboots the boot.ini will pop up as normal; arrow down/select the entry for WINDOWS -now listed as being in partition(2) - and manually boot to that.

Presuming it does… problem solved?

You can set the Windows (original version) as the default OS to boot later if you wish. I’d be inclined to retain the newer Windows.0 installation too; mainly as a means of access at any time should the older version presents problems and you need to access data thereon?

The bootcfg routine can also make the change to the Windows entry; i.e. partition(3) to partition(2) when run correctly.

The neosmart article I posted earlier details how to use it. Some pholks like to let bootcfg make any required changes – it doesn’t usually remove invalid entries (unless you tell it to as I recall); or one can do it manually – using notepad.The xphelpandsupport link has a very clear and simple “how to edit the boot.ini” tutorial; and I suggest you read both the neosmart and the xphelp… articles first; and then follow which ever seems easiest?

As you will “only (at least initially) be dealing with the boot.ini entry referring to Windows – NOT Windows.0 – and will not change the default OS to boot, the system will still boot to Windows.0 automatically if allowed. By editing only the Windows entry and manually selecting it boot when you reboot after the editing – you will not have affected your current ability to boot to the new(er) Windows.0 if needs be.

Do make a backup copy of the current boot.ini; and ideally print it out too. Useful to have hard copy reference and of course the backup allows one to revert to the pre-edited version is needs-be; though I see no reason why that will be required.

How the current entry for Windows became partition(3) when on the drive as was prior to this whole situation evolving – is beyond me; it would more than likely have been partition(2).


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#26
January 21, 2018 at 17:34:11
Hi trvlr/John,
I deleted The D partition, and I am still seeing two 'partitions' in the boot.ini. The descriptions are the same, except that they are now called partition1 and partition3. The 'windows' partition is still the one that msconfig says will not boot. Now Easeus sees on partition. Windows explorer sees one partition, with two window directories, as before. The boot menu still shows two "Microsoft Windows XP Professional" entries. And disk management shows one partition. I still think that windows is assuming that two windows directories means two partitions.
I am posting the log file from Listparts. (This was run after deleting the D partition.)

ListParts by Farbar Version: 31-07-2014
Ran by Administrator (administrator) on 21-01-2018 at 15:20:16
Windows XP (X86)
Running From: C:\active\Misc Apps
Language: English (United States)
************************************************************

========================= Memory info ======================

Percentage of memory in use: 8%
Total physical RAM: 3454.48 MB
Available physical RAM: 3160.97 MB
Total Pagefile: 5337.71 MB
Available Pagefile: 5172.31 MB
Total Virtual: 2047.88 MB
Available Virtual: 2012.59 MB

======================= Partitions =========================

1 Drive c: (SATA500GIG) (Fixed) (Total:465.76 GB) (Free:449.98 GB) NTFS ==>[Drive with boot components (Windows XP)]

Disk ### Status Size Free Dyn Gpt
-------- ---------- ------- ------- --- ---
Disk 0 Online 466 GB 0 B

Partitions of Disk 0:
===============

Partition ### Type Size Offset
------------- ---------------- ------- -------
Partition 1 Primary 466 GB 32 KB
======================================================================================================

Disk: 0
Partition 1
Type : 07
Hidden: No
Active: Yes

Volume ### Ltr Label Fs Type Size Status Info
---------- --- ----------- ----- ---------- ------- --------- --------
* Volume 1 C SATA500GIG NTFS Partition 466 GB Healthy System (partition with boot components)
======================================================================================================
============================== MBR Partition Table ==================

==============================
Partitions of Disk 0:
===============
Disk ID: 1549F232
Partition 1: (Active) - (Size=466 GB) - (Type=07 NTFS)


****** End Of Log ******


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#27
January 21, 2018 at 20:59:51
"I am still seeing two 'partitions' in the boot.ini"

john, with only one Operating system installed, you need to edit the boot.ini to this below. Nothing else should be there.
HOW TO: Edit the Boot.ini File in Windows XP
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us...
https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/win...

Just in case trvlr has something else in mind, wait as usual until he is online again.

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect

message edited by Johnw


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#28
January 22, 2018 at 07:27:51
Hi trvlr/John,
Alright, just to make sure we're all on the same page.
Here is the current boot.ini, after deleting partition D
[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS.0
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS.0="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(3)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect

The "Windows.0" option is the current default, and it boots.
The "Windows" option is the one msconfig says will not boot.
I want to boot into "Windows", if possible. If I can do that I can save myself a lot of time re-customizing, setting up drivers, installing software, etc..
.... john


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#29
January 22, 2018 at 12:34:16
To clarify current situation...

The boot.ini as now shown was copied from the msconfig?

Both versionsof windows are inthe same partition?

Windos.0 boots ok and that enabled you to run msconfig and view the current boot.ini?

Presuming the above is correct, two things to do.... The first more a confirmation re' how the drive is partitioned "now".

Boot into windows.0 and view the hard drive via disk manager. What do you see in terms of partition layout; only one partition (a primary); or is there also another hidden partition (at the head ofthe drive) and if so is it also a primary?

Second thing to do...

Edit the boot.ini so as to change "only" the partition(3) entry for windows to be partition(1) - i.e. the same as for windows.0 entry.

Do NOT change the details for windows.0 nor the line for default OS to boot.

Ensure that time to boot is at least 15seconds, ideally the default 30seconds; if necessary edit that value. Gives you time to select which OS to boot other than the default.

Save changes and reboot. When the boot-menu comes up let it boot as now to the default OS - i.e. windows.0. When it has done so ok, reboot again and this time when the boot-menu appears, use the arrow keys to select the line for windows (NOT windows.0) as the OS to boot. Do NOT set that entry as default OS to boot - yet. (To change the default OS that option is within the startup/shutdown tab.)

If everything is now correct re' the windows version syntax in the boot.ini the windows version ought to boot ok. Presuming so, you can set it as default OS to boot if you wish?

Incidentally where are you located? I note that Johnw (he's on an iceberg just north of Antartica and you seem to be online at about the same time? Presumably you're either in the same time zone, or close enough time zone wise - possibly west coast Canada/USA or somewhere within the Pacific etc.? I'm currently in the UK so I'm 5hrs ahead of Eastern N. America, 8hrs ahead of the West Coast; and about 8 behind Johnw's iceberg......

Why reboot to window.0 first after editing the windows version syntax in the boot.ini? That's simply to confirm that you haven't done anything amiss at that stage, as windows.0 ought still to be the default OS to boot.

Why not simply create the simpler boot.ini as per Johnw's example. At this stage it's wiser/safer I suggest to ensure you can still boot to wndows.0 as that will allow further inspections, options if needs-be. Also I would retain that basic windows.0 installation as means of booting and/or data recovery etc. if there are any problems in the future with the (hopefully) now functioning windows version...

You'll note that I like to make changes slowly and confirm each is OK a step at a time... That way if something goes awry you only have one step top retrace...; not several and not knowing which is the faulty step/change to correct...

I would like to know what disk manager shows for the drive - when run from each version of windows. If possible even a screen shot?

I'm not yet convinced that there is only a single (primary) partition on the drive; not the least as you mentioned earlier a small (100meg) partition at the head of the drive. Thus disk manager details may (ought to) show exactly what the drive configuration is?

Not knowing "exactly" how the drive was originally configured, and exactly what actions you performed when attempting the dual boot with Linux, it's not easy to understand quite how you ended up with boot.ini that appears to show3 partition at one stage (the original hidden - if I'm correct about that; and the original windows partition and then of course the newer windows.0 partition). There are some niggling questions in my mind; more academic at this stage I think... But I would like to understand what happened initially and how you arrived at the boot.ini as posted earlier and now the latest one...

The boot.ini is created (normally) during setup; and is only updated when either another NT based OS goes in (be it another copy of the same already there or any other member of the nNT family); or... one runs the bootcfg command with the appropriate "switch/option". I'm not aware that simply deleting a partition will encourage/allow the boot.ini to be changed that way... But possibly my understanding there is a little lacking?

Your boot.ini (after editing) will be like this:

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS.0
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS.0="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect

Incidentally - where are you located? I note that you and Johnw seem to be online at about the same time; which suggest you're either in the same time zone or close enough so? Currently I'm in the UK and 5hrs ahead of the east coast of N/America, 8hrs ahead of the west coast; and 8hrs behind Johnw - he's on an iceberg just north of Antarctica.

message edited by trvlr


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#30
January 22, 2018 at 13:31:20
I agree with trvlr, as it is booting to WINDOWS.0, leave that in the boot.ini

Edit out of the boot.ini > multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(3)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect


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#31
January 22, 2018 at 13:35:46
The windows.0 is a basic version - no apps etc.... He wants to recover (if possible) the windows version (with all its apps etc.).

So simply editing the boot.in to change partition(3) - in the line for windows (NOT windows.0) to become partition(1) ought to be all that is required - if the installation is otherwise OK?


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#32
January 22, 2018 at 13:37:28
As an aside... John - you might enjoy this:

https://news.sky.com/video/penguin-...


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#33
January 22, 2018 at 13:43:34
"So simply editing the boot.in to change partition(3) - in the line for windows (NOT windows.0) to become partition(1) ought to be all that is required"
Yep, that gets us back to a stock standard boot.ini

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#34
January 22, 2018 at 13:46:42
"As an aside... John - you might enjoy this:"
Love the internet, thanks.



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#35
January 22, 2018 at 13:48:37
"Johnw (he's on an iceberg just north of Antartica and you seem to be online at about the same time?"

I'm here.
https://www.timeanddate.com/worldcl...


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#36
January 22, 2018 at 14:09:36
It's the lack of clear info as to what happened initially with the drive in question that leaves a few puzzles... But I doubt we'll ever really know the full what/why etc. - presuming the edited boot.in as discussed resolves it all.

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#37
January 22, 2018 at 15:15:45
trvlr
"I'm not yet convinced that there is only a single (primary) partition on the drive; not the least as you mentioned earlier a small (100meg) partition at the head of the drive"

ListParts did not find any hidden partitions.

I just fired up an old XP drive & a laptop.
Neither have any extra partitions.
https://i.imgur.com/nDu7LrZ.gif
https://i.imgur.com/PivvWrY.gif


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#38
January 22, 2018 at 15:25:54
Wow!! Amazing.
It looks like he just wanted to see if everything was alright. After he had satisfied himself that that was the case ....... he left.
Thanks trvlr.

message edited by shakushinnen


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#39
January 22, 2018 at 15:29:24
I think we're about an hour different. It's 18:30 here and your shortcut shows 19:30 there.
By the way, here is Markham, just north of Toronto, Ontario.
... john

message edited by shakushinnen


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#40
January 22, 2018 at 15:41:04
Hi trvlr,
Well, the whole thing started when I decided that I was going to remove some of the useless stuff on my drive, prior to installing Linux. I only deleted a small partition (~100mbs), as far as I recall. I know you think that Windows XP does not have a separate boot partition, but ....... I have no other explanation. The farthest I got with installing Linux was burning it to a disk, and that was done on my Windows 7 computer.
..... john

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#41
January 22, 2018 at 15:47:20
#3 refers to a wee small partition... i may have misread/misinterpreted the info as that being on the problem drive, whereas it is on the backup?

Where I used work (before I was asked to leave being too olde and no doubt expensive - compared to the very young types who didn't have much experience) I recall that all our workstations, laptops and later tablet style laptops had a small hidden partition and a larger main partition. The hidden partition was related to recovery options. The larger partition was bootable and thus likely a Primary (if I remember correctly); the hidden was likewise a Primary.

The main partition was designated rdisk(o) partition(2) - the drives were all non SCSI, i.e. SATA. The company was conned into going for hp/compaq after having been on Dell systems previously. It was not a popular choice at the time.

My 2005 vintage Acer laptop (XP-Pro) also had the wee small hidden partition, and the much larger main one...


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#42
January 22, 2018 at 15:52:46
I remember when Markham was out in the sticks, an hour's drive up Highway 48(?).

But that was a long time ago - back in the '60s and earlier...

Now it's enclosed in Metro Toronto's greater urban sprawl...

There used to be film studios etc. in Markham, and the movie Women in Love, and some of the (later) Avengers series were shot there.


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#43
January 22, 2018 at 15:58:50
Hi JohnW,
Yes, that's exactly what my disk management shows, one partition, plus my CD drive. But I have a thought as to how the extra partitions got on my drive.
Over the years I've used various cloning softwares to copy my installations to other drives, HDClone, XXClone, Clonezilla, Seagate disk wizard, Western digital disk wizard, probably others. Maybe one of these uses a boot partition in the cloning process???
.... john

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#44
January 22, 2018 at 16:04:22
"Maybe one of these uses a boot partition in the cloning process???"
Yep, that sounds logical john.

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#45
January 22, 2018 at 16:06:40
Interesting.
Yes, when I was a boy living in Scarborough (in the 60's), going to Markham was a day trip. Now ..... 45 minutes.
Visually, now, there's no division between Markham and Scarborough, except that Scarborough plows their roads in the winter, and Markham still sports a snowmobile mentality.
... john

message edited by shakushinnen


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#46
January 22, 2018 at 16:09:44
By the way John. I noticed that the Lazesoft tool you recommended has a cloning function. Have you ever tried it?
.... john

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#47
January 22, 2018 at 16:21:57
This is our Scarborough with the new beach side pool.
http://bit.ly/2DZjvlL
http://bit.ly/2DsRZw6
http://bit.ly/2DsP071
https://www.scarboroughbeachpool.co...

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#48
January 22, 2018 at 16:24:54
"Have you ever tried it?"
No john, fantastic tool though, have used many of it's functions dozens of times.

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#49
January 22, 2018 at 16:36:08
"This is our Scarborough with the new beach side pool."
Now, I'm turning green.
..... john

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#50
January 23, 2018 at 05:29:41
Is the original windows installation booting OK?

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#51
January 23, 2018 at 06:20:09
Hi trvlr,
I don't know. I haven't tried your suggestion(s) yet. There seemed to be some confusion, at least in my mind, as to what was going on. Are we still going ahead with previous plan, i.e. entry #31? I won't have access to the computer for about 5 hours; during which time I will be out.
... john

message edited by shakushinnen


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#52
January 23, 2018 at 07:48:48
✔ Best Answer
My route is to maintain the newer version - Windows.0 as the default OS to boot - for now.

Edit the boot.in so that the entry for "Windows" partition(3) becomes partition(1) - the same partition (in fact the only partition..) as Windows.0

Save the changes and reboot - ensuring the time to boot is at least 15seconds - preferably the default 30seconds.

Let the system boot as now - to confirm that Windows.0 is still viable.

Then reboot and manually select the original Windows version (now showing as also in partition(1) - NOT (3) as previously - and see if it will boot OK... You select it course using the arrow keys on the keyboard... and press enter/return to activate the choice.

Presuming it boots OK... (theoretically it ought to...) I'd check contents etc. are OK. Then reboot to reconfirm it boots OK. - again manually. Presuming it does still boot OK then you can set it as default OS to boot.

Maintaining the newer Windows.0 installation as an alternative in the boot-menu is a useful tool/option; as it will allow you access to files in the original version if needs-be; and also permit other trouble-shooting measures in the future - should the occasion arise?

In other words you will have a dual boot Windows (original) and Windows.0(newer basic installation).

Incidentally one of the sub divisions in Scarborough in the 70s was found to be high in radon gas in many of the homes; and also (I think it was the same subdivision) it was discovered to have been a dumping ground for radium based paint (as used on WW2 instruments for the military amongst others). The whole dump had been conveniently "forgotten" (as they say... but don't believe it...) until a group of Ryerson engineering students did some research and homework... concerning another structure in Jarvis St (where those instruments had their dials painted...). It's quite a saga and it meant that the homes affected had to be evacuated... Not sure if they dug out the basements etc. to remove the contamination, or if the homes were demolished and the ground cleared that way? I know of the Jarvis St. building as I one attended a one week course there on (broadcast) camera maintenance for U of T... I worked at Scarborough College shortly after it opened and later for downtown U of T Med Sciences... Scarborough college was initially "out in the wilds"; and there traces of earlier pioneers'/settlers' homes/cabins nearby... "Suburbia" ended at Hwy 48 and Lawrence, and Yonge and Shepard (and also further westward) if not a little lower down in some parts. Jane St was a country road in the late 60s...; and Malton airport (Lester Pearson now?) was a wee small almost miniature parody of what it is now... The 401 was two lanes each way and the Yonge/401 junction wasn't really completed until the early 70's; and even since then it's been evolving all the way along the 401...


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#53
January 23, 2018 at 20:05:37
OK trvlr,
You're a bloody genius. Thanks.
And thanks to JohnW.
I now have my original OS and the new one as a backup.
I appreciate your help.
I recognize all of the places of which you speak. I wasn't aware of the radon gas business though. I lived at St Clair and Victoria Pk. 'til I was 15, then moved away.
Later on, when I moved back to the city I went to Scarborough college for my science degree, but ended up taking many of my courses at St. George, because the Scarborough campus didn't have a full roster of science credits in night school at the time. I spent many many happy hours wondering around the Scarborough campus woods and buildings, also on King's College circle. Yes, I'm very familiar with what you say. It brings back very good memories.
.... john

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