Solved Ran chkdsk on secondary hard disk - now get BSOD constantly

June 29, 2013 at 05:40:45
Specs: Windows XP SP3, AMD Athlon 64x2 / 3gb RAM
Hi everyone.

I really need some help and advice. I'll set out the problem as briefly as I can below and any assistance would be hugely appreciated.

I have one hard drive with two partitions. Windows XP SP3 is installed on the c: drive along with all the program files I've downloaded since upgrading my computer. Everything else - including cloned copies of two older disk drives - was on my d: drive.

A couple of weeks ago after installing a new graphics card and running multi monitors I kept getting BSOD caused by Nvidia drivers. I sorted this out but thought I had better run chkdsk on both drives/partitions.

Chkdsk ran smoothly for the c:drive. It only ran on the d: drive after being dismounted and there were a couple of things it claimed to fix, namely 'discovered free space marked as allocated in volume bitmap' and a similar thing but 'allocated in master file table'.

Next time I switched the computer on I got a BSOD with the following error message:

STOP: 0x00000024 ntfs.sys B7E55167 base at B7E48000 datestamp 48025be5

Now I can't boot into safe mode or even into the recovery console without receiving the same blue screen. Even worse, XP was pre-installed on this computer so I have no cd (though I assume the files are somewhere on the system). I do have an Acronis boot cd but can't see anything useful on here apart from basically wiping the entire thing.

So I guess I have two questions:

(1) Does anyone know of why the above could have happened and what a potential solution might be? I wondered if chkdsk had somehow found and rebuilt the ancient XP installations from my cloned hard drives buried deep in partition d: an that has caused havoc. But i'm purely guessing - I now next to nothing about how these things work!

(2) Assuming the worst and that I'll never be able to get back in, is it possible to buy a new hard drive, install Windows 7 on it and then set my current hard drive up as some kind of 'slave' so that I can still access all the programs and files on it even though I can no longer boot from it?

Many thanks in advance for any help and apologies if some of you would have put this in a different forum. I find it hard to judge if this is a hard drive issue or an XP one (or both).


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✔ Best Answer
June 30, 2013 at 07:41:29
Just to bring this to a close, I have managed to fix the issue.

I downloaded a Linux boot cd from the Knoppix website and burned it to cd using my laptop. I then booted into Linux from the cd and ran the ntfsfix command. I removed the cd, rebooted the computer and everything is back to normal.

Thanks to those who tried to assist.



#1
June 29, 2013 at 06:29:06
Did you run CHKDSK /F or CHKDSK /R?

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#2
June 29, 2013 at 06:44:50
I ran chkdsk /f /r

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#3
June 29, 2013 at 07:01:10
It helps to tell the whole story. Did you boot off the XP disk & run it from the Recovery Console? Did you try running it on the C: partition a 2nd time? Have you run the HDD manufacturer's diagnostic software to confirm the drive is OK?

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Related Solutions

#4
June 29, 2013 at 07:10:52
No, unfortunately I don't have an XP disk because the operating system was pre-installed when I bought the computer. I had installed the recovery console as a boot option precisely for moments like these but when I access it now I get the blue screen referred to above before I have chance to do anything.

Similarly, I can't get back into the computer to run chkdsk again - or to run the HDD diagnostics - because I get the blue screen within moments of switching the computer on. However, it's less than two weeks since I did run the diagnostic and there were no problems highlighted at that time.


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#5
June 29, 2013 at 15:45:39
"set my current hard drive up as some kind of 'slave' so that I can still access all the programs "
You would see the programs and files but the programs wouldn't run because the main drive would not have them in its registry. They would have to be re-installed on the new drive.

On the general topic, can you get into Command Prompt?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#6
June 29, 2013 at 15:54:31
Thanks, Derek. It's useful to know I could at least get at the files, even if the programs themselves would need to be reinstalled.

On the topic itself, I can't even get into command prompt currently, though I could potentially create an MS Dos startup disk from a different computer and use that to get there? I presume then there are options for restoring or correcting the fault?


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#7
June 29, 2013 at 16:18:45
I was only wondering if running System Restore from Command Prompt might help (obviously not as you can't even get there).

XP (onwards) has no DOS, even Command Prompt is part of the operating system. The Disk Operating System (DOS) is "Windows XP itself". I don't therefore think a DOS startup disk would help you.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#8
June 30, 2013 at 07:41:29
✔ Best Answer
Just to bring this to a close, I have managed to fix the issue.

I downloaded a Linux boot cd from the Knoppix website and burned it to cd using my laptop. I then booted into Linux from the cd and ran the ntfsfix command. I removed the cd, rebooted the computer and everything is back to normal.

Thanks to those who tried to assist.


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#9
June 30, 2013 at 08:24:37
Neat solution - thanks fo feedback.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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