Solved PLEASE HELP with computer discarded by doctor's office

August 24, 2012 at 09:46:44
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I don't know much about computers and technology. My husband who works at a Dr's Office, brought me one of the offices Dell computers in which they were throwing away b/c they are renovating/upgrading the entire office. I am unable to do anything with it b/c it is password protected, and I can't access anything but the homepage. I'm wondering if there's a way to completely erase/uninstall the entire program and everything in it and replace with a Windows xp home edition

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#1
August 24, 2012 at 10:21:44
Sounds a bit fishy.

A Doctors office disposing of a computer without first wiping it clean!

Stuart


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#2
August 24, 2012 at 10:26:56
Whatever, the answer is simple. Ask your husband's employer; they must know what the password is.

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#3
August 24, 2012 at 10:33:14
✔ Best Answer
Better idea: Take the computer to a local shop and have them install WinXP/Win7 on it for you. It should take a few hours and probably a new Windows license.

StuartS:
You've never done IT work for a small doctor's office, I take it.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#4
August 24, 2012 at 12:41:08

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#5
August 24, 2012 at 12:54:01
Don't like that idea; a fresh install will get rid of any business specific settings, programs, and data. That should reduce your liability. Changing the admin password doesn't.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#6
August 24, 2012 at 13:35:34
Boot a from Retail XP CD and during install delete and create a new partion removing all previous data:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/978307

ARM Devices the future. Windows have accepted the fact!


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#7
August 24, 2012 at 15:26:02
You've never done IT work for a small doctor's office, I take it.

No I haven't but I would imagine that anyone who had would appreciate that a computer used in a Doctors Office is likely to have some pretty confidential information on it.

The size of the office is irrelevant.

Stuart


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#8
August 24, 2012 at 15:51:51
The size of the office is relevant to the amount of money you can afford for IT services.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#9
August 24, 2012 at 18:51:59
Doesn't take and expert to wipe a computer of confidential information on it into before releasing it into the wild.

Release a computer with confidential information into the wild on it in Britain and you likely to end up paying a very stiff fine, far more than hiring somebody to do job.

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga...

Stuart


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#10
August 24, 2012 at 19:33:54
Doesn't take and expert to wipe a computer of confidential information on it into before releasing it into the wild.
You're talking about people who think deleting a file is sufficient.

Release a computer with confidential information into the wild on it in Britain and you likely to end up paying a very stiff fine, far more than hiring somebody to do job.
Yep, and that's a great sales pitch used by many IT support shops, but we're not talking about the legal aspect. We're talking about the behaviors of people who assign "IT work" to the office assistant who knows Excel the best. They barely understand the need for dedicated IT professionals, and that's fine. I'm sure my doctor would be horrified to know what I do to my body in my ignorance.

That's mostly the reason why I visit doctors affiliated with some larger medial entity. They generally enforce a certain level of IT competence on the offices, if just to minimize their own liability.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#11
August 24, 2012 at 20:04:32
What you do with you on body Razor is you own business.

Yep, and that's a great sales pitch used by many IT support shops

No, that is legal advice given by lawyers trying to keep their clients out of the courts.
In Britain , what a Doctors does with some else's personal information is legal a responsibility, not a civil one.

Stuart


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#12
August 24, 2012 at 20:11:38
If you say so. I don't live there.

We've derailed this thread enough. If you want to continue arguing if highly educated people are capable of actions we perceive as dumb and/or are criminal, I suggest we take it to the Lounge, where others can chime in.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#13
August 25, 2012 at 07:25:32
I am not really understanding any of these responses. As I said - the computer was given to me, nothing illegal going on here. It has very few programs on it but nobodys personal info. That would be in the system, not "saved" on the computer. I can't even change a setting on this computer, there aren't even options to access settings - NOTHING! You can open the start up tab and the only thing to come up is printers/faxers. There aren't even docs saved to it. I'de just like to know how to clear all of that out and install a windows home edition to it.

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#14
August 25, 2012 at 10:15:33
create a bootable cd out of this:
http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=07153

boot from the cd and and install it. let it wipe the drive and install the operating system. problem solved.

larry


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#15
August 25, 2012 at 12:52:06
"I'de just like to know how to clear all of that out and install a windows home edition to it"

That's not what you originally asked.

Have you ever installed Windows from scratch before? If you have a WinXP Home Edition disc & the product key, all you need to do is boot off the disc, reformat the hard drive, then proceed with the installation. You will need to install the device drivers, SP3 (if it's not on the disc), all the Windows Updates, an anti-virus program (I recommend Microsoft Security Essentials), & whatever other software you need.

Have a look at this: http://www.windowsxphome.windowsrei...


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