Player is installing itself on my CDs

November 18, 2010 at 12:37:44
Specs: Windows XP
I have an external DVD writer. A programme called Player is installing itself as a read only file on any CD I try to explore. I have tried various ways to erase it but with no success. Help!!!!!!

See More: Player is installing itself on my CDs

Report •

#1
November 18, 2010 at 12:57:46
Your description of the problem appears to be inaccurate. You don't write to a cd by exploring it. You write to a cd by writing to it.

Specifically what type of cd's are these?
Did you burn them?
What did you use to burn them with?

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question: http://tinyurl.com/2fsqqmu


Report •

#2
November 18, 2010 at 14:14:41
Hi,
I am not writing to a CD. I put a CD in the player, and when I try to explore or open it, I get this player programme coming up. When I try to delete or uninstall the player programme, it says that it is a read only file, and cannot be deleted.

Report •

#3
November 18, 2010 at 14:17:39
Sounds like something you downloaded or installed inadvertently. Look in Control Panel> Add/remove programs to see if it is listed there.

How are you attempting to access the disks?


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
November 18, 2010 at 14:34:04
Are these home burnt CD's and if so were they finalized and where were they burnt?

Are they CD-R or CD-RW?

If they are CD-R then it is about certain the file must have been put on there when burnt. Normal delete will not work for any files on CD-R's as they are seen as read-only. Same applies for commercial CD's.

EDIT:
I see some of these questions have already been asked in #1 and now #5. We need the answers to ALL of them in order to help diagnosis - that's why we ask them.

How to know you are getting old 3:
You start converting your age to hexadecimal


Report •

#5
November 18, 2010 at 14:38:29
Did you make the CDs or are they a commercial product?

Report •

#6
November 19, 2010 at 09:37:27
Hi,
Yes you are right. The programme must have downloaded off the internet about three days ago. When I put an audio CD in the DVD player, a notice came up "Before you can play this CD, some files need installing on your computer."
I stupidly, clicked OK. Now when I play an Audio CD, a player runs that I have not installed myself. I have a feeling that it is a Mac programme.
When I now try to access individual tracks, the player files come up, and not the CD tracks. My external DVD is designated E:/
If I open this drive empty, the player isn't there. It only

Report •

#7
November 19, 2010 at 09:43:07
Hi,
Yes you are right. The programme must have downloaded off the internet about three days ago. When I put an audio CD in the DVD player, a notice came up "Before you can play this CD, some files need installing on your computer."
I stupidly, clicked OK. Now when I play an Audio CD, a player runs that I have not installed myself. I have a feeling that it is a Mac programme.
When I now try to access individual tracks, the player files come up, and not the CD tracks. My external DVD is designated E:/
If I open this drive empty, the player isn't there. It only appears when I load a CD.
I've tried control panel uninstall, but isn't showing up on drive C:/ The player files are
read only.

Report •

#8
November 19, 2010 at 09:49:19
Where are you finding the player files? If they are on your hard drive you can change the attributes by right clicking on the file. You may need to have administrator privileges.

Report •

#9
November 19, 2010 at 09:52:14
It is called Player.exe and it is most likely a trojan. See the following link "for information only":
http://www.auditmypc.com/process/pl...

I have many video players on my XP but I have no sign of a file with that name. I'll scout around on it but in the meantime download the free version of MalwareBytes, install it, update it then run it. If it finds anything let it fix it.

Some trojans prevent you installing things like MalwareBytes so lets hope it works. Be careful using "magic fixes" found on websites because they can be as bad as a virus themselves. If MalwareBytes doesn't sort it out then for the time being type msconfig in the Run box and see if player.exe is listed in startup. If so untick it for now and see if that helps. Even if that cures the problem some more work will need to be done to properly remove it.

If I find anything more useful I'll let you know.

How to know you are getting old 3:
You start converting your age to hexadecimal


Report •

#10
November 19, 2010 at 10:03:29
Booting into Windows Safe Mode with networking may help with installing and running malwarebytes.

I also suggest you install Microsoft Security Essentials.

http://www.microsoft.com/security/p...


Report •

#11
November 19, 2010 at 10:06:31
What antivirus (if any) have you onboard?

How to know you are getting old 3:
You start converting your age to hexadecimal


Report •

#12
November 19, 2010 at 10:39:52
Thanks Derek.

Report •

#13
November 19, 2010 at 11:33:25
Sounds like a typical program install when you load a cd that has file types that are unique to it.

Did you look in add/remove programs for this player?

And that isn't player on my cds, it's when I open a cd a player automatically starts up.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question: http://tinyurl.com/2fsqqmu


Report •

#14
November 19, 2010 at 15:24:05
Antimalware software doesn't see it as a virus. Nor does antivirus. I can scan the DVD drive and it shows up, but doesn't treat it as a threat.
It doesn't show up on msconfig.

Report •

#15
November 19, 2010 at 15:27:35
Well, there is also the possibility of it being some third party program that is not a virus. Presumably it is not in Add-Remove (sorry if you mentioned it somewhere already).

How to know you are getting old 3:
You start converting your age to hexadecimal


Report •

#16
November 19, 2010 at 19:14:13
So you find the file on the DVD disks? Are these commercial disks or home brewed?

Report •

#17
November 19, 2010 at 20:07:54
Yes, the type of disk seems to be a closely guarded secret.

How to know you are getting old 3:
You start converting your age to hexadecimal


Report •

#18
November 20, 2010 at 06:56:44
The disk I am trying to explore is a commercial audio disk. I am trying to copy 1 track to my computer. It happens on any disc I try to explore. I can copy tracks using Windows Media player, but the tracks are then in wma format. I want them in mp3, and wave formats, so I need to be able to select them from the disc, and put them in a conversion programme like CD2MP3. I cannot do this due to this alien player opening when I try to open or explore the disc.

Report •

#19
November 20, 2010 at 07:30:43
Sounds like you may be dealing with Digital Rights Management issues.

If you would see fit to actually tell us what these disk contain we might be able to help you.

"The disk I am trying to explore is a commercial audio disk"

I am not aware of any DVD media that contains only music files. So is this disk a CD or DVD?

Going back to your original post, is this external writer a stand alone unit or one that is intended to be connected to a computer?

This entire issue may be simply that you have this player program set as the default program to open files with certain file extensions. That is a settable option in WinXP. I am not currently running XP and I don't remember the exact location and procedure to change those settings but they are there.

Finally "A programme called Player is installing itself as a read only file on any CD I try to explore".

That is impossible for any program to do. Commercial disks can't be written to again. Either the program was on there to start, or the program is on your computer.

BTW, all files on a CD,CDR,DVD,DVDR are read only be default because once the data has been burned it can't be erased.


Report •

#20
November 20, 2010 at 07:41:29
I must apologise to everyone. I was wrong to say that every disc is the same. The player programme is only on one disc. It isn't a programme that has installed itself on my computer. The programme is actually on the disc. I'm sorry, I have never come across this before. Once again I apologise for wasting your time.
hankbee.

Report •

#21
November 20, 2010 at 09:13:53
I've never heard of a player being built into a commercial disk but I guess there's a first time for everything. From Google, assuming it isn't a virus (which now seems much less likely) then an audio application from webmassiva called Softsynth player might have installed itself. See if this appears in Control Panel - Add/Remove.

How to know you are getting old 3:
You start converting your age to hexadecimal


Report •

#22
November 20, 2010 at 09:47:25
If it installed itself on the hard drive then you should be able to remove it off the hard drive. Have you found it on the hard drive?

Report •

#23
November 21, 2010 at 14:14:54
I have found this programme on demonstration discs made available as a giveaway with some local newspapers. It doesn't install itself and won't appear on any discs you make... unless you copy the original of course.

Report •

#24
November 21, 2010 at 15:25:40
That's right Ewen. It is actually on the disc. My disc is called "The Shadows Essential Collection", so if anyone else comes across it you know now.

Report •

#25
November 21, 2010 at 18:54:30
Hankbee

If your only issue at this time is the player on that one disk then you should be able to copy the files instead of accessing them.

Highlight the wanted files and right click on one of them and choose copy. Then paste somewhere on your hard drive.


Report •

#26
November 21, 2010 at 19:17:27
I googled Player.exe and there are many hits that suggest it is a trojan

Report •

#27
November 21, 2010 at 22:53:42
Helmut

If you followed this entire thread you would know that Player.exe is a file on a Commercial DVD. I seriously doubt a commercial DVD would come with a trojan on it.

See #20 above.

There are many programs that yield false positives when they are seen by malware utilities. That doesn't make them trojans.


Report •

Ask Question