No Bootable Drive

May 2, 2010 at 05:13:58
Specs: XP latest version, Unknown
Just as a follow-up to my previous thread, I have made the bootable disk for Memtest but get the same result as when I try to boot from my xp installation disk: the message, 'unable to boot from disk'. I have directed the boot sequence to the CD, of course.
Does that mean that the problem isn't the HDD after all?
Where do I go from here?
WTIA

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#1
May 2, 2010 at 06:27:02
Sounds like a problem with the cd drive to start with.


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#2
May 2, 2010 at 17:46:19
Would be an extraordinary coincidence if it has suddenly decided to pack up just at the time when my boot sequence has led to messages telling me there is 'no bootable partition on the drive' and what-have-you; the original failure had nothing to do with the CD drive. But if you're convinced, I'll see about getting another new CD drive (the one I got was replaced only a couple of yeas ago).

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#3
May 3, 2010 at 01:02:23
Neither xp or memtest disks boot, you could try knoppix, if nothing boots.

Does you system boot from usb? memtest86 might have files for that.

http://www.pendrivelinux.com/instal...

there might be tools there for testing

'no bootable partition on the drive' that sounds like, it is not booting from cd.


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Related Solutions

#4
May 3, 2010 at 07:45:07
<<Neither xp or memtest disks boot, you could try knoppix, if nothing boots.>>

But there is nothing wrong with the XP CD. Surely the boot failure indicates something to do with the hardware (and as I say, I believe it is unlikely to be the CD drive).

<<Does you system boot from usb?>>

No such option in the bios.

<< 'no bootable partition on the drive' that sounds like, it is not booting from cd.>>

But it *did* recognise both the CD and the HDD as far as to wipe the HDD. It just didn't install the windows files. And I put a different original windows xp disk in and it threw up the same message.
By drive, does it mean HDD or CD?
Incidentally, do you think maybe I haven't burnt the Memtest to CD properly? I did it on my Vista system but through the application imgburn (I burnt the .iso file onto it). I didn't see any option to make the files Windows-compatible; I just assumed they would be.

With thanks.


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#5
May 3, 2010 at 08:16:32
Aha! There *is* a USB option in my bios! Should I use USB FDD or one of the other options? Should simply copy the Memtest file that I burnt to CD, onto my memory stick or is there anything more to it than that? Should I erase my memory stick?
With thanks.

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#6
May 3, 2010 at 09:34:12
'no bootable partition on the drive' that sounds like it is booting
straight to the hard disk.

BIOS can see both cd drive & hard disk, but if it is not booting
the cd, then it could be the cd drive not reading the cd, try
another bootable disk, like ERD commander 2005

http://www.fullandfree.info/softwar...

are you absolutely sure, cd is the first boot option?

It seems strange that 2 bootable disks are not being seen.

You might be able to add the memtest iso file to pendrive

http://www.pendrivelinux.com/boot-m...
multiboot-usb/


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#7
May 3, 2010 at 15:08:18
Really sorry to say this but you guys are speaking a bit of a foreign language.
Can you spell out what my plan of attack should be? I gather that it's either motherboard or bios; I didn't so much as know that bios was hardware.
Should I set the bios to boot from USB? If so, which of the USB options should I take?
Am worried about the business of taking out the memory sticks one by one, as I don't have the savvy to make any deductions; or even to conduct the tests you suggest.
Nor have I ever been properly briefed as regards earthing myself. For static, I always do that trick of pressing the 'on' button while the power cable is disconnected -- I'm told it gets rid of the charge.
With thanks.

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#8
May 3, 2010 at 20:46:13
Look at your original post as there were additions.
To ground yourself, either touch a screw on any switchplate in your home or touch the inside metal of your computer chassis (off but plugged in) and then unplug it.
Your memory sockets have a little lever at each end. If you push these outward, the memory card pops up and is free. The contacts can be cleaned by gently rubbing with a soft clean (new) pencil eraser and blowing the dust off. To reinsert, make sure that the slot between the contacts aligns with the bar in the socket and press firmly until the end clips fully engage again. You can definitely remove and reinsert all connectors including power plugs, hard drive and CD signal cables (both ends). Some connectors you may need to be 'firm' with, just remove and reinsert by the plug, NOT by pulling on the wires. Hard drives and CD drives may use wide flat ribbon cables (EIDE or PATA) or narrow flat cables (SATA), be especially careful not to pull on the 'ribbon' cable itself. Rarely, but possible, is that you are getting poor contact through one of these cables, and reinserting will 'rub' them clean.
The reason you might want to remove one of say two memory cards is that if one is really gone badly, it may prevent booting but it is unlikely that both are that bad. Trying one card only, and then the other one only, your system may run slowly, but if it starts, the you KNOW that the problem is an easily replaceable part.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#9
May 3, 2010 at 20:56:19
The BIOS is the little program that loads to your processor from your motherboard FIRST, before ANYTHING. It tells the processor how to deal with your hardware at the initial stages of starting BEFORE your system can 'see' your hard drive, your CD drive, your keyboard, etc. If you have a working floppy drive, you can reload or flash your BIOS and replace it with the original or updated version (if it has become corrupt).
There is also usually a jumper (empty plug looking piece that slips over two pins) on your motherboard that will reset your BIOS to it's factory original settings (computer unplugged, switch back before plugging in again), if the BIOS is still good, but it's settings are so far off as not to even let someone in to reset it through the BIOS settings window (defaults can be usually selected within that window if available).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#10
May 3, 2010 at 20:59:13
If these do not help you or you are uncomfortable doing some of these, you may be best served by taking it to a professional (not a chain store preferably).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#11
May 5, 2010 at 06:37:54
I *eventually* managed to replace the memory sticks, having taken each out in turn. When I took either one out, I got the same message telling me it couldn't read from the drive.
When I tried memtest by USB, I got a message saying that
<Windows root> system32\hal.dll
was missing or corrupt.
I take it, then, that the fact that it threw up different messages according to the drive I directed it to when I set the boot sequence, implies that the bios is as it should be? So it's the motherboard, then?
With thanks.

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#12
May 5, 2010 at 11:25:32
I'm lost.


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