no audio- card O.K.

April 22, 2012 at 17:20:47
Specs: Windows XP
Just used my recovery disks for the first time on my HP Pavilion a1110n. Audio card is fine. Computer will not acknowledge the drive. no audio from Realtek ac'97 Terrible buzz in speakers

See More: no audio- card O.K.

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#1
April 22, 2012 at 17:47:50

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#2
April 22, 2012 at 18:36:29
A device that's built into the mboard and cannot be removed IS NOT A CARD !

Most HP and Compaq computers that I've worked on that had XP installed on them originally came with a brand name labeled recovery CD "XP Home (or Pro) SPx Re-installation CD" or similar. That CD has files on it that are almost all identical to those on a Microsoft OEM XP Home or Pro CD that has or doesn't have the same SP updates.
That's used the same way as a regular XP CD.
There are no extra drivers for your model on that CD that did not come with Windows.
You must load the drivers for devices the CD did not have built into it.
You may have another recovery CD or DVD that has the drivers for your model on it for you to install, or you can download the drivers you need from the downloads for your specfic model on the HP web site.

You must load the main chipset drivers for the mboard.

XP doesn't have the drivers built in for most things that first came out after XP was first released, circa 2001, and it doesn't have some of the drivers built in for things made before that.

Whenever you load Windows from a regular Windows CD (or DVD) from scratch, after Setup is finished you must load the drivers for the mboard, particularly the main chipset drivers, in order for Windows to have the proper drivers for and information about your mboard hardware, including it's AGP or PCI-E, ACPI, USB 2.0 if it has it, and hard drive controller support. If you have a generic system and have the CD that came with the mboard, all the necessary drivers are on it. If you load drivers from the web, brand name system builders and mboard makers often DO NOT have the main chipset drivers listed in the downloads for your model - in that case you must go to the maker of the main chipset's web site, get the drivers, and load them.


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#3
April 22, 2012 at 19:45:38
http://www.d-a-l.com/dan/Realtek_AC...

It's a good day when you learn something
-------------------------------------------


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Related Solutions

#4
April 24, 2012 at 07:53:16
Thank you for your help. I've identified the correct chipset driver as Intel 845GV but I'm unable to acquire a download. Do I leave whatever is in the computer and download a fresh driver? I'm lost. George

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#5
April 24, 2012 at 11:38:27
Here is the Chipset drivers

http://downloadcenter.intel.com/Det...


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#6
April 24, 2012 at 13:13:34
We've already told you all you need to know and do, if you'd just READ it.

If you have the type of Recovery disk I think you have .....

- you have to supply a Product Key for XP while installing the software

- you see the same things when you use that as when you use a regular Microsoft XP CD

....then Setup has NOT installed the main chipset drivers, and if the drivers for your audio adapter are not built into the CD, Setup has NOT installed audio drivers either.

RIGHT click on My Computer
Properties
Hardware
Device Manager

Do you see your audio adapter flagged as unknown or not working properly (yellow ! or red X) ?

Do you see anything else flagged that way ?

In any case, if the Intel main chipset drivers have already been installed, it does NO HARM AT ALL to try installing them again.

"HP Pavilion a1110n"

All the drivers for your model are here, including the proper audio adapter drivers.

HP Pavilion a1110n Desktop PC (home support page)
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/...

If they don't list your main chipset drivers, then you need to get them (the INF Update Utility) from the Intel web site as Gretti has pointed you to,

or, you could just get the main chipset drivers from the Intel web site because the newest ones listed there are the newest ones available anywhere.

If you're using the video built into that main chipset (onboard video), the Intel web site also has the newest available graphics drivers for that.
.....

"Computer will not acknowledge the drive"

I assume you meant.....

Computer will not acknowledge the driver(s) (for the audio adapter).
......

You have mentioned NOTHING about what type of Recovery disk or disks you used.

There is another type of Recovery disk set that is multiple disks that is an archive of all the software originally installed on the computer, that must be installed one disk after the other
If you installed a recovery disk SET, as in you were prompted by the first disk to insert the second one, etc.. then the proper audio drivers and main chipset drivers WERE installed. All the drivers for the devices your computer originallly came with were installed.

You haven't said whether you installed audio drivers after having used the Recovery disk.
If you HAVE, you MAY have installed the wrong drivers.


"Terrible buzz in speakers"

If it's a single pair of speakers, you plug them into the bright GREEN 1/8" port on the computer

If that doesn't help, if the proper audio drivers HAVE been installed, it's COMMON for the wiring of external speakers to get damaged inside their cables....

Try those speakers with another computer, or try other computer speakers with your computer (they must be amplified speakers).


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#7
April 24, 2012 at 13:31:26
Tubesandwires

I totally agree


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#8
April 24, 2012 at 17:20:28
I'm so sorry to have taken so much of your time. I'm very new to this field. I'm a PhD in music and piano restorer (no disks involved). If you have a piano or have any questions I'd always be delighted to help in any way. Incidentally, I installed all the 12 disks that HP had sent me years ago. However, it refused to load the last disk -called a supplementary recovery disk. I trust the audio driver was not on there. Tomorrow I'll check the transformer cable and try your suggestion of interchanging cables. Forever grateful- George

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#9
April 25, 2012 at 07:37:17
", I installed all the 12 disks that HP had sent me years ago. However, it refused to load the last disk -called a supplementary recovery disk."

Okay then, what you installed is
"another type of Recovery disk set that is multiple disks that is an archive of all the software originally installed on the computer, that must be installed one disk after the other ...'

"supplementary" probably indicates it wasn't essential to install that disk.

It's likely "....the proper audio drivers and main chipset drivers WERE installed. All the drivers for the devices your computer originally came with were installed. "...when you installed the other disks.


Were you prompted to insert the last disk or did you decide to try installing it on your own ?

If you decided to try installing it on your own, it's not essential that it be installed, it's optional

You may or may not have gotten documentation along with the set of disks - if you did get that,t there may info about what the supplementary disk is for.

Sometimes there are disks that can be optionally installed that you're not prompted to install.
E.g. a friend of mine had a Pavilion notebook that came with one disk that makes a small special purpose partition that has software on it related to playing music. If the hard drive is already full of data it probably won't install.

On the other hand, that model had the other type of Recovery disk set -
- a brand name labeled recovery CD "XP Home SP2 Re-installation CD" or similar.
- a disk with drivers and applications on it
- that disk for making the special small partition, along with a printed pamphlet about what it is for and how to install it. .

At one point we lost track of where the original recovery disks were, so I ordered them from the HP web site.
The set did not include the disk for making the special small partition or the printed pamphlet about what it is for and how to install it. .

Her model was one of the last HP Pavilion notebook models that still had an IDE hard drive.

Her Dad has that computer now, but I still have that Recovery disk set I ordered somewhere.

A friend of hers had a Compaq model that was slightly newer, no more than a year, that I worked on. It had a SATA hard, and the same type of Recovery disk set.
- a brand name labeled recovery CD "XP Pro SP2 Re-installation CD" or similar.
- a disk with drivers and applications on it



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#10
April 27, 2012 at 15:20:03
The hum in the speakers persisted despite a favorable ac output- perhaps it is in the dc conversion. At any rate ,I purchased new speakers- three of them. At first it didn't work. However I went into the audio window and was able for the first time to move the volume control. I did nothing. What made it work now? I can't thank you enough. You did it. Bless you all. George

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#11
April 27, 2012 at 15:42:11
Sometimes the AC to DC power adapter that the amplified speakers are using is what is responsible for the hum. They don't have much in their circuitry in the power adapter or inside the speakers on their board(s) to suppress that, and sometimes one of those components fails.
If it sounds like a constant 50 cycle (if your AC is 240 volt) or 60 cycle (if your AC is 120 volt) hum, that's probably the cause.

"However I went into the audio window and was able for the first time to move the volume control. I did nothing. What made it work now? "

If you haven't re-installed the audio adapter's software, I have no idea, unless the original speaker''s amplifier circuitry was damaged - you should have been able to change the volume at any time.

Are you sure you were using the right AC to DC adapter with the original speakers ? If you're not sure, I know from experience that if you use a power adapter that has the right voltage but the opposite polarity at the DC plug, some amplified speakers have no protection against that (a diode) and their amplifier circuitry is fried instantly.
You may have the same result when the DC voltage is too high when the polarity is right.

Thanks for the thanks and the bless you. .


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#12
April 28, 2012 at 09:13:59
I just pulled apart the old speaker and found ac where dc should be. That was the cause. The same speaker was used- correct polarity at all times- wonder why the restoring session fried a diode. I wasn't able to move the volume control on the audio window because each time I attempted to reset another window asking for the type of audio system used (Realtek) I would reset it but it would instantly revert to a default condition (as a result of detecting a faulty speaker with hum). With a new speaker installed it retained the correct specified audio system. Strange but interesting. You're just wonderful. Would you consider getting a piano so that I could help you?

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#13
April 28, 2012 at 10:16:07
Some amplified speakers have (an) amplifier circuit board(s) that has (have) an additional small diode inline (that isn't needed otherwise) on one side of the power input connection from the DC source, some don't . If that (those) diode(s) is (are) there, the circuit board(s) can't be damaged by the power adapter having the wrong polarity at the DC plug.

If the speakers had that, the circuits could have been damaged due to other causes, such as from a power spike or power surge, or a static electricity discharge, or the power adapter has malfunctioned or has been damaged such that it's putting out AC instead of DC voltage. (I've never come across amplified speakers meant for use with computers that have an AC to AC power adapter, but that's possible, and it's possible they could have a direct AC cord instead, more likely if the speakes have a subwoofer enclosure.)
Some can even be damaged if you don't have the AC to DC power adapter powered off when you plug that into the amplified speakers.

It sounds like Windows and/or the sound adapter's software could not properly deal with whatever was wrong with the speaker's amplifier circuitry.

Newer audio chipsets often have more than one possible use for the 1/8" jacks . The audio adapter's software may pop up a baloon message asking you which type of device you have connected to a port after you have first plugged it in, but that doesn't normally happen when you have plugged in just a pair of speakers into the light green 1/8" jack, or the headphones jack on a laptop or netbook or on the front of a desktop case. If you have more than just a pair of speakers to connect, you usually must change a setting in Control Panel - the icon for for the adapter's software settings, and specify how many speakers you are connecting, otherwise it's set by default for a pair of speakers, even when you have told the software's balloon message which device is plugged into which port.
When those settings have been set, Windows and the sound adapter's software retains those settings for the same Windows installation as long as what is plugged in has not changed while booting the computer and there's nothing wrong with whatever is pliugged in. .

We used to have a piano years ago but we sold it cheap, or gave it away, I forget which. We would have been grateful if we had gotten a free or a reduced cost tuneup for that. It had a cracked sound board as I recall.

My reward is the satisfaction I get from having actually helped someone solve their problem(s), whatever it is that has a problem - computers, vehicles, construction or carpentry related, whatever.



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