load needed DLLs from kernel error

January 25, 2011 at 17:36:35
Specs: Windows XP Home Edition
I have an older eMachine desktop with I guess a pre-installed Windows XP Home Edition OS which was working fine until I got this message "Load needed DLLs for kernel". A while back you gave some great advice, but when I went to use the restore discs that came with the computer, I have been told after two years they are no good to use to boot from the cd-rom. I was also told there is a way around this. Anybody, please please help. I need to get some important files off this computer. A friend gave me a XP Pro version. Can I use this to go through the steps you described?

See More: load needed DLLs from kernel error

Report •


#1
January 25, 2011 at 17:48:43
If the main concern is getting your files off the HD then you can do this with a Live Linux CD by burning an image (ISO) on another machine. I happen to use Puppy Linux for this. Although the dud machine then runs Linux from the CD only, you can "access the HD files" and put them onto a flash drive. You have to ensure the boot order is set to see the CD before the HD on the faulty machine then just boot with the CD in the drive. Everything is single click and I normally use drag and drop to get the files. It's a handy tool.

We all live on a ball.


Report •

#2
February 8, 2011 at 01:19:00
I put the Ubuntu live CD and it is booting it but now only half the page shows up on the desk top. I can see a full page when it is in Menu mode but goes back to half page when I want to use Ubuntu without installing. Lunix is not easy for newbies. LOL. I can not cut and paste commands because I can not get past the top screen. I finally figured out how to get into the terminal menu and make the fonts smaller so I ca do a few commands. Ugh! Need help fast and furious.

Report •

#3
February 8, 2011 at 06:18:54
Sorry, I've not used Ubuntu - someone on the Linux forum should be able to help. I use Puppy because it is particularly easy - I've never run into the half page desktops you mentioned.

If you decide to try Puppy I will be able to help.

We all live on the same ball.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
February 8, 2011 at 09:58:27
I will try Puppy. Is it a free download? I am extremely strapped and really need to get these files. I paid for a live disk else where and getting the half page. when it starts there is a full page and when I bring the main menu there is a full page. I will search the Internet for Puppy. thank you and I will get back to you with the results.

Report •

#5
February 8, 2011 at 11:45:21
Do you know the names of which DLLs are missing ?
If you do, there are hidden backup copies of many of them already on the hard drive.

"....when I went to use the restore discs that came with the computer, I have been told after two years they are no good to use to boot from the cd-rom. ...."

Huh?

Emachines computers do not normally come with Restore disks. However, I've seen that sometimes you were required to make a Restore disk set when the computer was new before you could use Windows otherwise, or that may not have been mandatory but the computer had the emachines supplied program already on it to make it and someone may have made a set with that program.

What was the problem ?
Did you even try to read them ?

If they're CDs , not DVDs, you can boot the first disk in the set from any optical drive, if the Boot Order or similar settings in your mboard's bios have CD-rom or similar listed before a hard drive.

If they're DVDs, not CDs, the same applies, except the optical drive has to be able to read DVDs

However, you probably don't need to run (boot from) the Restore disk set to extract Windows files from it.


The data on burned disks does not last forever, but only two years is very much NOT likely.

You can buy better burnable CDs or DVDs that are "archival" grade, or that are meant for are storing photo files, that are warrantied to keep their data intact for a lot longer for not much more money.

CD-R disks, and DVD-R disks if the drive can read DVDs, will work fine in more optical drives than any other types of burned disks - other types of burned disks may not read properly in a drive they were not made in. I HAVE seen that CD-RW disks may read fine for 3 years or so, but then they don't read fine in SOME drives after that.
......

Even if you can no longer get your Recovery disk set disks to read properly, you can often still buy the set.

Go here:
http://www.emachines.com/support/

Scroll down.

Accessories - Purchase Accessories, eRecovery CDs....

If a disk or set of disks is available, it's usually MUCH cheaper to buy including shipping than buying merely the cheapest type of XP CD available - an OEM XP Home CD.
..........

"A friend gave me a XP Pro version. Can I use this to go through the steps you described?"

For the Restore or Recovery disk set for most brand name system computers I've seen that have XP Home or Pro on them, the first disk is merely a slightly modified OEM XP CD - you can use it the same way as a regular OEM XP CD of the same version, Home or Pro.

Whether you can use someone else's CD depends on what you need to do .

If your computer has XP Pro on it, you CAN use someone elses's XP Pro CD to run a Repair installation of Windows, or to install Windows from scratch, if ....
- it did NOT come with a different brand name computer model as an XP re-installation CD or similar.
- it is a regular Microsoft OEM XP Pro CD - it has "For distribution with a new PC only." printed on it and it has the Microsoft holograms, you can use the Product Key on the official Microsoft label that's on the outside of you case with it.

If you just need to copy Windows files off the CD, or to try running commands in the Recovery Console to Repair Windows, then you can probably do that with any XP CD other than an XP Pro 64bit one, although it may need to be the same version - Home or Pro - as on your hard drive.

If you computer has an XP MCE version, that's whole different situation.


Report •

#6
February 8, 2011 at 13:29:35
Tubesand wires you have been so helpful. I just went to the Puppy Lunix site and I am getting ready to burn the .iso files. I may have to make some adjustments because they want me to burn a 4x. I appreciate your prompt response and patience.

The issue with the booting from the restore disk of eMachines was I was not sure I would have to clean boot and wipe my files and documents off my hard drive. The first step is to try any live cd that will help me accomplish that task. what has been happening now is this monitor problem of half a black screen. I am not comfortable writing commands. I am really hoping Puppy will work. Thanks again and I will post a new reply in a few.


Report •

#7
February 8, 2011 at 13:42:07
Re #4

Yep, Puppy is free. It would be as well to get your important stuff off first, then fix the machine if possible. It is useful to have such a CD in your toolkit.

We all live on the same ball.


Report •

#8
February 8, 2011 at 14:46:06
"The issue with the booting from the restore disk of eMachines was I was not sure I would have to clean boot and wipe my files and documents off my hard drive."

There are two common types of Restore or Recovery disk sets.

As I said in response 5....
"For the Restore or Recovery disk set for most brand name system computers I've seen that have XP Home or Pro on them, the first disk is merely a slightly modified OEM XP CD - you can use it the same way as a regular OEM XP CD of the same version, Home or Pro. "

That's the most common type I've seen for brand name system computers that have XP Home or Pro on them. The first disk in the set does NOT prompt you to insert other disks in the set. The other disks are usually not bootable, and they have the Drivers you need for your model, and sometimes they also have Applications (programs) that were included in the brand name software installation that do not come with Windows. All of the disks usually have multiple folders and files on them when you examine the disks.

In that case, the first disk has identical files and folders in comparison to those on a regular Windows disk that has the same SP updates version, or no SP updates, except the internal contents of some OEM.* files are different on the brand name's disk, and the brand name's disk has a few less folders with a small number of files in them that aren't needed. It has a LARGE \I386 folder on it. You CAN copy individual files from that \I386 folder.

With that type of first disk, you can run a Repair installation of XP just like you can with a regular OEM XP CD, and not lose any of the personal data you have added the the partition Windows is on, which is usually, but not always, seen as C in Windows.
.....

The other type of Restore or Recovery disk set is a type more commonly used on older computers that did not have XP on them. It's a set of disks, where the first one is bootable, the first disk prompts you to insert the second disk etc. , and when you look at the disks usually there are very few files on the first disk, and there is a major huge file on each disk that nearly fills the disk, except the one on the last disk may not nearly fill the disk, and all but the first disk may have only 1 file. It's, in effect, a multi disk backup archive file.
When you boot from the first disk in that set, usually you have no other choice except to install the original brand name software installation again along with Windows, or you may be able to install Windows from scratch - all your personal data you have added to the partition Windows was on will be deleted, unless you take steps to copy the personal data you do not want to lose to elsewhere BEFORE you run the program.
There is probably NO \I386 folder on any of the disks.
You probably cannot copy individual Windows files from that type of disk set.


Report •

#9
February 8, 2011 at 19:58:17
I installed Puppy and still getting half screen. Very frustrated, but will not give up. I do not know the video card I am running but when Puppy first installed full screen on the boot up, but when it gets to desk top I get half a screen. This is happening with all the live CDs. So it is not the particular system per say. I know I am getting full screen in other "modes". Well now that I have Puppy maybe I can get to my XP windows files. I look forward to hearing from you.

Report •

#10
February 8, 2011 at 21:58:30
Are you still getting DLL related error messages ?

What do you mean when you state "half screen" ?


Report •

#11
February 9, 2011 at 08:10:08
Yes, that half screen confused me too - Linux should produce a full desktop with icons. Can it be made full by using the Maximise button (same as in XP)? It has screen settings on bootup which if you have not Saved can be changed, although I have not usually found it very fussy. It seems odd that you also had the same issue with another Linux. Was it apparent on XP?

To get your files off you pop in your Flash Drive. At the bottom left of the screen you will see all your drives, including the HD and Flash Drive. If you click the HD (once) you should all the HD files. It is then a matter of following the paths until you find your important data. The paths are real (no handy My Documents shortcut). So you have to go via Documents and Settings > user name > My Documents. I've usually found that drag and drop onto the Flash Drives works well - getting two Windows up for convenience. Is your half screen adequate enough to do this?

You will need to experiment a bit but it should shake out.

See the question at #10 about DLL related error messages.

We all live on the same ball.


Report •

Ask Question