Is there a way to repair scratched CD discs?

Dell / Latitude d510
January 27, 2011 at 19:07:24
Specs: Windows XP, 798 MHz / 1015 MB
Is there a tool to repair damaged CD's so that they don't skip when played?

See More: Is there a way to repair scratched CD discs?

Report •

#1
January 27, 2011 at 19:11:53
Short answer is no. Even if you use nail polish or some reflective sharpe type of pen or paint it will still have some problem.

"The era of big government is over," said Clinton 1996


Report •

#2
Report •

#3
January 28, 2011 at 13:30:44
So that they won't skip when played?? No there is no repair to fix a cd so that it won't skip. The data is gone. You can't replicate it.

"The era of big government is over," said Clinton 1996


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
January 28, 2011 at 14:58:22
There is a big difference between scuffed and scratched. Scuffed will stop a read but is repairable. A deep enough scratch damages the data area though a number of "scratches" can be buffed out.

I have used a product called skipdoctor cd repair to buff out scuffs. I have used this on disks that could not be read but after a couple of passes are read just fine.

Well worth the money I spent on it years ago.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

#5
January 28, 2011 at 15:35:55
It depends on how deep the scratches are. The actual material that holds the data is closer the the top of the CD when it is in the drive. The bottom side is just transparent plastic. Any scratches in this plastic will deflect the laser beam leading to read errors.

As Wanderer says, if you can buff out the scratches you can effect a repair. I have used metal polish to good effect in the past as well as toothpaste. Anything slightly abrasive should do it. When you have done with the metal polish wash in plain soapy water will get rid of any grease and residue from the buffing process. Dry with a lint free cloth. Not a bath towel, it is too course. A T-shirt is perfect.

Try it, it is surprising how effective it can be.

Stuart


Report •

#6
January 28, 2011 at 17:06:51
I've sometime found, surprising though it might sound, that if you copy the disk that goes well and the copy doesn't skip. Copy at the lowest speed possible.

The other possibility is to create an image using Virtual Dub (free version will do) then create a new CD from the image.

We all live on a ball.


Report •

#7
January 28, 2011 at 17:15:33
The ability to read a scratched disk in a particular optical drive varies greatly - e.g. LG drives are not good regarding that - Plextor drives are much better regarding that.

Report •

#8
January 28, 2011 at 17:31:35
I've sometime found, surprising though it might sound, that if you copy the disk that goes well and the copy doesn't skip. Copy at the lowest speed possible.

This is becasue that when a CD is created there is a lot of redundant information recorded. The copy process can make use of this redundant information making multiple tries till it gets all the information. The copy will then be near perfect.

When playing the disk back in real time this is not always possible and leads to skipping.

Stuart


Report •

#9
January 28, 2011 at 19:35:47
If we knew more about the damage a best guess of the above may be found.
We assume it is music I think.

A bottom side scuff or scrape may be fixed in some cases as wanderer suggests.

Copying it to some other media may work too.

If you hold up the cd to the light and see through to the light then I have never been able to get them to work correctly no matter what.

"The era of big government is over," said Clinton 1996


Report •

#10
January 29, 2011 at 08:53:55
jefro

Too true, the recording is made just under the label, so if that is scratched or missing you have no chance. Scratches on the transparent side only deflect the beam so can often be buffed out.

We all live on a ball.


Report •

Ask Question