Solved I ran a MemTest86 and the screen turned red on the first pas

June 2, 2014 at 05:11:55
Specs: Windows XP, Windows XP 2.40 gigahertz AMD Athlon 64,
Windows XP
2.40 gigahertz AMD Athlon 64
128 kilobyte primary memory cache
512 kilobyte secondary memory cache
3584 Megabytes Installed Memory, Kingston PC2-6400 Cl5 240
Multiple kernel faults, then crash

I haven't had problems that suggest ram failure except I can't stop the machine from crashing.

I've installed several versions of drivers, from the Mobo company, the chip manufacturer. etc. Can't work out what's wrong. I've also run several virus disinfection protocols.

Thanks for what help you can give me.


See More: I ran a MemTest86 and the screen turned red on the first pas

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✔ Best Answer
June 2, 2014 at 11:59:03
As posted above, Burnish the RAM module contacts and run again. I you still receive errors then remove all but 1 stick of RAM and run memtest86+ again. Repeat, testing each module alone.

Sometimes the contacts on the RAM and motherboard are different metals, which accelerates oxidation.

You can also rub the memory contacts with a pencil eraser in addition to the burnishing.

Note that memtest86 and memtest86+ are NOT the same test.



#1
June 2, 2014 at 05:40:51
So, did memtest86 say you have a memory failure?

Try snapping each of your RAM sticks in and out 4 or 5 times to burnish the contacts. Then run memtest86+. Of course, do not remove the RAM while the computer in plugged in and exercise anti-static precautions.


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#2
June 2, 2014 at 06:19:54
If MemTest86 says you have bad RAM, then you likely have bad RAM. Swap out modules until memory tests come out clean, and replace whichever DIMM you don't have in the system.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#3
June 2, 2014 at 07:17:27
Trying several version of different drivers on the off chance you might just stumble across one that works is a very good way to crash a computer.

The only driver is the right one and there is plenty of information around to tell you which is the right one. A machine that is constantly crashing is a very good indication of RAM failure.

As razor says, if MemTest86 says you have bad RAM then you have bad RAM

Stuart


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Related Solutions

#4
June 2, 2014 at 10:28:09
See the following article. Basically, if the lower portion of the memtest screen remains blue, the RAM is OK. If it's red, the RAM is bad. And all the info about the failed RAM is right on the screen:

http://pcdigger.com/test-your-pc-me...


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#5
June 2, 2014 at 11:55:54
Do you know if you're running the 32 or 64 bit version of XP? That's quite a bit of ram for XP and it should run OK but if it's the 32 bit version you're on the cusp of having problems due to too much ram. So you may want to drop the ram to around 1 or 1.5 gig and see how your system behaves. And if you do have some actual bad ram that may be a way to isolate the bad stick.

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#6
June 2, 2014 at 11:59:03
✔ Best Answer
As posted above, Burnish the RAM module contacts and run again. I you still receive errors then remove all but 1 stick of RAM and run memtest86+ again. Repeat, testing each module alone.

Sometimes the contacts on the RAM and motherboard are different metals, which accelerates oxidation.

You can also rub the memory contacts with a pencil eraser in addition to the burnishing.

Note that memtest86 and memtest86+ are NOT the same test.


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#7
June 2, 2014 at 12:36:55
Memtest86 is new to me and I'm not certain about interpreting the results, but in the top half of the screen it said failure and gave an address. I ran the test twice, the first time with the computer intact, the second time with the hard drive removed. I was concerned that bad ram could write garbled data to/corrupt my hard drive. I'll put on my ground strap and clean the contacts. Thanks.

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#8
June 2, 2014 at 13:01:41
Thanks for the hint about asking questions the smart way. I've been working on my PC for several weeks, first to disinfect after virus attacks, then trying to isolate the cause of repeated crashes. Even now I'm not positive that I've completely cleaned the machine, but the frequency of crashes slowed by changing drivers. Almost all of the crashes were UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP. This reason led me to search of updates for the NVidia SATA Performance Driver. Checking with a number of forums pointed me to the mother board mfgr for the most reliable driver. With each drive change I uninstalled the existing one before installing the new one.
The most recent crashes were PFN_LIST_CORRUPT. Checking with similar queries at Tom's Hardware led me to suspect my RAM.
I know I'm at the outer edge on my knowledge at this point so I decided to install new hard drives--more than one computer is involved,but my question is about only one, then install Windows 7.

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#9
June 2, 2014 at 13:11:58
Thanks. The drivers I tried were ones recommended by NVidia. It was dicey getting a clear recommendation because the mobo is old, so they only recommended a generic covering several past models. I finally got to a forum that pointed my to the maker of the mobo. A tech there sent me the driver I'm using now. The crashes seemed to have stopped then began again. This time instead of unexpected kernel mode trap, the cause according to Blue Screen View was PFN list corrupt. I followed a thread on Tom's Hardware similar to the problem I was having and it pointed to possible RAM failure. That's when I ran Memtest86 and got a failure in during the first pass. Continuing the test led to more failures.
I'd like to isolate the faulty stick(s) because they've got lifetime warranties.

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#10
June 2, 2014 at 13:35:30
Thanks. I read the positing you listed. My next step is to remove the RAM leaving only one stick and test each one. This will take time, so I won't be back to the forum until the testing is done.
I can't judge which is the best reply since all of them contain valuable information. If I'd just gotten to the forum and was looking for answers to a similar problem. I'd read all of them. then start testing my RAM.
BTW Since I can boot up the test with the computer as is, I don't see a need to install a hard drive until I know more about the RAM condition.

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#11
June 2, 2014 at 13:48:30
Hi Dave,
Could problems with too much RAM be cumulative. I've been running XP with 4GB of RAM since June 2007?
Thanks

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#12
June 2, 2014 at 14:05:08
I doubt too much RAM creates any cumulative affect. Everything points to bad RAM but it might only be one stick (or the contacts as given). When you think you've got it sorted the RAM test should run through - if it doesn't you still have issues.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#13
June 2, 2014 at 15:58:09
I only brought up the 'too much ram' issue because you were close to the problem area for 32 bit XP. And I'm not necessarily saying if that was an issue that it would show as bad ram in a memtest scan. I don't know. But it's easy enough to check--just temporarily pull some ram.

As Derek says, there wouldn't be an cummulative affect but hardware or software changes might cause it to appear on a system that previously worked OK with 4 gig of ram.


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#14
June 2, 2014 at 16:23:12
Derek and Dave,
Thanks. I checked and all of the RAM shows in the BIOS. I'll start the test first with all of the RAM, then with one stick at a time. I'll come back to the forum when I have some results. And thanks again to all.

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#15
June 2, 2014 at 18:10:21
I found on bad RAM stick. It failed on the second pass, almost immediately. I'm installing the other sticks and will run a lengthy test to see if a flaw shows up later. Thanks again for your help. I had read in several forums that I needed to test my RAM, but none of them offered a test method like yours. I have another computer with boot up failures. Now I know how to test it and eliminate the bad stick. I'm very fortunate to have landed here. It looks like my problem is not a virus infection. I am ready for you to close this thread.

message edited by calal2sd941


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#16
June 2, 2014 at 19:09:06
Thanks for posting back and letting us know. I hope that's the only bad one you find.

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#17
June 3, 2014 at 08:06:12
That's good news - hope it stays working now.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#18
June 3, 2014 at 15:14:53
Most RAM is Warranted. Some for life. Check the website for your module and if under warranty contact them for instructions.

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#19
June 4, 2014 at 02:20:56
I found that I still have the containers the RAM sticks came in and they are warranted for life. I'll contact Kingston to make use of the warranty. I appreciate the help that you've given me and I wrote to several friends to tell about the site.

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