Solved How to boot to C drive instead of automatic boot to WIN XP

June 28, 2014 at 09:15:58
Specs: Windows XP
I have not been able to understand how to implement the help suggestions to my previous request - http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...
- to fix my corrupt boot to WIN XP. I did understand the suggestion of going to my C drive directly and transferring the whole of it's data content to a stand-alone backup drive via USB. This is what I'd like more help to do. Is there a more direct way of getting C access without having to use the ISIS method which I could not get to work. Please let me know of a simpler method of accessing my C: drive if there is one.

I'm sorry to be needing such basic level help, my 80 year old memory is so failed :-(

Luigi


See More: How to boot to C drive instead of automatic boot to WIN XP

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✔ Best Answer
June 29, 2014 at 01:51:23
If you have an actual Linux Mint disk, (or an Ubuntu version) already then that will likely boot the system as is. It will not include an ISO and you won't need to go looking for the Ubuntu version (the version we suggested you download as an ISO).

Try booting your computer with the Linux Mint disk.

Possibly when you attempt to do this, you may get a message on the screen telling to press (or not) a key to boot from the cd/dvd. You do what is required, what it says to boot that way. Possibly you won't get that "message" - and you will have to change the boot order in the bios/setup area of your computer. To get across that... Have a look here - a pictorial "how to":

http://m.wikihow.com/Boot-a-Compute...

But first try booting as is with the cd/dvd.

Once you have managed to boot that way look for the hard drive, and your files.

Daveincaps... (well sort of...) I frequently would set up my XP systems with a basic '98se in a dual-boot, and ensured the data area was fat32 - shared by both XP & 98se. Thus allowing data access more easily in event of problems. Although of course there is the ntfsdos utility too which will work from a dos level/based OS.



#1
June 28, 2014 at 10:26:26
mmm - Can appreciate that sometimes things can seem (and at times be) a little complicated...

Not understanding what you mean by ISIS method?

What you need to do is to somehow get hold a disk that will boot the system - and the usual suggestion is a Linux based disk.

You obviously have access to a computer that works?

So you go to a website (ubuntu.com is one) and locate/download the ISO file there for Ubuntu. Then you put a blank DVD into the cd/dvd burner - and with the correct software you burn the ISO to the dvd. (Almost certainly whichever computer you use for the download will have suitably software to allow to burn the dvd).

Then you boot "your" Dell with that DVD. It will (after a little while) boot up to a desktop. There is an equivalent of Windows Explorer in the Ubuntu operating system; and with that you can find the C: drive on your computer. Then you locate your files and "copy" them to external storage - typically dvd. Very likely when you select a file via the Ubuntu "Windows Explorer" equivalent and right-click on it it will give the option to copy the file to a cd/dvd; and it may actually suggest to a cd/dvd. It does offer cd/dvd then do so - and burn file(s) to cd/dvd. DVD is better as more space to store files?

To connect the hard drive via an adapter to usb to another computer does mean you have to physically remove the drive from the Dell - first. Then connect it with the cable to the computer you will use to access and copy the files.

The Ubuntu boot disk routine is by far the easier and less messing around?


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#2
June 28, 2014 at 14:46:17
I'm not sure if this will help but it answers your original question about booting to the c: drive instead of going into windows:

Turn on the computer and before windows starts loading start tapping F8. A boot menu should come up. Choose 'safe mode with command prompt'. That will leave you at the c:\> prompt. Command prompt works like dos--if you're familiar with that--allowing you to use XCOPY and other commands.

But as I said, I don't know if that will help in getting your data transferred.


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#3
June 28, 2014 at 14:53:18
The problem is I think that it won't boot even to F8... The system32 config error has cropped up - as per the original post here:

http://tinyurl.com/qb5feqh


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Related Solutions

#4
June 28, 2014 at 19:30:41
Hi trvir,

Thanks for suggestions. I mistakenly called ISO, ISI in my report that I couldn't get it to work. I was not able to understand the lingo around first downloading the ubuntu program that contains the ISO program. I have zip knowledge on how to operate Linux and step back in terror that even if do download the ISO program I might press the wrong button and destroy my personal data while trying to copy it from XP files.

I did purchase a disk to load the Linux Mint operating system but I don't know if it contains the ISO program?

I did try the F8 intervention during booting my XP but the "safe mode" option was not there and none of the other alternative boots were functional either. I guess your comment about the syst 32 corrupt error is also in the F8 option paths.

I might try getting the ISO program if you know whether it would be contained in either the Linux Mint or the Ubuntu V.14.04, 32 bit program (I have disks for this too). I would have to try it out on a 3rd computer that has no personal info to see if I'll get to know how to handle Linux.

Also, I do have an old set of floppy disks for loading Microsoft MS DOS 6. Does it make any sense to try loading DOS on my WIN XP computer or would the syst 32 corruption block even DOS from getting to the C: drive directly.

Or might there be still another way to get to C: ??

Thanks again for your support,

Luigi


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#5
June 28, 2014 at 20:27:02
Dos 6 wouldn't do you any good as it only will recognize and install on fat16 partitions. Likely your XP is on an NTFS partition, although if your XP is on a fat32 partition you can use a windows 98 boot disk to access it. I specifically set up an older XP system that way so I could use a 98 bootdisk if necessary to access files.

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#6
June 29, 2014 at 01:51:23
✔ Best Answer
If you have an actual Linux Mint disk, (or an Ubuntu version) already then that will likely boot the system as is. It will not include an ISO and you won't need to go looking for the Ubuntu version (the version we suggested you download as an ISO).

Try booting your computer with the Linux Mint disk.

Possibly when you attempt to do this, you may get a message on the screen telling to press (or not) a key to boot from the cd/dvd. You do what is required, what it says to boot that way. Possibly you won't get that "message" - and you will have to change the boot order in the bios/setup area of your computer. To get across that... Have a look here - a pictorial "how to":

http://m.wikihow.com/Boot-a-Compute...

But first try booting as is with the cd/dvd.

Once you have managed to boot that way look for the hard drive, and your files.

Daveincaps... (well sort of...) I frequently would set up my XP systems with a basic '98se in a dual-boot, and ensured the data area was fat32 - shared by both XP & 98se. Thus allowing data access more easily in event of problems. Although of course there is the ntfsdos utility too which will work from a dos level/based OS.


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#7
June 29, 2014 at 03:42:43
Thanks a million trvlr, I'm reading up the instructions for Mint and will try booting my XP as soon as I get my understanding and courage up. Have a great day.

Luigi


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#8
June 29, 2014 at 08:00:57
Most Linux distros are free. All you need to do is download the entire operating system in .ISO format, then burn it to a DVD using software such as ImgBurn (or similar). Once you've created the disk, you can boot off it & run a live session without even installing it. You'll also have the option to install Linux from within the live session.

If you install ImgBurn, pay close attention during the install process & do NOT let any of the bundled software install along with it:

http://www.filehippo.com/download_i...

The latest version of Mint (Mint 17 “Qiana”) is based on the latest LTS (Long Term Support) version of Ubuntu & will be supported until 2019. But there are several different "flavors" - Cinnamon, Mate, KDE, or Xfce. And there's 32-bit & 64-bit versions of all of them too. The best version will depend on your hardware configuration. Xfce has the lowest system requirements & will work best on older machines with just 1GB RAM.

http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=2656


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#9
June 29, 2014 at 08:22:44
LuigiM: - echoing Riider's advice when installing IMG software (or any downloaded software other for that matter)...

Never accept any offer of an automatic (or whatever) installation when installing software downloaded off the web... Always opt for "custom" installation - invariably the second "tick" box that is left "unticked" as "they will have already "ticked" the automatic option for you.

Then as you work your way through the "custom" option you will find assorted "useful" extras - all of which you don't want; and will need to uncheck/disable their installation. Just ensure you only instal the actual utility/software you downloaded, and nothing else. That way you avoid acquiring assorted junk, pests, and changes to your browser, search engine etc...


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#10
June 29, 2014 at 11:09:28
Hi trvlr,

Still no luck :-( I did download the Mint start-up file on my portable hard drive and then connected it to my WIN XP Dell Computer. Booting did not recognize anything on the USB in. I then tried XPs "Boot Device Menue"

This is it:
WIN XP on DELL 8400

Boot Device Menue

* Onboard or USB Floppy Drive
* Intel Array
* Onboard or USB CD-ROM Drive
* USB Device*

* System Setup
* Hard Drive Diagnostics
* Boot to Utility Partition

Use Up/Down Arrows to Highlight Desired Item
Use Enter to select Highlited Item

None of these connected to the hard drive and I could not call load the start-up file into XP.

Is there something else I can try ?

Thanks Luigi


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#11
June 29, 2014 at 11:23:55
when you enter the setup/bios area and come the boot order section... you found this:

* Onboard or USB Floppy Drive
* Intel Array
* Onboard or USB CD-ROM Drive
* USB Device* move the

If using a cd/dvd to boot into Mint... You need to move the third item (onboard or usb CD-ROM drive) to the top - so as to be first boot device. Then exit saving the change...

Then you close out insert the Mint Linux (or Ubuntu) CD/DVD you have; and restart the system to enable it to boot from that cd/dvd.

You will NOT be installing"anything" to the hard drive; the Linux based OS will load itself into RAM only. It will take a wee while to do so.

If using the usb external hard drive - you move the fourth item to the top...

However I do not think you will be able to boot that way into Mint. Typically one boots Linux either from a cd/dvd or it is actually installed onto the hard drive (like Windows) and then you boot up that way. at this time you DO NOT want to install anything on the Dell hard drive; merely to boot the system with a cd/dvd containing a Linux variant.

So if you have a Linux variant cd/dvd - boot with that (third item in the list of four goes to the top - to become the first boot-device in the system).

The way it all works is that - whichever item is first in the boot list is checked to see if it will boot the system. If it will then that's what happens. If it isn't able to boot from the first item in the list, then the second item is checked to see if it will; and if not then the third - and so on until all four devices have been tried...

Again - unless you are going to run a repair installation (as per the Michael Stevens guide in earlier posts here) you do NOT install or write "anything" to the Dell hard drive...


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#12
June 29, 2014 at 15:50:05
"Use Up/Down Arrows to Highlight Desired Item
Use Enter to select Highlited Item"

1: Do so.
2: Insert the CD into your device.
3: Press F10 to save setting ( may be different on your Dell )

message edited by Johnw


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#13
July 1, 2014 at 10:22:22
Hi trvlr & Johnw: I did your instructions carefully following your directions but WIN XP just never ever ends up other than with no attempt to run in C: or anything else.

I've decided to check whether the hard drive can be swapped to another old DEL (Inspiron) and if same plugs I wIll try it.

Will let you Know,
Luigi


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