Solved how do i add a DOS OS to a windows based computer?

October 21, 2015 at 12:31:07
Specs: Windows XP
how do i add DOS OS to a windows XP based computer? Existing computer has XP OS and I would like to partition so I have a place to run basic DOS word processing related software.

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#1
October 21, 2015 at 18:38:32
See if this will work for you: http://www.howtogeek.com/104725/how...

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#2
October 21, 2015 at 21:49:20
Quite difficult to partition after the fact to the point of being impossible, all dependent on target machine specs and DOS version/program desired which are unknowns. Because you didn't say. There is a way and it requires modifying the procedure found here to suit your needs. Best of luck.
http://www.dougknox.com/xp/tips/xp_...

Lee


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#3
October 22, 2015 at 02:38:05
✔ Best Answer
riider's suggestion of DOSBox is likely the safest way to go, but don't be surprised if printing may not work. Printing from DOS (actually Command Prompt) can be hit-or-miss depending on the program. You could always just save the file and print from a Windows program that can read the file. Or if it's just basic word-processing you want, then a Windows-based office-suite can be had for free:

http://www.libreoffice.org

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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Related Solutions

#4
October 22, 2015 at 04:27:19
Have you tried running the software in Compatibility mode on the XP partition?

If that doesn't work, I too would go with DosBox


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#5
October 22, 2015 at 09:30:01
Thanks to all. I will apply these suggestions as I continue seeking out a local tech minded person to help me with this. My challenge, and dependence, is that I have thousands of reference notes & citations from teaching on a bibliography program suite ("NoteBook" & "Bibliography") tailored ham fistedly to writing using DOS WordStar, version 7. WordStar is an old program but great for self-taught typists. I am now a retired teacher hoping to repurpose these notes into future written products. So the journey continues.... Thanks again, Bill

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#6
October 22, 2015 at 10:53:47
It may be easier to just convert the files, either to plain text (or HTML): http://www.softpedia.com/get/Office... or to Word: http://sfwriter.com/2008/07/quick-v...

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#7
October 22, 2015 at 11:49:11
This might help too: http://www.ehow.com/how_6788983_ope...

message edited by beachyhbt


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#8
October 22, 2015 at 18:33:11
This may be of some help as well:

http://www.wordstar.org/

Also, if you have data on floppy disk, then you may have problems trying to read them. Magnetic media wasn't designed to last >20 years.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#9
October 22, 2015 at 18:54:20
If it's a desktop another option would be to install dos on a separate drive. Or find an older computer you could use as dos-only.

What dos version were you hoping to use?


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#10
October 22, 2015 at 19:47:32
T-R-A touches on a very good point about floppy data storage, in my experience Windows is lousy at this so I only access such treasures from boot to DOS mode on a 9x machine. I have to disagree with T-R-A though on the permissible time line there. I am still using data from the mid 80s and it's flawless. It is also 180K single sided 5 1/4 though, which may or may not be a bit more robust than the 3.5 inch floppy.

Lee


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#11
October 23, 2015 at 08:04:35
Yeah, I never had much trouble with floppies either despite everyone saying they were unreliable. I found CD-RW were far worse, collapsing at the drop of a hat.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#12
October 23, 2015 at 08:49:37
I have used virtual box with great success as well. you can even use virtual floppies.

::mike


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#13
October 23, 2015 at 15:49:41
Never said that there was a permissible time for floppies, just meant that most people generally don't store them properly---meaning it's unlikely that they'll last much longer than 10-15 years. I also have some from the late 80's that still can be read, but I keep them cool and dry and "out of harm's way" (dust/magnetic fields). Where I work, they had stored some quite "haphazardly" and when we needed some, it took 15 of those to successfully format 4 (to create Win2K boot floppies). Oddly enough, the most failure-prone floppies that I have dealt with seem to be 3M and the least failure-prone seem to be the "generics".

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#14
October 23, 2015 at 20:07:43
ever heard of virtualbox? I use Windows XP as a guest OS in my Peppermint 5 as host OS. Its fun, no partitioning/mbr problems at all. Create a virtual HDD and you're good to go. Since in your case the host OS is Windows XP, Install Virtualbox for windows and keep the Guest Additions Cd in handy. Install it, and you're good to go. You'll know what to do next. If you feel any problem feel free to comment back, I'll be happy to help :)

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