First Sectors Of HDD Look Odd (Post 1)

January 2, 2014 at 12:03:00
Specs: Windows XP 64-Bit, Intel Quad/4096
So all of my hard disks have a very similar sector 0 that reads like I posted in the picture.

postimg.org/image/3m7xfkv2n/

I know they're all supposed to start with NTFS, not that odd looking start-up.
All the hard disks state that they have 4 different partitions, which is incorrect; they all only have one partition.

Suppose I set Offset 00000001B8-1BB to read as 00 00 00 00,
will that keep the hard disk readable, to where I don't have to format it?

And also, can I go ahead and clear out all of that in the picture to 00?

Thanks


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#1
January 2, 2014 at 12:06:46
I'm not sure why you want to change anything. What exactly is your problem? Rest assured that if you make any changes to the MBR (sector 0) of a hard disk you will render it unbootable and likely lose all information on it.

It's best not to mess with things you don't understand.


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#2
January 2, 2014 at 12:51:41
See the computer always ends up messing up and having a lot of problems. There aren't any viruses or spyware and all that according to many different programs that I use to scan the computer.
Also, System Restore always messes up somehow to where I can never restore it even to the latest restore point, without any modification of any of the files in the System Volume Information folder.

This is just very annoying, wastes a lot of time whenever I try to fix all these computer problems.

Why do those first sectors show that? They shouldn't be like that. It's something I want to resolve please.


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#3
January 2, 2014 at 13:32:23
"Why do those first sectors show that? They shouldn't be like that. It's something I want to resolve please."

Yes they should be like that.

I don't know what the problem with your computer is, but you're certainly not going to fix it by trashing your partition table and boot information. Leave well enough alone and concentrate on the real problem.


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Related Solutions

#4
January 2, 2014 at 13:48:54
There is no other problem. Assuming that the hard disks are hacked in the beginning,
they are likely running hidden operating systems in the background to where if I try to fix my windows installation, i WILL be able to fix it, you're right!

But, those hidden operating systems can still access my windows installation and screw it up like they always have been doing for the past couple years.

Did research right? this is the only other site that has that weird looking serial number down there at the end of sector zero:

D210A615-ACFD-414A-EDF1-FC9F2A85F076

Look at this site. (Translate it if you have google chrome), That's what makes me suspicious to it being hacked. Also, that's the site that trells this guy to rewrite that section with 00 00 00 00. I want to do that, but I still do want the hard disk to start up.

www.gggcomputer.com/index.php?topic=15979.15

Quick question, assuming i delete everything before sector 63 (where it starts with NTFS), the hard disk should work correctly, no?
Check your hard disks for me and see if you have the same thing as mine please.



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#5
January 2, 2014 at 14:02:24
Not every byte entry on the drive is necessary. Changes to the mbr overwrite what's necessary and ignore anything left. Leftovers aren't zeroed out. It's like if you format a drive. All the data is still there but references to it are gone so when you reinstall the OS you just overwrite the old data but the file slack space for example will show entries from software previously installed there.

Yeah, bad stuff can hide in the mbr. We used to use FDISK/MBR on dos and 9x systems to reset the mbr to default. As I understand it, that zeroed out the unnecessary entries in the mbr. The equivalent command in xp is Fixmbr. I guess it works the same way.

While the mbr may contain unnecessary data, you can't tell just by looking at it if it's necessary or not.


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#6
January 2, 2014 at 14:20:01
Okay, I understand what you're saying. I tried that fixmbr many times in the past, I didn't really get too much out of it.

What I find odd is that all three separate physical hard disks show something like that in sector 0. That makes it obviously suspicious.

I want to avoid backing up all the data to a separate outside hard disk, do a manual re-format by physically setting 00s in person, to all the sectors, (formatting) through a hex editor. That would take a lot of time. It I put myself on 'patience' medications, then I would love to attempt that method, but I don't want to go back on that thought process for now.

What's up with that serial number? Help me research it. If it is irrelevant information from old software, then I should clear out that whole sector... yes?

And why does my System Restore, always crash and never work? Why are there automatic system restore points of: Software Distribution Service 3.0? This computer is only accessed by me, right?


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#7
January 2, 2014 at 14:20:58
"they are likely running hidden operating systems in the background"

Pretty amazing to see this post.

I would suggest you go ahead and delete any part of the partition information you wish. Just make sure you have a image of the disk as backup before doing so.

When your feet hit the ground again perhaps you will want to spend some time learning how all of this really works.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


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#8
January 2, 2014 at 14:21:42
"Quick question, assuming i delete everything before sector 63 (where it starts with NTFS), the hard disk should work correctly, no?"

No. You will be left with an unbootable system and a trashed hard drive. But don't take my word for it - try it and see.


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#9
January 2, 2014 at 14:29:00
"What I find odd is that all three separate physical hard disks show something like that in sector 0. That makes it obviously suspicious."

Or, just possibly, that means it's how it should be as they are all like that. (By the way, that second sector makes it look like the first one is the protective MBR for an EFI partitioned disk. You're going to have real fun if you mess with that. Have you checked that the guys whose advice you want to follow were working with that sort of partitioning?)

If you want to do something just because some guy on the Internet said to then go ahead and try it. Or you could just be sensible and leave it alone since you obviously have no idea of how a hard disk boots.

They should make people pass an exam before letting them loose with a sector editor!


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#10
January 2, 2014 at 19:01:04
Hey, I am taking in consideration what everyone's saying; yes, you know more about this than me.
But I just find it annoying when things don't work the way they're supposed to in the operating system.
Why is there an EFI partitioned disk? I remember when when all my disks used to start with NTFS written instead of all that weird stuff. It was all nice and simple. No problems with the operating system, all programs I used to run used to run smooth and non-glitchy and it was all simple. What happened?
One question that I have is still that odd looking serial number in that first sector.. what's that? I want to remove all that clutter from the disks.

My only goal is to make everything run smooth and nice without any problems. I defrag the disks and they still slightly lag. I clean out what starts up when the operating system runs, but still lag. I Need System Restore to work, because if I need to restore it back, I want to see the operation was successful.
All the disks contain this folder: System Volume Information with two files that always show up in there: MountPointManagerRemoteDatabase & tracking.log. System Restore is off for the two other disks, other than the local disk, yet this folder and two files always show up when I delete them from the two non-local disks.


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#11
January 2, 2014 at 23:09:44
"I remember when when all my disks used to start with NTFS written instead of all that weird stuff. It was all nice and simple. No problems with the operating system, all programs I used to run used to run smooth and non-glitchy and it was all simple. What happened?"

What happened is that your memory went faulty. Hard disks have had an MBR (or equivalent) in sector 0 since the days of the IBM XT.

That's enough; do whatever you wish to.


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