Finding out what app uses the disk most?

Microsoft Windows xp professional sp2 3p...
January 15, 2010 at 15:02:17
Specs: Windows XP
Hi,
I was wondering if there is any programs that can help me identify processes with highest disk activity on my system. At times my disk activity is really high for a long time, and i'd like to know what's causing it. I tried looking in task manager and trying to judge by disk read/writes but it's rather hard to keep track in task manager. So I was wondering if anyone knows of a better way to easily figure out what processes are issuing most disk accesses (whether it's due to page faults, disk read/writes, etc)

See More: Finding out what app uses the disk most?

Report •


#1
January 15, 2010 at 15:49:49
Well to begin you should list your system specifications. Windows uses a certain amount of disk space as temporary storage when there is insufficient ram to handle all the data needed at a particular time. This is the page file. The lower the amount of ram in your system , and the more intensive the task, the more use windows will make of pagefile.

This eventually leads to disk failure so to reduce wear & tear on the disk, max out your ram.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


Report •

#2
January 15, 2010 at 16:04:08
Yea that's why i had been looking at # page faults (pf delta really) in task manager, but i didn't find it super helpful all the time.
I have 4gb ram

Report •

#3
January 15, 2010 at 16:19:38
taskmanager is still the tool to look at. Only running processes that are using CPU cycles at the time can be actively accessing the drive. There are possibly 50 or 60 running processes loaded up in ram at any given time but only a few will be using CPU cycles. Open Taskmanager and in the Processes tab click on CPU in the headings until the list is shown in descending order of CPU usage. You can then see what processes are active at the time of peak drive access.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
January 15, 2010 at 16:44:11
I'd use perfmon.

See here http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/...

It would produce a much more detailed log. It can be formed by almost any metric used by the system.. It is much more detailed and versatile than taskman. It is usually better to run a log from a remote machine so you don't skew the results but can be run from same machine. Just be sure you understand both taskman and perfmon take a lot of resources.

See also tools at systernals.

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


Report •

Ask Question