files in recycler can not be deleted

Asus mother board / P5ql-e
April 4, 2012 at 17:59:24
Specs: Windows XP, quad core 2.83 GHz / 4 Gig Ram
files in recycler can not be deleted. I had windows7 on one of my drives and decided I did not like it (after spending way too much money for it), so I deleted it and went back to XP.
I deleted some Win7 files to free up that drive and now they are stuck in the recycle bin for that drive. They will not delete nor will they restore. When I try it says "access denied" and no other explanation.
Someone said to delete the whole recycle bin in "dos" mode, but that does not work either. It says, "The directory is not empty". I have "administrator" privledges, but as we all know Microsoft does not give total rights to a simple administrator, so I cannot get the files to go away.
Does anyone know of a way within windows XP (or command prompt) to make the files and directories disappear?
(Short of reformatting the drive, that is, or using Linux)

See More: files in recycler can not be deleted

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#1
April 4, 2012 at 19:10:25
Try disk cleanup feature as admin.

recycler I believe is the name for a place where many users files might be at.

A Pit Bull is like a gun you can pet. And there is no safety on it.


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#2
April 4, 2012 at 20:55:50
The disc cleanup says there are no files there. ( 0 kb) However, they are there and taking up most of the room allocated for recycle bin files... er... wait I thought of something...

Crap, that didn't work either.
What I tried: I right-clicked on the recycle bin and clicked properties. Under global, I marked 'configure drives independently' and resized the offending bin to 0% and clicked apply. I thought it would make them go away but once I restored the recycle bin, they were still there.

Oh well, it was worth a try. Hmmm, maybe I should do it again, but reboot in between... ( If you don't hear from me immediately, then it still didn't work.)


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#3
April 5, 2012 at 12:56:50
Log on as each of the users and do disk clean up.

A Pit Bull is like a gun you can pet. And there is no safety on it.


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Related Solutions

#4
April 5, 2012 at 19:06:17
There's a Recycler folder on every hard drive partition in 2000, XP, Vista, and Windows 7, but it's normally hidden. You only see it when you enable showing hidden files and folders in Folder Options - View.

You don't need to mess with it !

You delete the contents of all the Recycler folders on the computer (that were made by the same operating system installation) by emptying the Recycle Bin.
....

" I deleted some Win7 files to free up that drive..."

Why didn't you delete the whole partition Windows 7 (Windows 7 itself) was installed on, and make a new one in XP ?

If you had files on it you didn't want to lose you could have copied them to elsewhere before you did that.

You may not be able to delete the contents of a Recycler folder that was made in Windows 7 by emptying the Recycle Bin in XP.

You could try Taking Ownership of that folder, but that might not work for a folder made in Windows 7 in XP, and even if it does work, you may still not be able to delete the contents of a Recycler folder that was made in Windows 7 by emptying the Recycle Bin in XP.

How to take ownership of a file or folder in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/defaul...

NOTE: you probably have to reboot the computer before the settings you change actually take effect !


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#5
April 6, 2012 at 01:46:01
Hi Jefro,
All users get the same thing. It says "access denied".
I am thinking the files were "locked" (somehow) by Windows 7 which is no longer in the computer,

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#6
April 6, 2012 at 01:58:12
Hi tubesandwires,
Firstly, The recycler bin is not hidden, it is just grayed out.

You said, "You don't need to mess with it !"
Regardless of your feelings on this, it is an irritation that it is taking up a chunk of my hard drive and that the recycle bin never empties. When you try it comes back with "Cannot remove folder. Access is denied"

Then you said, "You delete the contents of all the Recycler folders on the computer (that were made by the same operating system installation) by emptying the Recycle Bin."
Precisely. and that is what does not work. When I click to empty the recycle bin those files just stay there and do not delete.

You asked, "Why didn't you delete the whole partition Windows 7 (Windows 7 itself) was installed on, and make a new one in XP ?"
Answer: because there were many files I wanted to keep. Deleting the partition would make everything go away and that is not good.

You noted, "You may not be able to delete the contents of a Recycler folder that was made in Windows 7 by emptying the Recycle Bin in XP."
Sounds Correct, but the Recycle Bin was created in Windows XP, (not 7). The files that are stuck in it are what were Windows 7 leftovers after the WIN7 uninstall. These were in 5 folders labeled with long strings of letters and numbers. They were still there after the XP install. I got them to delete to the recycle bin, but they are stuck there.

Lastly, you suggest, "How to take ownership of a file or folder in Windows XP (etc)"
That does not work. It gives the error code, "Access denied".


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#7
April 6, 2012 at 02:20:35
Another thing no one has mentioned yet; cacls is the command to take control of files or folders that windows won't normally let you access, (Like System Volume Information as an example) While it does allow me access to System Volume Information etc, it does NOT work on the offending leftover win7 files. I get "Access is denied".

If no one else has any method of accessing and deleting these files and folders from within Windows, I guess I am going to have to dig out my Ubuntu disk and come up in Linux.

No files or folders "locked" by windows are locked or secret in Linux. (I think that is why Gates hates Linux being free so much. All his security measures mean nothing in Linux.

I was just hoping to avoid going to Linux route. It would be so much simpler if there were a windows or command prompt command that would do the job.


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#8
April 6, 2012 at 12:55:31
"Firstly, The recycler bin is not hidden, it is just grayed out."

It being greyed out indicates that it IS normally hidden, AND you enabled showing hidden files and folders in Folder Options - View.

RIGHT click on the Recycler folder, select Properties, and look at the Attributes at the bottom of the Properties window. - there is a greyed out box with a check mark in it beside Hidden - you can't change that when that's greyed out, at least not in Windows itself.
You CAN remove the square "dot" from the Read only attribute box , however., by clicking on it.
....

"...it is an irritation that it is taking up a chunk of my hard drive ..."

What is the total size of the partition it's on ?

Hold your mouse cursor over the problem Recycler folder - what size does it display in a "baloon" ,

or - RIGHT click on it, choose Properties - what Size does it say there ?

"Size on disk" is the space the data in it occupies on the drive partition that cannot be used for other data, rounded to the next highest number of allocation units for each individual file - e.g. for a partition that is using NTFS software partitioning, that's the next highest multiple of 4 kb (4,096 bytes).
....

You get the "Cannot remove folder. Access is denied" message or similar when you try to delete the normally hidden Recycler folder in any Windows version, 2000 and up.
That's normal behavior, as intended.
....

"You asked, ""Why didn't you delete the whole partition Windows 7 (Windows 7 itself) was installed on, and make a new one in XP ?""
Answer: because there were many files I wanted to keep. Deleting the partition would make everything go away and that is not good."

As I said above..."If you had files on it you didn't want to lose you could have copied them to elsewhere before you did that. "

Even if you have no other hard drive partition that has enough space to copy the files you don't want to lose to,
- music, video, movie, picture, document etc.. files are easily burned to CDs or DVDs

- you DO NOT need to copy files for programs you've added that can be easily re-installed

- you can use free "partition manipulation" programs to reduce the size of an existing partition that has lots of free space on it to free up some un-allocated space on the same physical drive that you can make one or more new partition(s) on, copy the data you don't want to lose to that (those) new partitions, then delete the partition Windows 7 was installed on, and either
- add the un-allocated space freed up by doing that to another partition
- or make another new partition in the un-allocated space.

E.g. the freeware Easesus Partition Master Home Edition can do all of those things, without you losing the existing data on partitions that you reduce or expand in size.
.....

"You noted, ""You may not be able to delete the contents of a Recycler folder that was made in Windows 7 by emptying the Recycle Bin in XP.""
Sounds Correct, but the Recycle Bin was created in Windows XP, (not 7)."

Since you used the existing partition that was made by Windows 7, the Recycle Bin was created by XP, but the Recycler folder WAS NOT.

"Lastly, you suggest, "How to take ownership of a file or folder in Windows XP (etc)"
That does not work. It gives the error code, "Access denied"."

You have not explained what you did, if anything.

If you're getting the "Access Denied" message when you merely try to open the Recycler folder to see it's contents, if you didn't try the Take Ownership procedure for XP for accessing the contents of the Recycler folder, and do it correctly, the situation isn't going to change.

If you DID try the Take Ownership procedure for XP for accessing the contents of the Recycler folder, and did it correctly, and you STILL can't access the contents of the Recycler folder that was made in Windows 7, that doesn't surprise me.

( I can access the contents of the Recycler folder in XP, or in Vista, fine, when they're the only operating system that made the Recycler folder. )

You can't delete the Recycler folders in Windows in any case, at least not in Windows itself.
.....

"It would be so much simpler if there were a windows or command prompt command that would do the job."

There's no such thing as far as I know.




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#9
April 6, 2012 at 13:05:10
I didn't say access it. I said that each user may need to run disk clean up.

It is a folder for saving multiple users trash files.

A Pit Bull is like a gun you can pet. And there is no safety on it.


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#10
April 6, 2012 at 23:59:14
Hi Jefro,
I understand. Here is some additional info on that.
I did do exactly as you suggested. I tried disk cleanup for each user.
The users present in XP are not the same users that existed under windows 7; I had to create new profiles when I installed XP again. It could not read the Win7 user files.
Yes, Recycler is a folder for holding various users trash files (just like the $Recycle.bin that was left by Windows 7), but the files and folders that will not delete were Windows 7 "system" files that previously appeared in several folders named with names containing a long string of letters and numbers beginning with a dollar sign.
I tried deleting these folders and they did go away, but left their contents in the XP Recycle folder. Those contents are the files & folders I am trying to get rid of. They will neither delete nor restore.
I cannot delete the $Recycle.bin folder either, but that one does not bother me since it seems to be empty (and does not affect the XP Recycler folder).

Thanks to all for trying to help. Let's just write this one off as another of those MS irritations we have all gotten used to dealing with.


________________________________________________________________
Remember, "If you have a problem with a Microsoft program, it has to be user error." Aye, right.


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#11
April 7, 2012 at 07:46:29
You have not answered these questions...

""...it is an irritation that it is taking up a chunk of my hard drive ..."

What is the total size of the partition it's on ?

Hold your mouse cursor over the problem Recycler folder - what size does it display in a "baloon" ,

or - RIGHT click on it, choose Properties - what Size does it say there ?

"Size on disk" is the space the data in it occupies on the drive partition that cannot be used for other data, rounded to the next highest number of allocation units for each individual file - e.g. for a partition that is using NTFS software partitioning, that's the next highest multiple of 4 kb (4,096 bytes). "
....

"Size on disk" is always equal to, or more likely larger than, the "Size".

If you have a relatively huge amount of free space available on that partition, you can probably ignore the space taken up by the Recycler folder, IF and only IF emptying the Recycle Bin in XP DOES delete files and folders you have deleted for that same partition now and in the future.
.....................

You did an oddball thing by installing XP on a partition that had been made by Windows 7 that originally had Windows 7 itself installed on it, and not deleting all the data on that partition (not deleting the partition which would have deleted the Recycler folder) before you installed XP.

Your situation is NOT Microsoft's fault - it's YOUR fault.

You CAN fix your problem if you start over from scratch and delete the partition Windows 7 made, then install XP.
I described several ways you can copy the personal data you don't want to lose to elsewhere in response 8.


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#12
April 8, 2012 at 08:33:23
Oddball? You still seem to misunderstand the situation. I did NOT install XP on the same drive or partition upon which Win7 was installed. Also, when I mouse over the folder 'recycler' it does not give a size. Instead it says, "Contains the files and folders that you have deleted." and nothing else.
As to your suggestion that the files be moved to another drive, The 350+ gigabytes of files on that drive is more than the total free space on the other drives together, and as to your suggestion of burning to CD/DVD, that would take WAY more CDs or DVDs than I have (not to mention the time needed to burn that many discs).
Further I have no intention of starting over from scratch and reinstalling XP. That would be a ridiculous waste of time.
I agree that I can fix the problem, just not by your method. I shall switch to Linux at my next opportunity. (Even though it will only take a few minutes to clear the problem with Linux, I rarely reboot the computer as I am using it almost constantly when awake.)
I am sorry for your misunderstanding but I do thank you for your offers of help.

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#13
April 8, 2012 at 11:50:28
Apparently, in order for the Recycler and $Recycle.bin folders to show up in XP for each hard drive partition, you must have both of these non-default settings set in Control Panel - Folder Options - View
- you must enable showing hidden files and folders,
- and - you must remove the check mark from the box before Hide protected operating system files.
....

"...when I mouse over the folder 'recycler' it does not give a size. Instead it says, "Contains the files and folders that you have deleted." and nothing else."

In the XP installation I use the most, MCE 2005, which is essentially nearly the same as XP Pro SP2 32 bit, with additional multimedia support, with SP3 updates added to it, I see the Size displayed when I do this...

Hold your mouse cursor over the problem Recycler folder - what size does it display in a "baloon" ,

or - RIGHT click on it, choose Properties - what Size does it say there ?

The same applies to the $Recycle.bin folder

When the Recycle Bin is empty, on C the size shown for the Recycler folder is presently 970 bytes, the size shown for the $Recycle.bin folder is presently 258 bytes.
Apparently that size of those varies depending on which hard drive partition they're on, but it's always small when the Recycle Bin has been emptied.
....

On another computer I have that had XP Home SP2 installed on it, with SP3 updates added to it, I DO NOT see he Recycler or $Recycle.bin folder (Windows was installed on a FAT32 partition on that computer), but I DO see a Recycled folder - when I hold my cursor over that, I see "Contains the files and folders that you have deleted.",
but this DOES reveal it's size....

RIGHT click on it, choose Properties - what Size does it say there ?

In the case of that XP Home computer, on C when the Recycle Bin is empty the size is presently 85 bytes.

If the Size shown by doing that is small when the Recycle Bin is empty, the Recycler folder IS NOT using up a whole bunch of drive space as you claim.

If the Size shown by doing that IS using up a whole bunch of drive space as you claim, however you did it, it's YOU that created the problem.


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#14
April 10, 2012 at 00:56:01
Mine is a microsoft factory XP-sp3 disc.

Anyway, don't bother with this any more. Mark it "fixed"
.
All this chat was taking more time from my research than it was worth, so I shut down and booted in Linux, deleted the files and am now back to windows.

Thank you all for trying to help, but apparantly whatever microsoft glitch occurred it was not going to cooperate.

(And yes it was a microsoft glitch. It allowed the files to be deleted to the recycle bin, but then balked at deleting them totally. It either should have allowed totally deleting them or not have allowed them into the recycle bin in the first place, --not something any user has control over.)

Ok, Cheers, lads.


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#15
April 10, 2012 at 14:58:47
"....so I shut down and booted in Linux, deleted the files and am now back to windows."

We're glad to hear you found a solution.

Okay, so that confirms it's no problem deleting the files in the folder in Linux.

Did you delete the problem Recycler folder in Linux ?

(A new one will probably be created by XP automatically the next time Windows is loaded.)

If you didn't, you may STILL have the same problem in the future.


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#16
April 10, 2012 at 23:44:39
Yes, Linux deleted it immediately. Upon reboot in XP, the recycle folders were recreated (empty).

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#17
April 11, 2012 at 06:33:20
That's good to hear !

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