extra drive for storage is dead...not showing up anywhere

June 16, 2012 at 15:36:18
Specs: Windows XP
I had some clicking going on and a message saying something about windows couldn't write the files then all of a sudden the drive was not accessible any more...I have tons of pictures and god knows what else on that drive...I would like the stuff back but have not much funds to do so....have tried a few programs from the net but they don't find anything ....HELP

See More: extra drive for storage is dead...not showing up anywhere

Report •


#1
June 16, 2012 at 16:12:45
Clicking sounds are never good. They tend to indicate that a drive is dying or near-death:

http://harddriveclicking.net/

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


Report •

#2
June 16, 2012 at 17:10:22
If the drive has died and is no longer accessible then little, if anything, will touch it. Specialists can take the drive apart and restore what has not been damaged but that sort of thing is way too expensive for most ordinary users.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#3
June 16, 2012 at 17:37:14
Let the drive cool down for lets say 1 hour.
Think about what you have to do, to save your data from that drive, if it will hopefully work one last time.

Then switch on the computer.
You might not have that much time to save your data, if it's a thermal problem, so don't wast any time and save your data to e.g. a USB-Stick or another hard drive, if available.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
June 17, 2012 at 12:47:45
Try some partition recovery software. Note, I didn't say data recovery.

http://www.partitionwizard.com/prod...

You might get lucky

A thank you would be nice, if I have helped.


Report •

#5
June 17, 2012 at 14:12:37
Clive,

if there is a click sound, the hard drive tries to initialize, by reading track 0.
And if one of the ICs at the bottom of the drive get really hot, it didn't work.

When the hard drive has cooled down, it may work normally one last time, and one is able to backup the data.

After that, one can throw the drive out of the window.

Again, there is no partition problem, but a hardware problem.


Report •

#6
June 18, 2012 at 10:12:25
paulsep, you are probably right.
In the past when my pc has not seen a drive, I have been able to use the partition recovery to allow it to be seen.
Some people suggest sticking hard drives in a fridge to get it to work long enough to recover the data.
People just need to backup important stuff.

A thank you would be nice, if I have helped.


Report •

#7
June 18, 2012 at 14:30:32
the drive in question has already passed two times at least before it was completely gone....so there is probably no hope...my biggest problem now is that I don't know which drive inside my computer to remove....I don't know much about taking parts off the machine and I would not know if I am removing the right drive or not....don't want to disturb the main C: drive by accident

Report •

#8
June 18, 2012 at 15:00:31
Open the case and pull the data cable of only one drive and see, whether your computer will start your windows, when truning it on.
If it doensn't plug the data cable back on and try the same at the other drive.
If it starts windows, you know, which is which.

Report •

#9
June 18, 2012 at 15:04:03
I would not know what a data cable looks like either

Report •

#10
June 18, 2012 at 15:39:07
The data cable runs from the hard drive down to the mainboard.
The other cable (power cable) runs from the hard drive to the power supply.

Report •

#11
June 18, 2012 at 19:16:52
I will need to get the part that is required to attach it to a usb drive to see if I can read anything...and I don't know just what I need to do that either

Report •

#12
June 18, 2012 at 20:25:02
You need a USB hard disk case.
Best is, to ask a friend who can possibly help on that.

Report •

#13
June 19, 2012 at 05:05:58
a case?....don't I need the wired connection that will hook into the hard drive and have a usb on the other?....I do have an external 1 TB hard drive for storage of movies and such so that is where I would move the files if I can get my hands on them

Report •

#14
June 19, 2012 at 11:47:26
What happens, when the computer was off over night and you switch it on in the morning.
Will the hard drive in question be recognized?

Report •

#15
June 19, 2012 at 12:14:06
the computer has it listed as a DVD/Ram drive...so when you click on it you get asked to insert a disc

Report •

#16
June 19, 2012 at 15:28:21
Nope, not possible.
I guess, you only look at the drive letters and, when your hard drive has had e.g. drive letter D:, and it's not recognized by your system, your DVD/RAM drive might use drive letter D: instead.

Right click on "My Computer" and choose "Manage".
Then left click on "Storage / Disk Management" and check the drives found by your system and the assigned drive letters.


Report •

#17
June 19, 2012 at 17:50:42
there are only two listed...C drive and my H external hard drive

Report •

#18
June 19, 2012 at 17:58:40
Nothing else listed?
Not only one drive without assigned drive letter in the upper right list?

Report •

#19
June 19, 2012 at 20:08:55
no nothing else is there

Report •

#20
June 19, 2012 at 20:21:02
Now I'm a bit confused.
The drive H: is the drive you have problems with?
I thought, it was in internal second hard drive, you have problems with.

Report •

#21
June 20, 2012 at 04:04:22
all along I have been speaking about my D drive....it is a second hard drive in my computer strictly for storage...programs will not run from it

Report •

#22
June 20, 2012 at 07:29:04
D drive doesn't automatically mean, that it's an external hard drive.
Anyway, can you try to connect it to a friends computer, to see, whether it's generally working?

Report •

#23
June 20, 2012 at 08:39:05
it is not an external drive ...it is INSIDE my computer

Report •

#24
June 20, 2012 at 09:12:33
There is an inexpensive way of checking the dodgy drive, which I think paulsep had in mind at #12. That is to take out the internal drive and put it into an external enclosure (sometimes called a "caddy"). These are quite cheap and the unit then plugs into the computer via a USB socket, as an external drive. You have to select an enclosure that matches the drives' physical size and connections.

However, if the drive has failed then you won't see it that way either. Sounds to me as if we are "between a rock and a hard place".

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#25
June 20, 2012 at 09:32:25
Quite separately from my response above, can I make a suggestion for the future?

Get yourself a small USB external drive. I have one which is 100GB, which is about the size of a mobile phone and plugs into a USB socket. I've had mine for some time, so there are probably higher capacity ones available by now. It finds Windows drivers, so it needs no extra software. I'm in the UK but I would expect USB drives to be less than $15 these days.

If you have room on the C drive then you put your important stuff on there and copy it onto the USB drive as well. You then keep the USB drive updated. This means that if the C drive fails you can copy back data from it (on any computer). In the less likely event of the USB drive failing then you can fall back on the C drive data. The only time you would be in trouble is if both drives failed at the same time, but that is most unlikely.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#26
June 20, 2012 at 12:37:17
to Derek:...I already stated somewhere here that I have a 1 TB external hard drive already in place....hindsight would have had me put another copy of the D drive info in there but I never got around to it...so here I sit with lost data/files/photos

Report •

#27
June 20, 2012 at 13:35:39
OK, I overlooked the bit about your 1 TB drive - thread has grown a bit since
my #2 and I only skimmed through it to see if it had progressed.

When my own backup drive failed I was never able to get it to work again.
Not really anything more I can add.


Report •

#28
June 20, 2012 at 18:52:17
thanks anyway

Report •


Ask Question