Data Execution Prevention close window explor

October 18, 2011 at 22:10:46
Specs: Windows XP
Last night, I open my video with realplayer, but when I open there a message saying that explorer.exe had failed, so i close that message and suddenly my computer froze and I reboot it.

When my computer start up, there a message by Data Execution Prevention saying that "window had closed this program" which is window explroer.Link: http://img403.imageshack.us/img403/...

When I click on "What should I do" this message come up "http://img94.imageshack.us/img94/746/img7233c.jpg". When I close it, my computer immediately freeze up and won't let me do anything.

Please could anyone help me fix this? Any comment or suggestion would greatly appreciated.


See More: Data Execution Prevention close window explor

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#1
October 19, 2011 at 01:51:09
Can you get into safe mode?
if so run a scan disk and see if any errors get fixed.

try this then let us know what happens and see if we can help further.


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#2
October 19, 2011 at 15:25:29
No, for some reason my computer won't let me go into safe mode. Every time, i select safe mode, my computer just reboot.

I found that I able to open task manger but it keep disappear after about 3 seconds. Is there anyway to fix this?


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#3
October 19, 2011 at 22:08:29
"Last night, I open my video with realplayer, but when I open there a message saying that explorer.exe had failed, so i close that message and suddenly my computer froze and I reboot it. "

Was that the FIRST time you opened that video ?
If YES, where did you get it from ?
Illegally gotten downloads sometimes have malware embedded in them.

".....for some reason my computer won't let me go into safe mode. Every time, i select safe mode, my computer just reboot.

I found that I able to open task manger but it keep disappear after about 3 seconds. Is there anyway to fix this? "

Both of those things are NOT normal and could be caused by malware.
.........

Do you have an XP CD ?
You may need one to boot the computer from an XP CD in order to fix your problem.

E.g. ff some malware has changed (infected) explorer.exe, you may need to replace it by extracting it from the CD.
......

Your second image shows

RUNDLL (window title)

An exception occurred while trying to run "C:\Windows\system32\sysdm.cpl,Not ExecuteprocessException C:\Windows\Explorer.exe

C:\Windows\system32\sysdm.cpl is
System Properties (System Control Panel)

This is the ONLY "hit" I've found so far that mentions both
An exception occurred while trying to run "C:\Windows\system32\sysdm.cpl
and
Not ExecuteprocessException C:\Windows\Explorer.exe

http://www.sqaforums.com/showflat.p...

Did you install QuickTest Professional ?



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Related Solutions

#4
October 19, 2011 at 22:32:28
The video was not the first time that I open it. I was able to open the video in my laptop but when i decide to transfer it to my desktop, it freeze the computer.
....................

"Both of those things are NOT normal and could be caused by malware."
Is there a solution to fix it?
........................................

"Do you have an XP CD ?"
I do have XP CD. If booting from XP CD is the only way to fix this error, could please kindly advise me how to it?
..............................

"Did you install QuickTest Professional ?"
No, unless, it come with window update, i believe that i didn't install it.


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#5
October 20, 2011 at 12:51:07
"The video was not the first time that I open it. I was able to open the video in my laptop but when i decide to transfer it to my desktop, it freeze the computer."

Okay, in that case, if your problem has been caused by malware, then the malware was not embedded in the video and was already on the subject computer.
Did you by any chance run illegally gotten software on the subject problem computer ?

""Did you install QuickTest Professional ?""
"No, unless, it come with window update, i believe that i didn't install it."

QuickTest Professional is a program you have to obtain and install yourself.
It's only a remote possibility that you did install QuickTest Professional. It's a lot more likely your problem was caused by malware.
....

""Both of those things are NOT normal and could be caused by malware.""
"Is there a solution to fix it?"

If it's caused by malware changing (infecting) explorer.exe, yes - you can replace the changed (infected) explorer.exe with the proper file from the XP CD.

""Do you have an XP CD ?""
"I do have XP CD. If booting from XP CD is the only way to fix this error, could please kindly advise me how to it? "

Good, and the following tells you how.
.......

Related info...

A detailed description of the Data Execution Prevention (DEP) feature in Windows XP Service Pack 2, Windows XP Tablet PC Edition 2005, and Windows Server 2003
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/875352

If you have loaded Windows SP3 updates, it probably has DEP too.

Automatic Update periodically loads an update that provides the data that DEP uses to determine whether a known malicious program is trying to execute something.

In this case, I suspect explorer.exe has been changed (infected) by some malware, and that's why you're getting those messages.

explorer.exe = Windows Explorer is what loads the normal desktop screen graphical user interface (GUI).
..........

In order to use the XP CD to boot your computer FROM....

- your mboard's bios Setup must be set such that the bios Boot Order or similar has CD-rom or similar listed before - above - hard drive or similar. (It does not necessarily need to be listed first e.g. if you have a floppy drive, that should be listed first.)
OR - some computers display a line while booting "Press (a key) to select boot device." or similar - in that case you can press the specified key while that line is being displayed and choose a boot device - choose CD-rom or similar (an optical - CD or DVD - drive).

- the XP CD usually MUST be in a conventional optical (CD or DVD) drive - in most if not all cases, the contents of the CD cannot recognize a USB optical drive model, and if so, the initial files will not load from the CD.

- if your hard drive that Windows itself was installed on is a SATA drive, depending on settings in the bios Setup regarding the SATA controllers mode, the Recovery Console may NOT detect any Windows installation because the SATA drive is not being detected. The easiest way to fix that problem is to change the setting in the bios Setup regarding the SATA controllers mode. (see the info below).

Once the bios Boot Order or similar is set correctly so you can boot the computer FROM the XP CD....

With the XP CD in a drive, you boot the computer.

When you see a line "Press any key to boot from CD" or similar, press the stated key while that line is still on the screen (usually that's within 5 seconds).

(If you DO NOT see the line "Press any key to boot from CD" or similar, if you have more than one optical - CD or DVD - drive, some bioses will only detect a bootable CD or DVD when it's in the first optical drive that the bios detects. Insert the Windows CD in a different optical drive, and try booting the computer again, OR, go into the bios and find the list of optical drives - it's often near where the Boot Order or similar is - the optical drive model you want a bootable CD or DVD to be detected in must be listed first in the list of drives, Save bios settings.)

The XP CD will load it's initial files automatically for a while.

Then you will see a screen where you can choose to Repair Windows or continue on to Setup.
Press R (for Repair) to load the black screen Recovery Console interface.

The Recovery Console will search for existing Windows installations and then list them.

NOTE - if it does NOT find existing Windows installations, you probably have a SATA hard drive that Windows itself was installed on, and the files initially loaded from the XP CD have not detected the SATA hard drive.
The easiest way to fix that problem is to change the setting in the bios Setup regarding the SATA controllers mode.
See this -
Using the XP CD and SATA drive controllers, SATA drives; the SATA drive controller bios settings.
See response 2:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

Usually the Recovery Console finds only one Windows installation - 1. C:\Windows.
Press the key for the number of the Windows installation, then press Enter.
(If the drive letter at the beginning of that is not C, that sometimes happens when you install XP. In that case, in the following, substitute the drive letter you see for where the C drive letter is in the text.)

Usually that's
Press 1, then Enter.

You will then see a line .......Password:
Usually there is no password.
Just press Enter.

(If there IS a password required, there will be asterisk characters - "stars" - the uppercase of 8 on your keyboard - after ......Password:
The Password is the same one you use when you load Windows Safe mode and choose the Administrator user.)

You will then see the command prompt C:\Windows (or whatever drive letter:\Windows)
....

Optional - check the size of the existing explorer.exe.
Type: dir explorer.exe (Press Enter)
(a space between dir and explorer.exe)

If it's been infected by malware, it may or may not be a non-standard size
My explorer.exe is 1,010 kb,
or In it's Properties
0.98 MB (1,033,728 bytes).
I have installed Windows SP3 updates.
explorer.exe in C:\Windows is that size, and there is an identical copy of it in
C:\Windows\ServicePackFiles\i386

NOTE that you may also have that second copy.
If you want to find out if you do, and if so copy that second copy instead of extracting the original explorer.exe from the CD, see below.
.....

To extract explorer.exe from the original XP CD...

Type:
expand d:\i386\explorer.ex_ C:\Windows (Press Enter)

(a space between expand and d:\i386\explorer.ex_ , and between explorer.ex_ and C:\Windows)
(The underline character at the end of explorer.ex_ indicates the file on the CD is compressed. When you use the expand command the file is un-compressed and re-named to explorer.exe.)

You should get a message "overwrite existing file ?" or similar - answer yes - and a message saying the operation completed successfully.

NOTE that the d at the beginning of d:\i386\explorer.ex_ is generic and can represent any drive letter a CD or DVD drive is using.
The drive letter of the CD or DVD drive you have the XP CD in is NOT necessarily the same as it was in Windows.
To confirm the drive letter of the CD or DVD drive the XP CD is in...
Type the drive letter you think it should be, followed by the colon character, press Enter.
E.g. type: E: (press Enter)
If you get a message saying it's an invalid drive letter, try another drive letter and : Type: dir (press Enter)
If you have the correct drive letter for the drive the XP CD is in, you will see only a few files and folders listed, including the \i386 folder.
Use the correct drive letter at the beginning of d:\i386\explorer.ex_ in place of d.

To change the command prompt back to C:\Windows, type: C: (press Enter)
(or type whatever drive letter was before \Windows followed by a colon, press Enter.)
You should see C:\Windows (or whatever drive letter\Windows).
If you see something else, type cd.. (press Enter) as many times as it takes to get just C:\ (or whatever drive letter was before \Windows). then type cd \Windows (press Enter) (a space between cd and \Windows).


OR - If you want to find out if you DO already have the second copy of explorer.exe on your hard drive, and if so copy that second copy instead of extracting the original explorer.exe from the CD

Type:
cd \ServicePackFiles\i386 (press Enter)
(a space between cd and \....)

You should see C:\Windows\ServicePackFiles\i386 if the folder exists.

(if that doesn't work...
Type: cd.. (press Enter)
Type: cd \Windows\ServicePackFies\i386 (press Enter)
(a space between cd and \....) )


If the folder exists, type:
dir explorer.exe (Press Enter)
(a space between dir and explorer.exe)

explorer.exe should be listed
If it is, it MAY be a different size than the one in the C:\Windows folder. It's supposed to be the same size.

If it exists, type:
copy explorer.exe C:\Windows
(a space between copy and explorer.exe, and between explorer.exe and C:\Windows.

You should get a message "overwrite existing file ?" or similar - answer yes - and a message saying the operation completed successfully.
...

In either case...

Type: exit (press Enter) to close the Recovery Console and Restart the computer.
DO NOT press the key to boot from the XP CD.
Let Windows load normally.
Try your computer to see if the problem is still there or not.

If the problem is gone, run a FULL scan with whatever anti-malware program(s) you have installed.
....

I also recommend that you run the free version of Malwarebytes if that's not one of the anti-malware programs you have installed.

See response 1:
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...

Ignore the part about loading your latest System Restore restore point unless you did what the guy in that Topic said he did in the first post - loaded a previous restore point.
..........

More related info.

Description of the Windows XP Recovery Console for advanced users
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314058

See the info about the commands

CD and CHDIR
COPY
DIR
EXIT
EXPAND



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#6
October 20, 2011 at 17:36:19
Dear Tubesandwire,

Ask I get to Recovery Console, my computer didn't ask me pick number one nor the password.

On the command line, all it show is just "C:\" not "C:\Windows". Could you help me ?


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#7
October 20, 2011 at 18:37:11
I supply you with detailed instructions and you reply with two sentences.

You have not supplied enough feedback information in response to my info in response 5. I have no information about most of what you did or didn't do.

When you boot the computer FROM the XP CD, the Recovery Console does NOT load any Windows installation automatically.

If you actually DID boot the computer FROM the XP CD, I suspect you have a SATA hard drive that Windows itself was installed on, the bios settings have the SATA controllers in a mode other than an IDE compatible mode, and because of that the Recovery Console is not finding any Windows installtion.

As I said in response 5:

"The Recovery Console will search for existing Windows installations and then list them.

NOTE - if it does NOT find existing Windows installations, you probably have a SATA hard drive that Windows itself was installed on, and the files initially loaded from the XP CD have not detected the SATA hard drive.
The easiest way to fix that problem is to change the setting in the bios Setup regarding the SATA controllers mode.
See this -
Using the XP CD and SATA drive controllers, SATA drives; the SATA drive controller bios settings.
See response 2:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
"
....

Some computers have the option of loading the Recovery Console while booting by pressing a key, or by selecting that from a Windows loading choices screen - if your computer has that option, I recommend you DO NOT use it - the files for that are on the hard drive and may be corrupted and not work properly - the files for the Recovery Console when you boot the computer FROM the XP CD cannot be corrupted.
...........

If that doesn't help, your hard drive may be in the process of failing.

Test your hard drive with hard drive manufacturer's diagnostics.

E.g.
Seagate's SeaTools will test (almost) any brand of hard drive.
http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.j...

Do the long test.

The Dos bootable versions of SeaTools can test the hard drive when Windows will not load properly, or even when the drive has no data on it.

It the drive itself passes the test, any data problems on the drive can be fixed one way or another.


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#8
October 20, 2011 at 21:03:09
Sorry to provide you with so little information. Here is what happen when I boot from XP cd:

After my computer boot to the blue screen, I press R for computer recovery console. Then my computer load to black as screen as you describe but instead of "searching for existing Windows installations", it just show a line with "C:\". (Picture: http://img849.imageshack.us/img849/... ). After I check my system, I found that my hard drive is not SATA drive. I will run the "Hard drive Test" and let you know the result.

I remember that I use to be able select the existing Window installation but after I recover my pc from virus 6-moth ago, the safe mode wouldn't work and that probably why the windows installation didn't showed up in Recovery Console.

In the Recovery Console when I'm type "MAPS", there only 3 drive show up. ( http://img64.imageshack.us/img64/52... ). Then when I type "CHKDSK" command, it said that "THE VOLUME APPEARS TO CONTAIN ONE OR MORE UNRECOVERABLE PROBLEMS". Does this have anything to do with my window installation not showing up?

After I done some reasearch on google, I found a tool call "Ultimate Boot CD for Windows". It said that this tool would able to load widow xp. If Recovery Consoles couldn't restore the explorer.exe, can i use this tool instead to fix it?

Sorry to bother you with all kinds of question. I appreciate your comment and your effort in helping me.


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#9
October 20, 2011 at 21:52:17
"Then when I type "CHKDSK" command, it said that "THE VOLUME APPEARS TO CONTAIN ONE OR MORE UNRECOVERABLE PROBLEMS". Does this have anything to do with my window installation not showing up? "

You could try running CHKDSK /R C: (Press Enter) and then typing; exit (press Enter) to close the Recovery Console and restart the computer, then boot from the XP CD again and load the Recovery Console to see if it then lists 1. C:\Windows, but it probably won't help.

CHKDSK /R C: will display errors it finds and try to fix them as it runs - if it finds bad sectors that's bad - if it fails to fix anything other than that, that's bad.

I suspect that if you run a hard drive manufacturer's diagnostics long test you'll find that the hard drive itself is failing,
It's unpredictable what Windows will do when a large amount of data on the drive is damaged or missing from that situation.

"After I done some reasearch on google, I found a tool call "Ultimate Boot CD for Windows". It said that this tool would able to load widow xp. If Recovery Consoles couldn't restore the explorer.exe, can i use this tool instead to fix it?"

You could try typing: cd \Windows (press Enter) at the C:\ prompt in the Recovery Console, but that may not work.
If it does work. or if it doesn't you could try booting the computer FROM the Ultimate Boot CD, and you could try either of the methods above to get a new copy of explorer.exe into C:\Windows.

You are already able to load XP partially unless something has changed - it's just not working properly.
If the hard drive itself is failing, there's not much you can do.
If you have personal data on the hard drive you don't want to lose, you could try using the Ultimate Boot CD to boot the computer FROM - you may then be able to copy your personal files to elsewhere - but getting Windows to work properly again is probably impossible.
By default, ALL of your personal data is stored at C:\Documents and Settings\(your user name)\(your user name's files and sub-folders),unless you deliberately stored it in a non-default location elsewhere on the hard drive. .



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#10
October 22, 2011 at 17:33:37
Just like your prediction, the command "CHKDSK /R C:" didn't work. So, i decide to use Ultimate Boot CD for Windows. I was able to boot the window from the Ultimate Boot CD and manage to scan drive C:. After it finish it didn't found any virus and I check my Hard Drive with the program called "HD Tune" reveled that it in good health.

Then I check to see it my explorer.exe is infected but it show up as 1,010 kb just like the file size in Post #5. I decide to manually replace the explorer.exe by copy the explorer.exe from window disk on to my flash drive (since my desktop only have one cd room) and overwrite the existence one on c:\windows. After it done, i restart the computer hoping that it would fix the DEP error but it didn't do it.

So, I was wondering if do i need to change to registry to recognize the new explorer.exe?
Also, is it possible to disable data execution prevention in command prompt or manually? since I search around and found that you could do it in vista.


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#11
October 22, 2011 at 21:13:21
"After it finish it didn't found any virus .."

That sounds good but no one anti-malware program finds all malware these days. Most malware these days IS NOT a virus.

".....I check my Hard Drive with the program called "HD Tune" reveled that it in good" health."

That sounds good but I know nothing about that program.

There must be nothing wrong with the hard drive itself.

See response 7 starting at
"Test your hard drive with hard drive manufacturer's diagnostics."

"Then I check to see it my explorer.exe is infected but it show up as 1,010 kb just like the file size in Post #5. "

Malware may or may not change the size of a file it infects, and it would be better if you compared the size of yours to the number of bytes I reported mine has, which is more precise.
In Windows, you have to RIGHT click on the file and choose Properties to find the number of bytes (the size of the file, not the space it occupies on the hard drive which is usually more).

"I decide to manually replace the explorer.exe by copy the explorer.exe from window disk on to my flash drive (since my desktop only have one cd room) and overwrite the existence one on c:\windows. After it done, i restart the computer hoping that it would fix the DEP error but it didn't do it."

Good for you for trying that, BUT...
Therer is no explorer.exe on the XP CD !
explorer.ex_ in \i386 on the Windows XP CD is a compressed file !
If you just copied it to the flash drive and to to C:\Windows it DID NOT replace the existing explorer.exe and it's still explorer.ex_ and smaller than explorer.exe !

You can see if there is ANOTHER copy of explorer.exe
in \Windows\ServicePackFiles\i386 on your hard drive like there is on mine
- if it's there, copy it to the flash drive, and use that to replace the existing explorer.exe in \Windows

- or - copy explorer.exe from C:\Windows on another working computer that has had XP SP3 updates installed, to your flash drive, and use that.
(Windows SP3 updates may install a newer version of of it).

"So, I was wondering if do i need to change to registry to recognize the new explorer.exe?"

You can't edit the registry unless you can load the Windows installation the regisitry is on normally one way or another (normal or Safe mode or Safe mode with networking or Enable VGA mode) , and it's extremely unlikely that would be required in any case.

"Also, is it possible to disable data execution prevention in command prompt or manually? since I search around and found that you could do it in vista."

See the info about DEP after the first
Related info...
in response 5.

See near the end of the Microsoft article I pointed to, after the blue tinted table.

The boot.ini file is a file that's normally hidden in Windows. It's on the root folder or directory on your hard drive (C:\ with no subfolders after it when you're in Windows.

If you edit it so the line with the \noexecute switch in it is set to
\noexecute=AlwaysOff
that should disable DEP

Do NOT press Enter after entering =Alwaysoff
The line that \noexecute=AlwaysOff is in must left intact otherwise - in one long string - or it won't work and Windows may not load at all.

Save boot.ini, and then try booting the computer normally
.......

If that doesn't help at all, or if it does allow explorer.exe to load but you still have other major problems, since you have several ofther symptoms that are oddball, the following may be the only other thing you can try that MIGHT work without you having to install Windows from scratch and having to reload everything else.(which can take days to complete):.

See response 10:
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...

scroll down to, starting at:
"- If that doesn't help, you can try running a Repair installation of Windows "


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#12
October 23, 2011 at 18:57:18
Dear Tubesandwires,

As follow by your instruction, I mange to disable the DEP but the problem still continue. So, I decide to follow the step to do "Repair installation of Windows". I boot up into the setup menu, I press "enter" as describe in the instruction but I ran into some trouble.

First of all, when it at the screen of choosing drive, it show up an unknown disk. (Picture: http://img8.imageshack.us/img8/2095... )
Then when i press "enter" an error screen come up. (Picture: http://img196.imageshack.us/img196/... )

My question is after I backup all of my file from C: drive by using Ultimate boot CD, should I use the tool provide by Utimate Boot CD to format my C drive? Also, I wondering if BIOS has anything to do with this error?

Thank you.


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#13
October 23, 2011 at 21:27:33
Your problem computer is producing more errors or oddball situations than we normally see.

You HAVE NOT provided enough feedback.

Answer ALL questions and requests please !

"I mange to disable the DEP but the problem still continue."

Describe the problem(s) !

explorer.exe could still be corrupted or infected - if you did what I said I think you did in response 11, you didn't replace the existing one.

Did you check to see if you have a second copy of explorer.exe on your hard drive, , and if so, did you try copying it to \Windows ?
See response 11
.....

Your recent blue screen errors while trying to run the Repair installation of Windows may have been caused by ram errors.

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...


Then test your ram with a ram diagnostics program

Note that the Ultimate Boot CD may have such a program.

If your computer has 4gb or less ram installed...

If you want to try a memory diagnostic utility that takes a lot less time to run a full pass than memtest86 does, this one is pretty good - Microsoft's
Windows Memory Diagnostic:
http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag...
Windows Memory Diagnostic is limited to testing only the first 4 gigabytes (GB) of RAM.
It can be toggled (press T) to do a standard or a more comprehensive set of tests - use the default 6 test one first - if it passes one pass of that, use the latter one. A few of the tests in the latter set are intentionally slower.
If you don't have a floppy drive, see the Quick Start Information at that Microsoft link for how to make a bootable CD of the Windows Memory Diagnostic (you need Windiag.iso - you don't necessarily need to use the program they mention to add it to the CD).

Or use memtest 86, or memtest86+
..............

There MUST be nothing wrong with the hard drive itself

After you have tested the memory...

Test the hard drive with hard drive manufacturer's diagnostics, such as SeaTools.
DO THAT !
See response 11.
......................

Why are there TWO errors
Unknown Disk
<There is no disk in this drive.>

- do you have two physical hard drives ?
- do you have two hard drive partitions (drive letters) on the same hard drive ?

Are you SURE you have an IDE hard drive ? Do you know how to tell the difference between an IDE hard drive and a SATA hard drive ?

You CAN get the
Unknown Disk
<There is no disk in this drive.> error when you boot from the XP CD

- if you have a SATA hard drive, probably only if the SATA controller mode in the bios is set to SATA, AHCI, or RAID SATA - you shouldn't get that if it's set to IDE or similar (see response 5) .

- if you have an IDE hard drive and it's set to Slave on the back of the drive.
Is the hard drive's connection recognized as Slave in the bios ?

- if your bios Setup settings are incorrect - try loading Bios defaults in the bios, save settings

- if you're experiencing a ram errors problem. Test the ram.

- many other causes
....

The first blue screen...

.....caused by: setupdd.sys

STOP: 0X00000050

PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA

There is no setupdd.sys in Windows itself or on the XP CD,
but there is setupdd.sy_ (the compressed version of it) in \i386 on the XP CD

It's probably only used (uncompressed then copied to a temporary ram drive) when you use the XP CD.

You can get that error (a problem with setupdd.sys) ..

- if you're experiencing a ram errors problem. Test the ram.

- if you have a device or hardware that is damaged or is not working properly.
When you have a desktop computer, remove the AC power to the computer, make sure all cards installed in mboard slots are all the way down in their slots.
If that doesn't help, try removing all cards in slots that are not necessary for running Setup.

Some mboards develop this problem - electrolytic capacitors were installed on them that were not properly made, and they fail eventually - the mboard manufacturer didn't know they were improperly made at the time the mboard was made.

Open up your case and examine the mboard to see if you have bad capacitors, and/or other findable signs of mboard damage .

What to look for, mboard symptoms, example pictures:
http://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5
Home page that site
- what the problem is caused by
- he says there are STILL bad capacitors on more recent mboards.
http://www.badcaps.net/

Pictures of blown capacitors, other components, power supplies, fried Athlon cpus, etc.:
http://www.halfdone.com/Personal/Jo...

- many other causes.
.........

I found only relatively few "hits" on the web that had both a problem with setupdd.sys and Unknown drive, and all of them had no solution mentioned

If there is nothing wrong with the hard drive itself, if the ram is not producing errors, and if there's nothing wrong with your mboard or any devices plugged into it, if you install Windows XP from scratch it will probably be successful, but it's a lot of work after that to get everything else you need to do done.
- install drivers, update Windows (that alone can take more than a day - you can't install SP3 updates until a lot of other Windows updates have been installed), , install IE 8 , install other programs you need such as Flash, Adobe Acrobat Reader, any free programs you like to use such as iTunes, etc., etc, and copy your personal data you saved back to the drive.


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#14
October 28, 2011 at 23:21:34
Dear Tubesandwire,

I would like to apologized for my insufficiency respond and incorrectness.

First of all, I finally able to find that my hard drive is in fact SATA.

As for the problem, I replace the infected explorer.exe on the desktop with the new file from my laptop. As I disable the DEP, the DEP message gone but the computer still freeze at the start up. When I try to open task manger, it didn't show the explorer.exe running.

I tested the ram with memtest86+ and when it finished it said that test 5 failed. (Picture:http://img851.imageshack.us/img851/6194/ramtest.jpg ).

My question is can i do a Window repair install on SATA driver or not? How to set the SATA bios drive?
..........................................................................................

As for the blue screen:
"Do you have two physical hard drives ?"
-No, I do not.

"do you have two hard drive partitions (drive letters) on the same hard drive?"
-No, i only have one partition which is C drive.


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#15
October 29, 2011 at 07:53:13
"As for the problem, I replace the infected explorer.exe on the desktop with the new file from my laptop."

Good to be informed about.

"As I disable the DEP, the DEP message gone but the computer still freeze at the start up. When I try to open task manger, it didn't show the explorer.exe running."

Are you seeing any error message you have not seen before ?

You pressed Crtl-Alt-Del to pop up Task Manager ?
You must look at the Processes list in that to see which programs are running - that may not be the default page - you may need to click on the Processes tab.

If you're sure it isn't being loaded, since explorer.exe wouldn't be corrupted since you replaced it with a known good one , then there's something else wrong. That doesn't surprise me, considering your other oddball symptoms.

" I tested the ram with memtest86+ and when it finished it said that test 5 failed. (Picture:http://img851.imageshack.us/img851/6194/ramtest.jpg )."

When I look at that Image I see you have an AMD K8 cpu.

I neglected mentioning that memtest86 has bugs that cause FALSE errors to be reported for up to two tests in it's set of tests on SOME computers that have AMD cpus and/or AMD CPUs and AMD main chipsets .
For one of them, it reports infinite errors, which is impossible (the computer would not boot at all if that were correct) - that particular test never finishes reporting errors despite the fact previous tests found nothing wrong. If that's what you're seeing, you need to use a different ram diagnostocs program !

Memtest86+ was made by a different authour but it's based on memtest86 - it may have the same bugs.

(Also, memtest86+ has bugs that cause it to find FALSE errors on some computers unless Legacy USB or similar e.g. USB keyboard, is disabled in the bios Setup BEFORE you run the test That setting only affects whether you can get into the bios Setup with a USB keyboard by pressing the key to do that. . If you're using a USB keyboard that setting must be enabled in order .to get into the bios Setup with it - it usually is set that way by default.A PS/2 keyboard always works to get into the bios Setup when you press the key to do that..)

If you haven't already done so, see the info in response 13 about cleaning the contacts on your ram modules and re-installing it.

If you had not done that previously , try running memtest86+ again.

If you still get the errors....

If you have 4 gb or less ram installed, try running the Windows Memory Diagnostic instead - see response 13 - it has NEVER lalsely reported errors when I have used it, which is frequently.
If it reports memory errors too, you MUST fix your ram problem !

(Only XP Pro 64 bit, or Vista 64 bit or Windows 7 64 bit, can actually use more than 4 gb of ram. If you have more than 4gb installed, you can still use the Windows Memory Diagnostics - if you have more than one ram module, remove one (or more) so you have 4gb or less ram total, run the diagnostics, install the the one you removed, remove (a) different ram module(s) so you have 4 gb or less total, run the diagnostics again.)
....

"....I finally able to find that my hard drive is in fact SATA"

"....can i do a Window repair install on SATA driver or not? How to set the SATA bios drive? "

Okay, in that case, your problem with the XP CD finding Unknown drives, etc., MAY be because the bios Setup has the SATA controllers in SATA or AHCI mode.
If you change that setting to an IDE compatible mode of some sort, then the initial files loaded from the XP CD should find the partitions on the drive properly.
See the part in response 13 starting at:
"NOTE - if it does NOT find existing Windows installations, you probably have a SATA hard drive that Windows itself was installed on, and the files initially loaded from the XP CD have not detected the SATA hard drive."

(If the initial files loaded from the XP CD still DO NOT find the partitions on the drive properly, does your computer have a floppy drive installed on the front of it, or if it doesn't, does the mboard have the (34 pin) floppy drive data cable header on it ? )
....

""do you have two hard drive partitions (drive letters) on the same hard drive?""
"No, i only have one partition which is C drive"

If you have a brand name computer, the original brand name software installation usually has two partitions on the original hard drive. The second partition is always much smaller than the partition you see as C in Windows.
The brand name either....
- hides the second partition from you seeing it at all in My Computer or Windows Explorer

- or - it shows up as the D partition in My Computer or Windows Explorer, it may have a label Recovery Partition or similar, and either...
- you are not allowed to access it's contents
- or - you are allowed to access it's contents but you are strongly discouraged from doing so via messages.

In either case, the second partition usually DOES show up in Disk Management in Windows as being on the orginal hard drive, but it's contents may be identified as an Unknown partition type or similar. .

(If you don't have a brand name computer I have no idea why the XP CD wiould see two partitions on the single hard drive.)


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#16
October 30, 2011 at 15:09:10
"Are you seeing any error message you have not seen before ?"
-No, the DEP message gone, but the start up take forever to load. It just stuck at the screen and freeze the computer.

"You pressed Crtl-Alt-Del to pop up Task Manager ?"
-In the process tab, I was able to saw the explorer.exe is working but in about 3 sec, the task manger froze and the whole computer just froze.

"try running the Windows Memory Diagnostic instead"
-Is there a way to put this program on flash drive since I don't have a floppy drive on my laptop? If not, I could burn this program to cd and post you the result.

After I change to SATA from Raid control to IDE, the window set up still show up as two unknown partition.

"second partition usually DOES show up in Disk Management in Windows"
-How do I do that since my computer froze at start up? but I think it only one partition since D drive is my dvd drive.

Is it possible to get rid of the two unknown partition by using diver wipe from Ultimate boot CD to delete everything on drive C: ? When it format everything, can I install Windows again?



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#17
October 30, 2011 at 17:29:16
You need to test the ram again, then test the hard drive with hard drive manufacturer's diagnostics such as Seatools !
.............

""Are you seeing any error message you have not seen before ?""
"-No, the DEP message gone, but the start up take forever to load. It just stuck at the screen and freeze the computer."

Have you tried loading Windows Safe mode, or Enable VGA mode, since you disabled DEP ?

""You pressed Crtl-Alt-Del to pop up Task Manager ?""
"-In the process tab, I was able to saw the explorer.exe is working but in about 3 sec, the task manger froze and the whole computer just froze."

If explorer.exe loads but stops running there's not much you can do about that. It's supposed to be in that list all the time Windows is running.

The only time I have had that problem was when I loaded drivers for an ATI video card in the wrong order. In that case I could load Windows Enable VGA mode fine, I Un-installed all the ATI software in Add or Remove Programs, I was then able to boot normally, and I started over installing the ATI software in the right order.

""try running the Windows Memory Diagnostic instead""
"-Is there a way to put this program on flash drive since I don't have a floppy drive on my laptop? If not, I could burn this program to cd and post you the result."

See the Windows Memory Diagnostic info and link in response 13.
You can download either the version to make a bootable floppy disk, or the version to make a bootable CD by using a burning program on another computer that can do that with an *.iso file.

In order to use a USB drive to run ram diagnostics, it has to be made bootable by following a procedure, then in theory the floppy version's files should work with that, but the download makes a floppy disk with the data on it and I don't know how you could copy the files that would be on the floppy if you have no floppy drive or floppy disk, unless you made the floppy disk on another computer that does have a floppy drive, then copy the files on the floppy disk to the flash drive.

"After I change to SATA from Raid control to IDE, the window set up still show up as two unknown partition."

Are you SURE you Saved bios settings after you did that ? If you didn't, the setting was NOT retained.
If you're not sure, look in the bios - if it's still set to something else, change that to IDE, Save bios settings, try booting from the XP CD again (AFTER you have tested the ram and it passes).

You DO NOT set the SATA controllers to RAID mode unless you're using a RAID array ! That should have been set to SATA or AHCI or an IDE compatible mode when you have only one hard drive !

A RAID array usually if not always requires that you connect at least two hard drives to the same drive controller that supports RAID, preferably the same size of hard drives - you said you have only one.
A RAID array usually MUST be set up BEFORE you install the operating system on the computer !
Usually when you have two or more hard drives, or possibly just one hard drive, connected to a drive controller that supports RAID use, a line pops up while booting that asks If you want to use the RAID program, press xxx, or similar. If you don't respond, the computer's bios continues booting the computer. That's where you set up a RAID array. You probably should NEVER do that when you have only hard drive.
If your drive controller supports RAID use, setting up a RAID array and using RAID is always optional.
Only hard drives can be in a RAID array.

Not good. Either your hard drive has severe data damage in Windows, which wouldn't surprise me going by all your weird symptoms, or the hard drive is in the process of failing which would account for data damage, or you have a ram errors problem which would account for data damage, or one of the many other causes is causing the Unknown drive problem - the SATA controllers being in other than IDE mode in the bios when you boot from the XP CD is just one of the most common reasons for that.


""second partition usually DOES show up in Disk Management in Windows""
"-How do I do that since my computer froze at start up? but I think it only one partition since D drive is my dvd drive "

- If you could not see the second partition in My Computer or Windows Explorer because due to the brand name's wishes they hid the second partition, the D drive letter can be assigned to anything.
- if you could see the second partition due to the brand name's wishes, it may not have been assigned the D drive letter, but that's the usual case.

The second partition not showing up in My Computer or Windows Explorer doesn't necessarily indicate it isn't there.
Examine the drive using the programs on the Ultimate Boot CD !

If you can't get into Windows normally on your own computer, of course you can't get into Disk Management. If you have a brand name system computer that still has it's original software installation, you probably DO have two partitions on the one hard drive.
You can confirm whether it does when you boot the computer from the Ultimate boot CD, in theory, unless the second partition is an oddball type the CD can't see with any of it's programs.

"Is it possible to get rid of the two unknown partition by using diver wipe from Ultimate boot CD to delete everything on drive C: ? When it format everything, can I install Windows again?"

You need to delete the partition(s), then make new ones. The partition's partition table(s) may have been damaged - if so just formatting them won't result in the best result.

When you make a new partition with the Windows CD it uses BOTH a software partitioning type to organize the drive - usually NTFS -AND it formats that organized space. It doesn't just Format.

Whatever you use to make a new partition, that must be done, in one combo step (e,g, Win 2000 and up) , or in two steps (e.g. ME and previous Windows versions, and Dos - they use Fdisk then Format.)

If there is nothing wrong with anything else except the data presently on the drive, that will work,
but on the other hand when you boot from the XP CD you have the option of running a regular Setup or trying the Repair installation procedure.

Going by the info you have supplied so far, the data on the Windows installation may already be too badly damaged for the Repair installation procedure to work.

It is NOT RECOMMENDED that you delete the smaller second partition on a hard drive that had a brand name software installation on it !

If you can delete the Unknown partitions with the XP CD, then you can make at least one new one and install windows from scratch the regular way.
If you can't do that, there's something else wrong - that should work.

You could try wiping the drive with the ultimate CD, but that may not work either if you can't delete the Unknown partitions with the XP CD.
If that does work you can make one or more new partition with the XP CD.

If you want more than one partition , change the default partition size shown to a smaller number - 1,024 mb per gb, then prepare that other partition or partitions later in Disk Management when Setup has finished.


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#18
November 8, 2011 at 19:30:04
Dear Tubesandwire,

Sorry for the late reply. Ok here the situation now:

After I test the ram with Windows Memory Diagnostic and it said that it passed.

As for the hard drive I finally test it with sea tool and it said the hard drive passed as well.

"If you could not see the second partition"
-I found out that there a disk management on Ultimate Boot CD. When I open, it, the drive C: only have one partition. So, I decide to format my hard drive (C:) hoping that it will allow me to install a fresh copy of window. After it done formatting, the hard drive file system show as NTFS. Then, I setup a new window by booting the computer from XP CD but it still stuck at the screen showing the unknown drive. If I tried to move the error up and down, the screen turn to blue and freeze.

Could you help me fix the unknown drive that show up in set up screen?

Thank you for your kind advices.


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#19
November 9, 2011 at 00:48:20
You need to use some program on the Ultimate boot CD that will
- delete the mbr - master boot record - and make a new generic one, or one for use with Windows, or just leave it deleted. .
E.g. a hard drive preparation program

When you have done that try booting the computer from the XP CD again


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