Corrupt FAT?

Compaq / Presario sr1620nx
February 2, 2010 at 09:23:35
Specs: Windows XP
Windows Explorer shows Windows folder is 120GB. I added up all the folders in Excel and they are only about 5 GB. Have defraged, emptied Trash, and displayed hidden files. Only thing I can think of is FAT is reserving space for a non existent program. What to do?

See More: Corrupt FAT?

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#1
February 2, 2010 at 10:43:05
Maybe the Volume Shadow Copy uses a lot of drive space. Already checked that?
Empty the Recyble.bin.
Search the Temp folders and empty them.

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#2
February 2, 2010 at 11:20:59
Have emptied bin and Temp files.Also turned off system restore. Unfamiliar with volume shadow copy. Only reference to volume shadow copy I could find did not explain how to reduce it.

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#3
February 2, 2010 at 12:04:50

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Related Solutions

#4
February 2, 2010 at 12:21:51
When I click on the properties of C:, I do not see a tab for shadow copies. Also, the site does not show how to turn it off.

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#5
February 2, 2010 at 14:38:54
Use command line Go to the folder.
Type in

dir /s

What do you get?

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#6
February 3, 2010 at 05:57:55
For c:\windows many files flashed by. Results were 131,077,123,022 bytes with 5702 dir. So:
1. why does Windows Explorer show me so much less?
2. How may I determine what I don't need and delete

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#7
February 3, 2010 at 08:16:08
"Only thing I can think of is FAT is reserving space for a non existent program"

That never will ever happen. Programs reserve space. This is not a function of the file system.

Start by running chkdsk and posting the results.


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#8
February 3, 2010 at 13:35:20
Checkdisk went through 5 steps with no message other than it was verifying. then summary was displaid for less than 1 second, so I have nothing to post.

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#9
February 3, 2010 at 14:10:32
If dir command shows that much then you have hidden or system files and folders.

What you posted "Windows folder is 120GB."

To see all of them pipe the output of the dir command to text file.

dir /s | file.txt

Then view it in wordpad.

There is nothing wrong with the drive or format.

To see hidden and system folders use attrib command.

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#10
February 3, 2010 at 14:17:19
OK JohnHelp

The correct way to do chkdsk is not to put it in the RUN line which closes out once its done.

Put cmd in the run line and hit enter.
You are not in a black box
type chkdsk and hit enter
you will now have a display of the chkdsk results
right mouse click on the cmd window top bar and select EDIT then SELECT ALL
right mouse click again and EDIT and COPY

Now paste [right mouse click in the new post window] the results in a post here for review.


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#11
February 3, 2010 at 15:09:01
RE: DIR
Put Dir /a >dir.txt (have forgotten pipe key) and got that Windows is only 16,656,211 bytes

RE: Check Disk
I typed CMD in the run line and did go to the same black box. that's the way I did it before.
I sure appreciate the time and suggestions I am receiving


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#12
February 3, 2010 at 15:29:41
That never will ever happen. Programs reserve space. This is not a function of the file system.

That is exactly what the file system does. The FAT, or File Allocation Table does nothing else but allocates space for files. If the File Allocation Table becomes corrupted, which is a common occurrence with the FAT file system, space can be allocated but no with no owner, hence lost clusters.

That can happen when there is a glitch between updating the directory entry and updating the File Allocation Table. Two separate process that must be completed together. If something interrupts the process, like a power failure, the directory entry is updated but the file allocation table isn't and you get lost clusters.

Chkdsk should identify lost clusters and even worse, cross linked clusters, where the directory entry for two different files is pointing to the same cluster allocation in the File Allocation Table.

Stuart


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#13
February 3, 2010 at 15:31:55
"then summary was displaid for less than 1 second"

JohnHelp you only get those results if you do NOT go to a cmd prompt.

Going to a cmd prompt results in the following which is clear to see below. It never "disappears" even if you hit enter.

It should look like this: [though this is edited and from a vista laptop]

Windows has checked the file system and found no problems.

75987967 KB total disk space.
39263508 KB in 97136 files.
63412 KB in 19898 indexes.
0 KB in bad sectors.
231763 KB in use by the system.
65536 KB occupied by the log file.
36429284 KB available on disk.

4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
18996991 total allocation units on disk.
9107321 allocation units available on disk.

Please try again.

if you still can't do it then do a
chkdsk > checkdisk.txt and copy and paste the contents of the check disk file here.


StuartS
Please re-read my post and that of the OP's first post. The issue I was addressing was the file system NEVER reserves space for a program. How could it? It doesn't have the brains to read a programs requirement. Only programs can reserve space. For example you make a sql database of 10gig. It reserves 10gig of disk space but you may only have 4k of data in the database. This is an example of what a program can do. This is not something the file system can do.


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#14
February 3, 2010 at 18:06:19
The command was

dir /s not /a

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#15
February 3, 2010 at 19:02:23
RE: DIR
I ran /S also. I used /A (attributes) to show all hidden and system files

RE: CHKDSK
Ran it and got:
WARNING! F parameter not specified.
Running CHKDSK in read-only mode.
Correcting errors in the Volume Bitmap.
Windows found problems with the file system.
Run CHKDSK with the /F (fix) option to correct these.

149453639 KB total disk space.
146528276 KB in 94704 files.
32228 KB in 9275 indexes.
0 KB in bad sectors.
146531 KB in use by the system.
4096 KB occupied by the log file.
2746604 KB available on disk.

So, I ran CHKDSK /F (twice) and got:
Correcting errors in the master file table's (MFT) BITMAP attribute.
Correcting errors in the Volume Bitmap.
Windows found problems with the file system.
Run CHKDSK with the /F (fix) option to correct these.

149453639 KB total disk space.
146528364 KB in 94781 files.
32236 KB in 9276 indexes.
0 KB in bad sectors.
Thus, CHKDISK /F did not seem to work


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#16
February 4, 2010 at 13:17:50
How much does dir /s say?

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#17
February 4, 2010 at 14:00:26
When you run chkdsk you should get a message like this

C:\>chkdsk /f
The type of the file system is NTFS.
Cannot lock current drive.

Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is in use by another
process. Would you like to schedule this volume to be
checked the next time the system restarts? (Y/N)

You would answer yes to the question and restart the computer so chkdsk runs upon bootup. THEN it will correct the issues.

According to your chkdsk post your drive is
149gig and you have 2gig of free space.

This could change [slightly] once you have corrected the file system corruption.

When you have done disk cleanup have you checked everything except compress files?

Along the lines Jefro is pursuing how about a
dir /s of the program files folder

Since you mention your windows folder is 120gig [rather large] how about a
c:\windows> dir *.
which will list only the folders. How many folders total do you have?


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#18
February 4, 2010 at 17:12:51
Dir /s
Total Files Listed:
39308 File(s) 131,133,182,918 bytes
Dir *.
58 directories (folders)

Redoing chkdisk now


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#19
February 4, 2010 at 17:46:18
Ok same thing happend with chkdsk as before. Did reboot after request for /f. When did chkdisk after it ran (did not have to reboot to do this) I got the same basic results:
Correcting errors in the master file table's (MFT) BITMAP attribute.
Correcting errors in the Volume Bitmap.
Windows found problems with the file system.
Run CHKDSK with the /F (fix) option to correct these.

149453639 KB total disk space.
142657328 KB in 94846 files.
31908 KB in 9315 indexes.
0 KB in bad sectors.


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#20
February 5, 2010 at 09:18:19
Sounds like there is not enough room even for chkdsk to run.

I would suggest start by getting a usb stick/drive and copy off all info in my documents then delete the contents.
Go thru add/remove programs and remove unused programs then delete their folders from programs folder.

When you delete stuff do so while holding down the shift key so they do not go to recycle bin.

Point here is you need to delete stuff off so you can get to a managable place.


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#21
February 5, 2010 at 10:04:54
I did find a large file I deleted. I have 6.57GB free on my C:, and I would think that would be enough to run chkdisk. I have also run Adware looking for spyware (none). Windows is now up to 122 GB.

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#22
February 5, 2010 at 10:14:41
6gig free isn't even 5% of the drive. Defrag requires 15% free to run. You may have 6gig free but that could be little chunks throughout the drive which is worthless.

You do have your important data backed up right? If not that should be your first priority.

Suggestion: go into explorer, go to the windows folder, do a search on *.*, then sort by clicking on the size column so the largest files are listed on top.

What are the sizes of the first 5 and their locations?


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#23
February 5, 2010 at 12:55:49
Then you actually do have "39308 File(s) 131,133,182,918 bytes"

If you want to see them all then you were right before.

dir /s > myfiles.txt would make a file called myfiles.txt that you can view with wordpad or notepad.

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#24
February 10, 2010 at 15:06:33
Been busy with SNOW! top files are directories:
$shf_mig - 958 MB, 3292 Files, 648 Folders
$NtServicePackUninstall$ - 325 MB, 2784 Files, 1 Folder
PreFetch - 4.85 MB (didn't srite down details)
$NtUninstallKB955759$ - 2.17 MB, 6Files, 1 Folder
$NtUninstallKB972270$ - 805KB, 6Files, 1 Folder
Rest are much smaller

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#25
February 10, 2010 at 15:14:28
You didn't sort on size. If you did, directories wouldn't be first. Try again please.

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#26
February 10, 2010 at 19:11:35
I went to Windows Explorer and chose Arange icons by size. 9 files listed were between 1 and 2.5KB. Rest were tiny.

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#27
February 10, 2010 at 21:47:27
This may sound extreme, but you might be better off reformatting (to NTFS) if you have your Windows XP disk and reinstalling Windows XP fresh and clean. This assumes you have a complete XP install disk, You can back up all of your files to a separate medium, and have install disks for all of your programs. You will have a computer that runs like new (don't forget to do windows update multiple times to get all of your updates back).
OR purchase a larger hard drive, swap out drives, Install Windows and programs on the new larger drive, reinstall the old drive to transfer your files, then reformat the old drive to use as a back location for you personal files.

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#28
February 11, 2010 at 06:48:29
JohnHelp something is very wrong with your system.

You can't seem to run chkdsk properly. You can't sort on size in detail view [not icons]. You have files in your windows folder 10-50 megs in size [or potencially larger] and you can seem to see any of that.

Take your computer into a shop with all the disks and get some direct hands on help. Best of luck.


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#29
February 11, 2010 at 08:48:24
OK, well thanks to all for trying.

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