convert wired desktop to wireless

January 27, 2010 at 09:43:17
Specs: Windows XP
what things do I need to be able to have a wireless system. I have a wireless mouse, a powerline ethernet bridge, what else?

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#1
January 27, 2010 at 09:50:49
Desktop or laptop?

Do you have a wireless network card?


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#2
January 27, 2010 at 10:01:44
 I have a desktop and there is no space for a network card

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#3
January 27, 2010 at 10:13:44
You can get USB wireless too but I've found they are slow.

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#4
January 27, 2010 at 13:19:14
Just to have a wireless router and wireless wifi adapter to make a wireless connection.

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#5
January 28, 2010 at 15:49:39
I am still very confused., sorry if I sound stupid but when you reach my age you will understand. I am 73 yrs old and even thou I work on this computer and sometimes I work on computers there is a difference in fixing and understanding other things like this one. I was told that I needed a modem and a router., only two things and a usbconex. That was the answer and really I can buy both but what happen afterwards....

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#6
January 28, 2010 at 16:02:06
Virtually every computer made these days has a built in network chip (LAN).

The modem is the hardware required to connect to your Internet service provider. Many times their modem will also have multiple ports, which makes it a router too. If not then you need an after market router. You only need multiple ports if connecting multiple computers.

I don't understand why you would need wireless LAN on a desktop. The desktop isn't going anywhere so what difference does it make if it is connected with a cable?

Who is your Internet Service Provider (ISP)?


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#7
January 28, 2010 at 16:33:35
The Powerline Ethernet Bridge is a somewhat unusal device/approach (and a new one on me). It enables you to use the mains instead of a cable connection between a Router and Computers etc. This is different to Wifi - if that means anything to you.

This would be worth reading:-
http://www.thinkbroadband.com/hardw...

Look at the first diagram given. The dotted line is the "ring main link" between the upper and lower portions of the diagram. It uses your domestic mains as the transmit/receive medium between devices.

At first glance it seems you require an ADSL Ethernet Router and a Powerline Ethernet Bridge twin pack. However it would help if you can explain how many computers you have, (PC's and Laptops) and what you are trying to achieve. Also, what exactly are your present internet arrangements? It looks like a simple "plug-in" activity once we know a little more.

From Google it seems to mention 230V so I assume this is a UK device - I'm in the UK too (and also 74 next birthday LOL).

You can forget about the wireless mouse. This just works directly between your mouse and your computer and has nothing to do with the bridge or internet connection.

some other bloke...


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#8
January 29, 2010 at 07:24:38
If you have only one computer in the same room as your internet connection, then you should probably stay with hard wired (it's faster, more reliable, and easier to set up).
If you want to move it to another room and do not want to run additional wire through your house, then go wireless.
If you are hard wired now and want to add an additional computer (laptop, or desktop in another room) leave the original one hard wired, but add a wireless router to connect the other computer(s).
A wireless connection is simply a wireless router connected to you ISP's high speed modem or to your existing hard wired network (your 'network' can be simply your computer plugged into a hardwired router that is plugged into your ISP's modem), you can simply plug a wireless router into an existing router or a network hub. ((I have not used wireless much, but there might be wireless routers that also has hard wired connection(s) available on it) AND a wireless card in or attached to your computer or laptop.

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#9
January 29, 2010 at 08:28:26
To add to finger's response, most wireless routers also have wired ports. Be sure to buy one that does. That way you will use a combination of wired & wireless, if needed.

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#10
January 29, 2010 at 10:29:38
From junny's first post it seems like he/she has already purchased a Powerline Ethernet Bridge. In which case, this has to be a pair (one bridge to plug into the router port, the other one to be fitted at the additional computer - the mains forming the link). The main computer would be hard wired direct to a router port. It all depends upon an explanation of what he/she has in mind and what kit has already been purchased.

some other bloke...


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#11
January 29, 2010 at 10:57:09
junny
contact your local high school tech dept or the teacher of the technology courses and ask for a student to come help you. Students get credit for volunteer work. You won't have to pay for anything.

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#12
January 29, 2010 at 12:42:56
Good idea wanderer.

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#13
January 29, 2010 at 13:49:09
Thanks! It did seem like junny needed a more hands on approach.

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#14
January 29, 2010 at 15:34:08
farhaj, HUH?

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#15
September 8, 2010 at 08:08:27
**) Compare wired & wireless N\W ( in from of analysis )
Conclude that protocol in wired structured can be extended in wireless what changes are required ?


giv me full detail about this Q ........
thnks :)


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#16
September 13, 2010 at 21:40:09

I am only 32 and I have just as much trouble starting up on my new laptop. Its so confusing! I just want to connect Part A to Part B and it will work.
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