computer keeps Freezing. Can anyone help?

Custom / CUSTOM
January 21, 2011 at 11:34:25
Specs: Windows XP, 2.009 GHz / 2046 MB
Hello. About a week ago I restarted my computer, and after it booted up and i got to my desk stop I would let everything load. After that I clicked on my web browser and my computer would lock up. I figured i had a virus so I booted in safe mode and ran what I had avg, and spy-ware terminator. Avg didn't say I had any but spy-ware terminator said i had 1 Trojan so i deleted it. Restarted my computer and it still froze. Went into safe mode with networking downloaded avast and that said that I had some more so I deleted them. Restarted again. Still froze. Back to safe mode. Then I tried turning off some programs form starting up. That didn't work. Then I thought that there might me something wrong with registry so i got registry mechanic ran that and it said that I had 421 Things wrong. Fixed all of those. Still didn't work. Then I reformatted my hard drive and put xp back on, reinstalled all my drivers and everything was working fine until about a hour latter it did it again. I ran everything again (avast,avg,registry mechanic) they all said that it was fine. Then I ran a boot scan with avast. That said that it fixed 14 problems. But it still didn't work. So now I'm in safe mode with networking asking for help. If anyone has any thoughts on what the problem could be i would be much appreciated. Thanks.

See More: computer keeps Freezing. Can anyone help?

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#1
January 21, 2011 at 11:37:20
You computer is overheating. Probably a failing CPU fan or Dirt in the heatsink.

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#2
January 21, 2011 at 11:37:26
Try and run malwarebytes (Very good free virus scanning tool) run chkdsk /r in cmd and reboot. Lastly are you sure this isnt HDD related?

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#3
January 21, 2011 at 12:09:23
I checked my fan its working fine and i cleaned out the heat sink. Didn't work. I haven't ruled out my HD yet i'm really hoping that it not

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Related Solutions

#4
January 21, 2011 at 12:10:10
im runny the scan right now

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#5
January 21, 2011 at 14:01:29
I ran malwarebytes and it said that i had 6 infected files.I removed them but still having the problem

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#6
January 21, 2011 at 15:03:02
download, the lxde version of this and create a bootable cd:

http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=06411

boot with the cd, choose the run from ram option. when the destop comes up , open firefox , go to youtube and run videos for about an hour.
report back the results.

larry


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#7
January 21, 2011 at 15:53:32
"...avg, and spy-ware terminator...."
" ....avast, avg.."

When you have more than one anti-malware program installed that has one or more resident modules, you should DISABLE the resident module(s) in all but one of the anti-malware programs at a time, otherwise they are likely to clash with each other, and that can cause all sorts of problems.
AVG and Avast definitely have a resident module.
For more info,
see the first part of response 3:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

"got registry mechanic ran that and it said that I had 421 Things wrong. Fixed all of those. Still didn't work. "

Most registry repair programs only remove useless entries by default. Removing those entries usually has absolutely no noticeable effect.

"Then I reformatted my hard drive and put xp back on, reinstalled all my drivers and everything was working fine until about a hour latter it did it again."

That would have gotten rid of unknown to you crap that could have been causing you problems but only on the C partition - that's the most likely place for it to be, but if you have other partitions that you have your own data on that you didn't wipe out , there may still have been crap there.

" avast, avg.."
See the above info about resident modules.

If that doesn't help, if you do not have data of your own on partitions other than C, it's extremely unlikely your problem would be caused by malware with a fresh installation ( unless you've been going to places on the web where they are more likely to be picked up, such as within downloads of illegally obtained software) - in that case your freezing problem is probably hardware related.


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#8
January 21, 2011 at 16:18:32
Viruses getting through format is unlikely. Sometimes scans simply pick up cookies (which are really no real big issue).

As already given in #7, more than one AV running in the background could well be the reason for freeze ups.

Otherwise, hardware should not be precluded. Nothing lost by unplugging and re-inserting all major cables. I would be inclined to clean all edge connectors with a pencil eraser too (RAM, Video card etc) then pop the cards/RAM in and out a few times to ensure there is no oxide on the connectors. A bit of a long shot maybe but I've been caught out many times with problems that have turned out to be due to edge connectors and plugs.

A word of caution, there have been reports on here of systems being messed up by using Registry Mechanic. CCleaner's registry cleaner is a lot more docile (therefore safer) if you feel the need to use them.

We all live on a ball.


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#9
January 22, 2011 at 14:55:51
I am runny Linux right now and i played a movie on youtube and its working fine. Im i going to have to reformat my other partitions?

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#10
January 22, 2011 at 14:56:33
i got rid of everything but avg so nothing else is running but its still doing it

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#11
January 22, 2011 at 15:36:51
Is Linux running from the HD or are you using a Live CD?

We all live on a ball.


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#12
January 22, 2011 at 16:04:40
its running from a cd

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#13
January 22, 2011 at 16:27:38
Well, that makes it more likely to be system corruption than RAM, CPU, Motherboard, or PSU. I would normally suggest System Restore but with the past viral activity that is probably not on.

You are probably stuck with another reformat but this time lay off Registry Mechanic and ensure there is only one background AV.

We all live on a ball.


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#14
January 22, 2011 at 16:57:21
You should not be finding malware when the Windows installation is fairly fresh. That doesn't include Cookies - those are extremely unlikely to cause you a problem like you're having - don't bother looking for them - many anti-malware programs no longer look for them by default.

Do you have (a) partition(s) other than C that have your own data on it (them) ?

You do not have to un-install all your anti-malware programs that has (have) one or more resident modules except one - you just need to disable the resident module(s) in all but one.
The free version of Malwarebytes has no resident module.
The free and the paid versions of AVG (it's not set to look for cookies by default) and Avast and the paid version of Malwarebytes have a resident module.

By the way, Registry Mechanic may have one or more resident modules.

There is no one anti-malware program that gets rid of all malware these days. Malwarebytes finds some things other major anti-malware programs don't find (it's not set to look for cookies by default) .


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#15
January 22, 2011 at 17:23:13
how do i know i find out the hd is partitiond?

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#16
January 22, 2011 at 19:21:54
A physical drive's partition must be software partitioned, using a type of organization Windows recognizes - NTFS, FAT32, or FAT - then the software created organization must be Formatted so that data can be stored on it. In Windows 2000 and up, those two things are done at nearly the same time when you make a new partition on a physical drive, the software partitioning starting a little ahead of the formatting.
When you RIGHT click on a partition's drive letter in My Computer or Windows Explorer and choose Format, you are only Formatting it.

The physical hard drive always has at least one partition on it, if at least one drive letter shows up for it in My Computer and Windows Explorer.

Control Panel - Classic view - Administrative Tools - Computer Management - Disk Management.

The space on the physical hard drive(s) show(s) up there graphically - it(they) have an icon different from that for an optical (CD or DVD) drive .
The box to the right of the icon shows whether there are (software created) partitions on the physical drive.

If the hard drive has one or more partitions that Windows recognizes, the partition is labelled as xxxGB NTFS, (or FAT32, or FAT) Healthy , and usually there is a logical drive letter for that partition before xxxGB

If you have only one hard drive, only one partition that Windows recognizes on it, and Windows has been installed on it, then the label will say Healthy(System).

The partition that Windows was installed on that Windows was booted from is always labelled Healthy(System) - there can be only one of those on a computer at a time. It usually, but not always for XP or 2000, has the logical drive letter C .

You can have more than one (software created) partition on one physical hard drive - up to 4 Primary partitions (a dark blue bar above it ) , or up to three Primary partitions, and an Extended partition (a light blue bar above it ) , which can have one or more Logical partitions inside of it (within it).

If there is space on the physical drive that does not have a (software created) partition, that portion, or all, of the space on the physical drive, is labelled unallocated (a black bar above it ) , and has no drive letter .

A new hard drive, or a used hard drive that has no data at all on it, has no (software created) partitions.

If a partition is labelled Healthy (Unknown Partition) then Windows cannot show that partition in My Computer and Windows Explorer, and the computer user cannot place data on it in Windows.

Brand name computer original brand name software installations usually have two partitions on the original single physical hard drive - the second one is usually much smaller (sometimes the first one is much smaller), and it may show up here as Healthy (Unknown Partition), and if so it doesn't show up in My Computer or Windows Explorer. The remainder of the physical drive's space, the much larger partition, is where Windows and whatever other software the brand name provided was installed - that's seen as being assigned the C logical drive letter in My Computer and Windows Explorer.
......

If you have only one hard drive, only one software partition that Windows recognizes on it, then there are no other (software created) partitions that you could have installed your own data on.



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#17
June 8, 2011 at 19:40:37
ok so im having the same problem as this guy and ive tried everything i can think of and still havnt found a way to fix it. what should i do to fix this issue?

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#18
June 9, 2011 at 07:13:35
silversoul

Zillions of things can cause Windows to freeze.
There are things mentioned in the previous posts in this Topic that can cause freezes but they're not the only causes.

You should start your own Topic - click on Start a discussion - and provide all the details that you can think of
Include...
- the make and model of your brand name system, or your mboard if it's a generic desktop system
- what was going on or what you were doing when or just before the problem first occurred
- what you have tried so far
- if you are getting any blue screen message, or you briefly see a blue screen
..


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#19
June 9, 2011 at 18:19:29
i started one heres the link. http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...

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