Solved Can't delete folder on desktop

August 27, 2012 at 01:22:47
Specs: Windows XP
Can't delete folder on desktop. I created a folder on the desktop (windows XP Pro) but didn't use it. I can delete it but it comes back later. I used a program called "Unlock" - this also deleted it but it still keeps coming back. I can't find the folder in the registry.

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✔ Best Answer
September 5, 2012 at 08:37:56
Don't be scared off by all the text that follows. Taken step at a time it is quite easy. Computers take lots of words if you try to cover every eventuality. I'll use Puppy Linux 4.3.1 as an example (this is the highest number version that only makes saves to the CD - which I happen to prefer for this sort of thing).

You go here and select it from the list:
http://www.puppylinuxfaq.org/first-...

Download the file (pup-431.iso) but don't Run it, instead use SAVE and put the download into some spare folder or other. Perhaps make a folder called Puppy somewhere and send it there. It doesn't matter too much as long as you know where it is but I tend not to clutter the desktop with things like this.

So, you now have a download which requires burning onto a CD, but it is known as an image (iso) and you don't just copy it onto a CD, you create a CD from it. Almost all burning software has some sort of "create a CD from an image" faclity - although the exact wording will vary. In the unlikely event that you have no such facility there are small freebies that will do so.

Assuming you have produced the CD you then have to boot your sytem with it by poking it into the drive then turning the power on. Chances are that your hard drive will be ahead of the CD/DVD drive so it will see that first and continue to Windows. If that happens you have to do is go into BIOS and set the CD/DVD drive ahead of the hard disk.

If you are not sure how to get into BIOS then watch the screen when booting as it usually tells you. It usually refers to SETUP rather than BIOS. Commonly you either hit the F2 key or the Del key to get there. How you make the setting varies but if you make a mistake and set something in error then you can escape without making changes and have another go. Once you have done this you can keep it that way - any delay to booting will be too small to notice.

All you then do is boot with it in the drive and answer some easy questions. You can save these settings back to the CD for next time or if you want a universal CD then don't save them but put them in every time.

The Linux desktop will look a bit unfamiliar but at bottom left you should see your drives. One will be your HD which you can see even though it is not running. Everything is single click so you need to find your old Windows desktop. What "Windows" gives you is effectively a shortcut to Desktop so you will need to follow the real path, which is:
Documents and Settings / <username> / Desktop (which should show your obstinate Folder amongst other things. Right click to delete it.

Take out the CD, boot up and see if the folder arrives again, If so "something in Windows" is putting it there - though at this point I can't imagine what.

Far too many words - it's not difficult really.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks



#1
August 27, 2012 at 03:54:48
First try deleting it in Windows safe mode. If still it comes back, try a utility called "MoveOnBoot": http://www.softpedia.com/get/System...


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#2
August 27, 2012 at 16:56:46
Is it an empty folder?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#3
August 29, 2012 at 01:50:15
Derek Yes, it's empty.

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Related Solutions

#4
August 29, 2012 at 02:16:56
phil22 Safe mode didn't work and Zone Alarm scanned the Move On Boot file and said it was malicious!

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#5
August 29, 2012 at 05:35:43
Move on boot isn't malicious, although it might depend on where you got it from.

Check out the version here (unless that's the one you used):
http://www.softpedia.com/get/System...

If it comes to the crunch you could use a Linux Live CD which would allow you to access your hard disk without either Windows or Zone Alarm running. You create the CD from an image (most burning software has this feature). You then ensure that the CD/DVD drive is ahead of the system hard disk and boot to Linux with the CD in the drive. I use Puppy Linux 4.2 for this sort of thing.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#6
August 29, 2012 at 07:38:30
Derek - yes, that was the site I used.

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#7
August 29, 2012 at 08:46:50
I think it would be safe to turn off Zone Alarm and try again. It might be "the sort of thing it does" that is worrying it. There are other freebies around that remove obstinate files I believe, but MOB should do it. Don't use any other program unless it is revcommended.

Alternatively there is the Linux CD idea. They are useful to have around anyway because if Windows goes lop sided you can use Linux to get your important files copied onto a Flash Drive (drag and drop).

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#8
August 29, 2012 at 09:09:06
Derek

Downloaded MoveonBoot and ran it. The folder reappeared following reboot!


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#9
August 29, 2012 at 10:32:20
First, apologies for giving you the same link as in post #2 (I'd missed that).

I recall something about one version of Moveonboot only being able to remove files, not folders. This one has the same name but is from a completely different manufacturer (EMCO) and is much larger:

http://emcosoftware.com/move-on-boot

Give that a whirl.

Best uninstall the previous small one first, which was from GiPo.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#10
August 29, 2012 at 13:29:30
Derek

I installed it. It deleted the folder but it came back on reboot!


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#11
August 29, 2012 at 14:24:10
Very weird. Chain saw perhaps ?

When you delete it normally to the bin (and leave it there) does it still come back to the desktop after reboot?

What is the name of the folder? The reason I'm asking is that if it happened to have, somehow, collected a name forbidden by Windows (there are some obscure ones), that might have made it get stuck. A rename might help, or even putting it inside another folder.

I Wonder what would happen if you cut and paste it into My Documents. It would be interesting to know if it still comes back to the desktop after reboot. If it stays in My Documents will it then delete from there?.

I clearly have no technical explanation (hence the straw clutching). I still think Puppy Linux CD has the best chance. Outside Windows then if it is deleted there is nothing to tell it to put it back again. At the very least it would confirm whether or not Windows is saving info somewhere.


Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#12
August 31, 2012 at 04:39:41
I copied it into My Documents and another folder was created on the desktop with the name of contacts!

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#13
August 31, 2012 at 08:01:23
Hello everyone,
Just a shot in the dark here but is that folder in the public desktop? If so it will appear on anyone's desktop that logs in. Go to C:\Documents and settings\public\desktop.(I think that's the path) Note: the public desktop folder is hidden by default so you will have to enable viewing of hidden files/folders. If it's there delete it and see if that solves the issue.
~winipcfg

ASCII question, get an ANSI


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#14
August 31, 2012 at 14:52:41
Aha, that's a good point in #13.

If that doesn't unearth the issue, keep folders and files unhidden, then:

Along the same lines, go to "Documents and Settings". You will see various users listed (folder names). Most will have a sub-folder "Desktop".

I'm wondering if your empty folder is showing in more than one of those Desktop sub-folders. If so, try deleting all copies that you can find.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#15
September 3, 2012 at 12:50:23
Thanks for those suggestions.

No, the folder is only in my Desktop folder (ie my User folder).


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#16
September 3, 2012 at 16:00:37
I'm now down to darned near witchcraft.

I once had something stuck (although not quite your situation) and what follows was based on someone's advice. To my utter amazement it worked. In your case I guess it would go like this:

Delete the folder and empty the bin. Turn off the computer, unplug the mains lead (remove main battery too if it's a laptop). Now hold the power off/on button in for about 20 secs. I would be amazed if it worked but it's easy to try - you might need to keep a straight face while doing it.

Otherwise poking around with a Linux Live CD is about the only idea left in my bag.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#17
September 4, 2012 at 10:44:37
Thanks again, Derek, but I'm afraid it didn't work.

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#18
September 4, 2012 at 10:54:01
Did you try Derek's suggestion of booting from a live Linux disc and deleting the folder that way? There are many variants of bootable Linux distros but the one I use is Knoppix. It's easy to use. Give that a whirl.
~winipcfg

ASCII question, get an ANSI


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#19
September 4, 2012 at 15:33:53
Re #17
Doesn't come as much of a shock.

I'd just add that those Linux CD's take very little to prepare and are a great thing to have in your toolbag anyway. Just about any will do for this sort of thing and everyone has their favorites.

The reason I talk about Puppy 4.2 for this, is that it doesn't store any settings on your HD - any saves go back to the CD. If you don't bother to save the easy settings (such as what type of mouse you have and monitor size) then it will run perfectly well enough as a diagnostic aid or data retrieving tool on any computer running any operating system. Alternatively it can be tailored to a specific computer by saving all settings for a quick boot. You can even get online with it.

Once done, you remove the CD and Windows will have not been touched in any way. They work between RAM and the CD only.

I've heard other folk mention Knoppix. It's probably just as good or maybe better, simply that I've never used that particular one.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#20
September 5, 2012 at 00:35:19
Thanks for all your views.

I'm not that much of a techie - are there any detailed instructions anywhere to produce a Linux CD?


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#21
September 5, 2012 at 08:37:56
✔ Best Answer
Don't be scared off by all the text that follows. Taken step at a time it is quite easy. Computers take lots of words if you try to cover every eventuality. I'll use Puppy Linux 4.3.1 as an example (this is the highest number version that only makes saves to the CD - which I happen to prefer for this sort of thing).

You go here and select it from the list:
http://www.puppylinuxfaq.org/first-...

Download the file (pup-431.iso) but don't Run it, instead use SAVE and put the download into some spare folder or other. Perhaps make a folder called Puppy somewhere and send it there. It doesn't matter too much as long as you know where it is but I tend not to clutter the desktop with things like this.

So, you now have a download which requires burning onto a CD, but it is known as an image (iso) and you don't just copy it onto a CD, you create a CD from it. Almost all burning software has some sort of "create a CD from an image" faclity - although the exact wording will vary. In the unlikely event that you have no such facility there are small freebies that will do so.

Assuming you have produced the CD you then have to boot your sytem with it by poking it into the drive then turning the power on. Chances are that your hard drive will be ahead of the CD/DVD drive so it will see that first and continue to Windows. If that happens you have to do is go into BIOS and set the CD/DVD drive ahead of the hard disk.

If you are not sure how to get into BIOS then watch the screen when booting as it usually tells you. It usually refers to SETUP rather than BIOS. Commonly you either hit the F2 key or the Del key to get there. How you make the setting varies but if you make a mistake and set something in error then you can escape without making changes and have another go. Once you have done this you can keep it that way - any delay to booting will be too small to notice.

All you then do is boot with it in the drive and answer some easy questions. You can save these settings back to the CD for next time or if you want a universal CD then don't save them but put them in every time.

The Linux desktop will look a bit unfamiliar but at bottom left you should see your drives. One will be your HD which you can see even though it is not running. Everything is single click so you need to find your old Windows desktop. What "Windows" gives you is effectively a shortcut to Desktop so you will need to follow the real path, which is:
Documents and Settings / <username> / Desktop (which should show your obstinate Folder amongst other things. Right click to delete it.

Take out the CD, boot up and see if the folder arrives again, If so "something in Windows" is putting it there - though at this point I can't imagine what.

Far too many words - it's not difficult really.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#22
September 10, 2012 at 09:33:41
Derek

Guess what? Linux seems to have worked!

Thanks very much for sticking with me on this.

As I now have Puppy Linux on a DVD, what else can I use it for?


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#23
September 10, 2012 at 11:32:03
That's very good news.

Puppy can be very useful if Windows goes pear shaped and want to embark on some fix that might risk your treasured pictures, video's, documents etc. It means that you can first drag and drop you own personal files onto a flash drive.

You can also get onto the internet if you have no other computer around. Basic things like viewing pictures and so forth work fine without any hassle.

It can sometimes help your diagnosis when you have an issue that could be due to either hardware or software. If Puppy runs then you can have fair confidence in RAM, motherboard and PSU, as well as most plugs and sockets. If you can see the HD it at least tells you it is "working".

If for some reason you have need to live dangerously then you can monkey around with Windows system files, without Windows preventing you (take care with this idea tho LOL). If you're a bit geeky it can often tell you a lot about how Windows works. For instance I was able to prove conclusively that the iconcache.db file is created just before shutdown rather than on reboot which so many websites imply.

All MS Windows systems tell porkies to some extent, in order to keep things user friendly . For example, Desktop is not some magic place from which all other things sprout (as "Windows" Explorer might have you believe). With Linux you can see the "true" folder/file structure, which if it interests you can be very useful.

It can also be used on other computers once you have the CD/DVD drive ahead of the system drive.

I'm sure there are other things that will come to mind later but in summary (from my standpoint) it is a handy diagnostic tool.

I doubt you will become a Linux convert with Puppy because it is relatively primitive compared to some other Linux versions. It is not the most user friendly Linux version either. Later Puppy versions are better from a productivity standpoint because they can save changes onto your HD.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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