Solved cannot reinstall old bios

July 9, 2011 at 09:14:34
Specs: Windows XP
Hi,
I have a Legend Qdi BA1 board. I just upgraded the bios, but find that it has some anomolies, and would like to reinstall the old bios. However... when I try to reinstall the old bios I get the message "The program files bios-lock string does not match with your system" And in another place it says, "Checksum ABCDH"
Does anyone know what's happening here, and how I can reinstall the original bios?
Thanks,
....... john

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✔ Best Answer
July 11, 2011 at 09:00:36
Sometimes the required flash utility version changes for bios updates for the same mboard model.

If the previous bios version bin or whatever file you saved requires that you use a different flash utility version, that could be where your problem trying to restore the previous bios version lies.
......

There is a big difference between the bios not detecting (a) drive(s) , and detecting all drives but not detecting a bootable drive.

NOTE that, if you have more than one hard drive connected, if your problem was the bios was not booting an operating system from the correct drive with default bios settings, sometimes you need to CHANGE a setting in the bios.

When you have more than one hard drive connected, at least one has an operating system on it, and at least one does not, default bios settings may not be booting from a drive with an operating system on it.
If the first hard drive the bios detects by default, or is custom set to detect, is NOT found to be bootable, the bios will NOT try to boot from anything else in the Boot Order or similar list, and/or any other hard drive it detects.

In most modern bioses, when you have more than one hard drive, there is a list of hard drives in the bios, often near the Boot Order or similar setting. The drives are usually listed by their model. The drive you want to boot an operating system from must be listed first in that list - Save bios settings

Or - for the drive that has an operating system, you can change which data header it is connected to if it's SATA, or that or change the jumper setting if it's IDE, so that the bios does detect it first by default, according to where and the way it is connected. If you have both a SATA and an IDE hard drive, some bioses detect the IDE drive first by default, some detect the SATA drive first by default.
Obviously, if you have the list of hard drives in the bios, it's often much easier to change the drive order in that.

I'm assuming that if you have IDE drives that you HAVE NOT changed the jumper settings on the back of the drives. If you have, you WILL have problems detecting drives if you didn't set those the right way.
E.g.
- you don't mix Cable Select and Master / Slave settings for two drives on the same data cable

- some IDE hard drives - e.g. many Western Digital models - have two ways they can be set to Master - one for when the drive is by itself on a data cable, the other for when there is another drive set to Slave on the same data - that MUST be correct for the situation

Other than that....

Your problems regarding detecting drives are many times more likely to be caused by

- (a) data cable connection problem(s)

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittent, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.

80 wire data cables must have the proper end connector connected to the mboard IDE header - usually that's blue, but in any case it's the one farther from the middle connector on a 3 connector data cable.


Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.

- less likely - sometimes you need to change a default bios setting that specifies how long the bios takes to detect drives - and use a longer time



#1
July 9, 2011 at 09:31:28
We need more info. How did you update the BIOS? Do you use a bootable floppy & update thru DOS? Did you update thru Windows? Or was there an option in the BIOS? When you updated, there should have been an option to save the original BIOS so that you could roll it back. Did you do that? And what are these "anomolies" that you mentioned?

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#2
July 9, 2011 at 21:05:23
When you flash the bios with a different version, you should always load bios defaults after the flash has finished, because often flashing the bios does NOT clear the cmos contents of the previious bios version, and the changed bios version will often NOT work properly until the bios defautls for the changed bios version have been loaded.

Did you load bios defaults ?

Or - you can accomplish the same thing by removing the mboard \ cmos battery, reinstalling it, or by moving the clear cmos juimper on the mboard to the clear position, moving it back, but you wiil need to set the current date and time in the bios or in the operating system .
.....

If that doesn't help

" "The program files bios-lock string does not match with your system" And in another place it says, "Checksum ABCDH" "

The second message doesn't indicate an error. The checksum should match a stated checksum for the bios update.

You may have installed the WRONG bios version.

All modern bios versions have a portion of the bios code called the Boot Block that does not normally change, and it does not get replaced when you flash the bios the default way, for the same mboard model and revision or version of that model. If you flashed the entire bios including that Boot Block potion with the wriong bios update, the bios will probablty not worlk 100% correctly with your model, and you may not be able to go back to the previous version unless you flash the entire code including the Boot Block of the version you had before.

The old bios version may require a different flash utility from the one for the changed version.


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#3
July 10, 2011 at 20:31:38
Hi Mick,
I downloaded the bin file and used awdflash.exe from a bootable floppy. There was an option to save the bios, but when I tried to reflash it with the saved bios file, I got the mentioned messages, right after it seemed to be finished. I guess the main anomoly is that it seems to be very fussy how I configure the drives (master, slave, secondary master), i.e. how they're connected, and often doesn't recognize one or the other. But it's erratic. Sometimes it will boot, and sometimes it will not. It also doesn't seem to like my xxclone backups. None of these problems showed up until I flashed the bios.
Hi TaW,
No, I did not load the defaults, at or immediately after flashing. I have since resorted to the defaults, because I was having troubles booting (which worked) but the drive problems persist.
Yes..... I may have installed the wrong bios version. I was very careful to get the right one, but yes... you could be right.
Thank you for you're help. I'm going to see if I can find a copy of the original bios, not the one I saved, and see if that does the trick.
..... john

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Related Solutions

#4
July 11, 2011 at 09:00:36
✔ Best Answer
Sometimes the required flash utility version changes for bios updates for the same mboard model.

If the previous bios version bin or whatever file you saved requires that you use a different flash utility version, that could be where your problem trying to restore the previous bios version lies.
......

There is a big difference between the bios not detecting (a) drive(s) , and detecting all drives but not detecting a bootable drive.

NOTE that, if you have more than one hard drive connected, if your problem was the bios was not booting an operating system from the correct drive with default bios settings, sometimes you need to CHANGE a setting in the bios.

When you have more than one hard drive connected, at least one has an operating system on it, and at least one does not, default bios settings may not be booting from a drive with an operating system on it.
If the first hard drive the bios detects by default, or is custom set to detect, is NOT found to be bootable, the bios will NOT try to boot from anything else in the Boot Order or similar list, and/or any other hard drive it detects.

In most modern bioses, when you have more than one hard drive, there is a list of hard drives in the bios, often near the Boot Order or similar setting. The drives are usually listed by their model. The drive you want to boot an operating system from must be listed first in that list - Save bios settings

Or - for the drive that has an operating system, you can change which data header it is connected to if it's SATA, or that or change the jumper setting if it's IDE, so that the bios does detect it first by default, according to where and the way it is connected. If you have both a SATA and an IDE hard drive, some bioses detect the IDE drive first by default, some detect the SATA drive first by default.
Obviously, if you have the list of hard drives in the bios, it's often much easier to change the drive order in that.

I'm assuming that if you have IDE drives that you HAVE NOT changed the jumper settings on the back of the drives. If you have, you WILL have problems detecting drives if you didn't set those the right way.
E.g.
- you don't mix Cable Select and Master / Slave settings for two drives on the same data cable

- some IDE hard drives - e.g. many Western Digital models - have two ways they can be set to Master - one for when the drive is by itself on a data cable, the other for when there is another drive set to Slave on the same data - that MUST be correct for the situation

Other than that....

Your problems regarding detecting drives are many times more likely to be caused by

- (a) data cable connection problem(s)

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittent, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.

80 wire data cables must have the proper end connector connected to the mboard IDE header - usually that's blue, but in any case it's the one farther from the middle connector on a 3 connector data cable.


Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.

- less likely - sometimes you need to change a default bios setting that specifies how long the bios takes to detect drives - and use a longer time


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#5
July 12, 2011 at 09:02:16
Thanks TaW.
These are useful things to know. Thanks.
I'm beginning to think that my problems may stem from using the
newer version of XXClone, which is what I've just swithched to .... the assumption being that - newer is better ;< ( Now, I've just cloned my backup using the older version of XXClone, and am having no problems. (I've been using it for years and should never have switched.) This is complicated by the fact that one of my harddrives was on it's last legs, and that my mobo "does not like" anything other than the default settings. One problems is usually easy enough to track down, but multiple problems is another kettle of fish.
Thanks again for your help.
.... john

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#6
July 12, 2011 at 10:02:09
Software programs have nothing to do with how the bios version detects drives, unless cloning the data did not clone it properly such that an operating system partition is not found to be bootable when it should be.

"one of my harddrives was on it's last legs,"

You didn't mention that previously - that situation can cause problems detecting drives that don't happen otherwise.
E.g.
If it's an IDE drive on the same data cable as another IDE hard drive or IDE optical drive, one drive malfunctioning can cause both drives to not be detected correctly.

Check your hard drive with the manufacturer's diagnostics.
See the latter part of response 1 in this:
http://www.computing.net/windows95/...

If you don't have a floppy drive, you can get a CD image diagnostic utility from most hard drive manufacturer's web sites, but obviously you would need to make a burned CD, preferably a CD-R for best compatibility, on another computer if you need to.

E.g.
Seagate's Seatools will test (almost) any brand of hard drive.
Do the long test.
http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.j...

The bootable Dos versions of SeaTools can be used even if Windows is not working properly.

If the hard drive itself tests okay, any data problems found can be fixed, one way or another.
....

If the hard drive itself DOES NOT test okay, if you can, while you still can, copy the personal data that's on it that you don't want to lose to elsewhere, then STOP using the drive !

If the problem drive is the one that has the Windows installation you're booting from on it....
In most cases, all of, or most of, your personal data in 2000 or XP is at C:\Documents and Settings\(your user name)\(the sub-folders and files of your user name).

If SeaTools finds more than 99 LBA errors ( = bad sectors) in the long test, the test quits when it finds 100 of them, probably because Seagate knows it's extremely likely the drive is a hopeless case - it will probably continue to develop more errors

If SeaTools finds 99 or fewer LBA errors in the long test, you will have the option of zero filling the drive offered to you. If that's successful, the drive may work fine after that. Doing that deletes all data on the hard drive.
That's probably a waste of your time if there are more than, say, ten errors - the drive will probably continue to develop more errors.
E.g. I have successfully fixed two Seagate SATA drives that had only one LBA error by zero filling them.

If you get a message when you load SeaTools and the drive has been selected " The drive has been overtemp, Continue ?" or similar before you actually test the drive with SeaTools,
- that may not be correct if the drive is not a Seagate or Maxtor hard drive
- if it is a a Seagate or Maxtor hard drive, or in any case, if the drive's board has become defective, it often has one or more chips on it that get a lot hotter than they were designed to .
Choose Continue.

If the chips on it's board ARE getting too hot, that will be obvious - if you remove the AC power to the computer after the drive has been running at least a few minutes, there will be some places on it's board that get hot enough that you can't keep your finger tip on there for long without that causing you pain.


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#7
July 12, 2011 at 16:53:20
Hi TaW,
Thanks very much for your help.
.... john

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#8
July 12, 2011 at 19:04:06

Thanks for the Thanks.

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