Solved BSOD at XP SP3 update

November 13, 2011 at 22:22:29
Specs: Windows XP SP2, AMD K8 @ 1.7Ghz , 2GB
When I try to update my XPSP2 to SP3, the installation collects information from my system, then starts to make CABs. At that moment the system crashes with BSOD.

Similar crashes also occur if I try to install new drivers with drivermax.


See More: BSOD at XP SP3 update

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✔ Best Answer
November 19, 2011 at 09:43:23
You haven't said whether you can still get into Windows despite the BSOD error.
If you can......

You are given the choice of allowing the SP3 updates installation to save files so that you can un-install the SP3 updates if you have problems with them. If you allowed it to do that, you can un-install them.

Go to Control Panel ( - Classic View) - Add or Remove Programs,

If SP3 updates are listed, un-install them.
...........

If you can't get into Windows because of the BSOD error....

- is there a problem file named on that screen when you get that error ?
If yes, tell us what it is.

- go into the bios Setup and disable any shadowing or caching setting, Save bios settings

The key you press to get into the bios Setup depends on whether you have a generic desktop system and your mboard is a retail model, in which case the key you press is Del, or a mboard in a brand name system, which probably has the brand's bios version, not MSI's, in which case it would NOT be Del. If you don't know which key it is you press, if that key is not specified in a line on the screen you see while booting the computer, tell us which brand name system brand it is.

- If you have Windows installed on a SATA hard drive, go into the bios and set the SATA controller mode to an IDE compatible mode of some sort, instead of SATA or AHCI .
I can't tell you what you'll specifically need to change in the bios if your mboard has a brand name system bios version - whatever the setting is, it's changable, at least one choice is probably SATA or AHCI, at least one other choice is an IDE compatible mode.

If you have a MSI bios version, see the mboard manual on the MSI web site - it probably has info about the bios settings in that.
Manual
http://www.msi.com/product/mb/RS480...

- try loading Windows into Safe mode or Enable VGA mode.

Remove any bootable CDs or DVDs.
Press F8 repeatedly while booting, don't hold down the key, and when the (Windows) loading choices men appears, choose
Safe mode
or Safe mode with networking
or Enable VGA mode.

If Safe mode works, your problem is caused by something that is loaded when you start Windows normally that is not loaded in Safe mode.

If Enable VGA mode works, your problem is probably related to the specific video drivers loaded when you load Windows normally. You can always un-install the specific video drivers in Add or Remove Programs in Enable VGA mode - you may not be able to do that in Safe mode.


"My mobo is an MSI RS480-M2."

Your mboard can be either
- a retail model in a generic desktop system that has MSI's bios version,

- or a mboard in a brand name system that has that brand's bios version, not MSI's .

MSI RS480M2 (a.k.a. MS-7096 v.1.6) support
(motherboard version 1.6)

Set to Manual
http://www.msi.com/product/mb/RS480...

Set to Drivers
http://www.msi.com/product/mb/RS480...

If it is a mboard in a brand name system, you can use anything there EXCEPT the MSI bios updates !

"I am looking into the system drivers, now:
Is it normal, that I find 5 instances of "PCI standard host CPU bridge"? (My laptop only lists one)
A few other system devices also have multiple listings in device manager:
"Motherboard resources" 3 times,
"PCI standard PCI-to-PCI bridge" 2 times"

Those are all related to the main chipset drivers.

In this case, the mboard has the
• ATI Radeon® XPRESS 200 Chipset
which includes the southbridge chip:
• ATI ® SB400

Installing the AMD Chipset drivers listed on the MSI web site will install all that is necessary for the main chipset.

Installing the VGA drivers listed on the MSI web site will install all that is necessary for the onboard video.

Un-install any drivers listed for the main chipset or for the onboard video or ATI anything in Add or Remove Programs BEFORE you install those drivers !

Then look in Device Manager - if there are still some leftover entries there or multiple entries like you had, un-install them - they should not re-appear in Device Manager as devices that have no drivers or unknown devices after you have restarted the computer.

If you managed to un-install the SP3 updates
- un-install ALL anti-malware software and and third party software firewall programs. Then try installing the SP3 updates again, after doing all the other things already suggested that you should do before installing them.

If you can't un-install the SP3 updates,(or if you can and did but trying to install them again didn't solve your problems), if Windows still isn't working properly, you have puzzles you may never be able to find all the solutions to, at least not in a reasonable amount of time.

You are a lot better off, regarding time spent solving your problems,
- copying all your personal data that's on the same partition Windows is on you don't want to lose to elsewhere., -
- and installing Windows from scratch.

If you do that, for less total work you'll need to do after Setup has finished to update Windows, you might as well make yourself a "slipstreamed" CD, a CD-R works will all optical drives, that has had the SP3 updates integrated into the
contents of your original XP CD, and optionally the SATA controller drivers for your mboard integrated into it, and use that CD to install XP with SP3 updates, along with your original Product Key, rather than you using your original XP CD.
The freeware nLite program can integrate both things.



#1
November 14, 2011 at 06:14:47
Don't use Windows Update for SP3. Download the full SP3 update (approx 316MB) & save it in case you need it in the future. Use the file to run the install:

http://www.microsoft.com/download/e...

Get rid of "drivermax". It may take a little longer to hunt drivers down & install manually, but at least you'll know you're getting the right stuff, plus you won't have an intrusive "non-spyware" program on your system. Drivers are free & are found at the hardware manufacturers website.


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#2
November 14, 2011 at 06:27:38
I'll try...now downloading SP3, will take some time.
also will look for some drivers...
I'll be back, maybe in 3 days...

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#3
November 14, 2011 at 08:47:57
If your connection is that slow you can download that SP from anywhere and save to disk or flash drive.

I recommend you burn it to disk. You can also slipstream SP3 into your WinXP files and then burn a new CDR. Get nliteos to perform that operation. Get nliteos at the link below.

http://www.nliteos.com/


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Related Solutions

#4
November 18, 2011 at 05:59:28
Unfortunately, that update also did not work.
It crashed (with BSOD) at "...running processes before install...", after inspection of the system, and disc space checking.
I could provide a minidump, if someone is able to read and interpret it.

I suspect a system driver, but cannot tell which one.
According to MSI website I should have the right drivers, but drivermax tells me there are newer ones for IDE, SATA, PCI bridge, sound and usb.
Attempt to install these drivers leads to a similar BSOD.


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#5
November 18, 2011 at 08:04:44
riider already suggested you shouldn't be using drivermax. All those sites rely on files provided by members. The drivers may or may not be the correct versions for your hardware. Those sites should only be used as a last resort if drivers can't be located from the sources.

Download the distributable version of SP3. Disconnect the computer from the internet. Disable any AV programs. Remove all extraneous external hardware like printers, scanners, cameras, etc. Stop any programs running in the background. Then try installing SP3.

After successfully installing SP3 you can then add back the external hardware, one by one.

Post the full model and version of your motherboard.


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#6
November 18, 2011 at 08:33:27
"Disable any AV programs...."

Disable ALL anti-malware software from running their resident modules - anti-spyware , etc. programs too.
In some cases, you must un-install the program.

NOT disabling those or NOT un-installing the program is probably the number one reason SP3 updates fail to install properly !

Similar applies to third party software firewall programs.

NOTE that sometimes the resident module(s) of anti-malware programs - a part that runs all the time scanning for suspicious activity - will interfere with the proper installation of third party software, the software will not install properly, and you may get no indication of that at all while installing the software.
To avoid that possibilty, you should always DISABLE the resident module(s) of anti-malware programs, BEFORE you install third party software (software other than most Microsoft Updates, etc., that did not come with Windows ), especially when it's a major or complicated software package.
E.g. if you are using the free or paid version of AVG, you should disable the Resident Shield in AVG's 's settings in Windows (in AVG 2012 that's done under the title AntiVirus). In Norton (Symantec) products, there may be several things you need to disable, or set so they don't load for a specific short amount of time.
If you don't know how to do that, tell us which anti-malware software you are using.
When you are sure the software has installed correctly, re-enable the resident module(s).
.......

NOTE there are some anti-malware programs that MUST be un-installed - either because
- they still interfere with the SP3 updates installing properly even when you DO disable all resident modules in them from running ( e.g. at least some Norton / Symantec products )

- or - the resident module(s) CANNOT be disabled and stay disabled after the computer is Restarted while installing the SP3 updates - there is a choice of time limits you can specfify for how long it is diabled, but no way to disable it have it stay disabled until you enable it again yourself. When you restart the computer, the resident module(s) is(are) enabled.

If in doubt, un-install all anti-malware software, BEFORE you install the SP3 updates.

.


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#7
November 18, 2011 at 23:48:10
Thank you for all the advices. Unfortunately, it did not help, yet.

I have SP2 running without problems since several years. Since there are no updates anymore from MS, I tried to upgrade to SP3, using the distributable update version (as advised before).
This results in a BSOD at preparation for the update (running processes before update). BSOD: 0x1000008e, 0xc0000005.

A similar crash occurs when I try to install drivers downloaded from drivermax (at start of install), so I did not install any of the drivermax drivers.

The only other time I experienced BSODs was when I ran Avira scan some time ago; it crashed after several hours of scanning. I am now running Avast, without problems so far.

My mobo is an MSI RS480-M2.
Before attempting to install SP3, I stopped all programs, also background services like AV, servers, etc. - that should not be the reason for crashing.

I am looking into the system drivers, now:
Is it normal, that I find 5 instances of "PCI standard host CPU bridge"? (My laptop only lists one)
A few other system devices also have multiple listings in device manager:
"Motherboard resources" 3 times,
"PCI standard PCI-to-PCI bridge" 2 times
For other devices I have deleted (uninstalled) multiple listings some years ago, but never for system devices.


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#8
November 19, 2011 at 09:43:23
✔ Best Answer
You haven't said whether you can still get into Windows despite the BSOD error.
If you can......

You are given the choice of allowing the SP3 updates installation to save files so that you can un-install the SP3 updates if you have problems with them. If you allowed it to do that, you can un-install them.

Go to Control Panel ( - Classic View) - Add or Remove Programs,

If SP3 updates are listed, un-install them.
...........

If you can't get into Windows because of the BSOD error....

- is there a problem file named on that screen when you get that error ?
If yes, tell us what it is.

- go into the bios Setup and disable any shadowing or caching setting, Save bios settings

The key you press to get into the bios Setup depends on whether you have a generic desktop system and your mboard is a retail model, in which case the key you press is Del, or a mboard in a brand name system, which probably has the brand's bios version, not MSI's, in which case it would NOT be Del. If you don't know which key it is you press, if that key is not specified in a line on the screen you see while booting the computer, tell us which brand name system brand it is.

- If you have Windows installed on a SATA hard drive, go into the bios and set the SATA controller mode to an IDE compatible mode of some sort, instead of SATA or AHCI .
I can't tell you what you'll specifically need to change in the bios if your mboard has a brand name system bios version - whatever the setting is, it's changable, at least one choice is probably SATA or AHCI, at least one other choice is an IDE compatible mode.

If you have a MSI bios version, see the mboard manual on the MSI web site - it probably has info about the bios settings in that.
Manual
http://www.msi.com/product/mb/RS480...

- try loading Windows into Safe mode or Enable VGA mode.

Remove any bootable CDs or DVDs.
Press F8 repeatedly while booting, don't hold down the key, and when the (Windows) loading choices men appears, choose
Safe mode
or Safe mode with networking
or Enable VGA mode.

If Safe mode works, your problem is caused by something that is loaded when you start Windows normally that is not loaded in Safe mode.

If Enable VGA mode works, your problem is probably related to the specific video drivers loaded when you load Windows normally. You can always un-install the specific video drivers in Add or Remove Programs in Enable VGA mode - you may not be able to do that in Safe mode.


"My mobo is an MSI RS480-M2."

Your mboard can be either
- a retail model in a generic desktop system that has MSI's bios version,

- or a mboard in a brand name system that has that brand's bios version, not MSI's .

MSI RS480M2 (a.k.a. MS-7096 v.1.6) support
(motherboard version 1.6)

Set to Manual
http://www.msi.com/product/mb/RS480...

Set to Drivers
http://www.msi.com/product/mb/RS480...

If it is a mboard in a brand name system, you can use anything there EXCEPT the MSI bios updates !

"I am looking into the system drivers, now:
Is it normal, that I find 5 instances of "PCI standard host CPU bridge"? (My laptop only lists one)
A few other system devices also have multiple listings in device manager:
"Motherboard resources" 3 times,
"PCI standard PCI-to-PCI bridge" 2 times"

Those are all related to the main chipset drivers.

In this case, the mboard has the
• ATI Radeon® XPRESS 200 Chipset
which includes the southbridge chip:
• ATI ® SB400

Installing the AMD Chipset drivers listed on the MSI web site will install all that is necessary for the main chipset.

Installing the VGA drivers listed on the MSI web site will install all that is necessary for the onboard video.

Un-install any drivers listed for the main chipset or for the onboard video or ATI anything in Add or Remove Programs BEFORE you install those drivers !

Then look in Device Manager - if there are still some leftover entries there or multiple entries like you had, un-install them - they should not re-appear in Device Manager as devices that have no drivers or unknown devices after you have restarted the computer.

If you managed to un-install the SP3 updates
- un-install ALL anti-malware software and and third party software firewall programs. Then try installing the SP3 updates again, after doing all the other things already suggested that you should do before installing them.

If you can't un-install the SP3 updates,(or if you can and did but trying to install them again didn't solve your problems), if Windows still isn't working properly, you have puzzles you may never be able to find all the solutions to, at least not in a reasonable amount of time.

You are a lot better off, regarding time spent solving your problems,
- copying all your personal data that's on the same partition Windows is on you don't want to lose to elsewhere., -
- and installing Windows from scratch.

If you do that, for less total work you'll need to do after Setup has finished to update Windows, you might as well make yourself a "slipstreamed" CD, a CD-R works will all optical drives, that has had the SP3 updates integrated into the
contents of your original XP CD, and optionally the SATA controller drivers for your mboard integrated into it, and use that CD to install XP with SP3 updates, along with your original Product Key, rather than you using your original XP CD.
The freeware nLite program can integrate both things.


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#9
November 20, 2011 at 00:55:31
Wow, a lot of good ideas!
I tried the update in safe mode, using the redistributable SP3.
It took a couple of hours (especially the cleanup part), but it was successful. Subsequently updated via Windows Update. All went ok.

Now going to make an XP CD with SP3...

Thank you for all your good advices!


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#10
November 20, 2011 at 07:04:08
We're glad to hear you solved your problem.

Thanks for the thank you.


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#11
November 20, 2011 at 08:55:06
The fact that the update worked in Safe Mode indicates you had some stuff running in the background, or a least some of your hardware is not compatible with SP3.

If you can now boot into Windows and all hardware is working properly then you must have had some program/s running when updating.

Get nliteos as per #5 above to slipstream the service packs and if you are using SATA type drives, the SATA controller drivers.


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#12
November 20, 2011 at 09:39:15
It would be very helpful for others who read this Topic in the future if you could supply the details of what you did to solve your problem.

If you don't want to do a lot of typing you could copy existing text in this Topic, paste it into to your post, then add your comments.


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#13
November 20, 2011 at 19:09:17
Well, the fact that the crash occured at the preparation for SP3 installation, i.e. with full SP2 running, points to 2 possibilities:

1. Some background process/service interfered.
I stopped all I could. However, in normal operation, there are many services running without any handle to stop them. One of those may have caused the trouble.

2. Some exotic driver function, not used at normal system operation, are not properly implemented in my set of drivers, and cause problems.
Probably, such functions get executed in the step of backing up the SP2 system, causing BSOD.

Since in basic safe mode without internet only a basic set of drivers and processes get started, the update program also only uses basic functions. That made the process very slow, about an hour to check/backup, an hour to update the files, and more than 2 hours to clean up.

That the installation of Drivermax drivers caused a similar BSOD (same code 0x1000008e, 0xc0000005) points to a driver problem.

Whether the problem also exists in SP3, after update, I don't know.
A possible way to check would be to install a Drivermax driver, but, you all advised against that -- and, I don't want to compromise my running system by installing a questionable driver.


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#14
November 20, 2011 at 20:56:51
Thanks for the effort, but that wasn't all that helpful.


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