warning hard drive running out of space

May 6, 2011 at 11:09:07
Specs: Windows Vista, amd athlon 64/2620mb
Not so much a question more,hopefully,! advice.This problem happened to me a couple of days ago,with a suggestion that i use windows own disk clean up option.What was even more annoying was the fact that there was still 40% hard drive space left.I have not installed any new programs in the last year. I did run East-Tec Eraser,which does a number of actions including erasing "deleted" files beyond recovery,wipes free disk space,wipe slack of existing files and scramble deleted files.You can select the security level of deletion from faily basic 1 pass to to
3+7+3 which is beyond the American DoD level. Once I had done this my hard drive capacity shot up to 60% The moral here is that you cannot rely on Vista to give you the correct info.

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#1
May 8, 2011 at 11:56:59
Normally this is the case of the Master Boot record is messed up you can fix this with 2 steps normally. For one defrag your computer, second of all ..

Go to Run and type CMD

From the command prompt type in chkdsk /x the X definition will allow it to scan the entire file system front to back and ignore normal windows checks. If this does not fix it there is a secondary using chkdsk /r R is a repair function that also checks for bad sectors in your hard drive as hard drive do wear out if you defrag and perform low level erase functions multiple times a week.

There is also a nice program that is designed to wipe free space and rebuilt the MBR after it finishes to prevent issues similar as this known as CCleaner

http://www.piriform.com/download

Also they have a very nice defrag program that is also free that works much better than the default windows defrag.


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#2
May 9, 2011 at 07:56:54
Hello TItus ffx,many thanks for your reply,I shall take on board what you say.I have been using Iolo system mechanic pro. for several years now,and apart from running a disk defragmentation program it also runs a realignment programs and their dependent files on the hard drive.So the problem shouldn't be because of the drive being fragmented,in most cases the fragmentation level is around the 15%/20% mark
I think I would be happy to close this post,given that the error is more annoying than actually critical.Again many thanks for the ifo. that you supplied.

Eric Johnston


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#3
May 9, 2011 at 08:15:30
"as hard drive do wear out if you defrag and perform low level erase functions multiple times a week."

Sorry but the above is simply not true.

Low level erase as in writing 0's or 1's to the drive only happens with secure wipe software or partitioning software. This doesnt' happen with regular deletes.

Addtionally you can't "wear out" the platter surfaces reading and writing to them. This what they are designed to do. Kinda like saying you driving your car wears it out. Like with everything, lengh of time is the enemy and all things wear out eventually.

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#4
May 9, 2011 at 09:33:00
I'm not talking about wearing out the surface I'm talking about wearing out the hard drive it self. I've seen far too many wear out years before the time they normally should due obsessive cleaning over and over since low level formating over and over will cause a lot more stress than normal use, and the same goes for defragmenting a hard drive. Eventually after doing this over you will notice larger fragments that seem to not want to go away and even more frequent issues such as slow downs while using programs if it gets too extreme.

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#5
May 9, 2011 at 12:12:33
"low level formating over and over will cause a lot more stress than normal use"
&
"same goes for defragmenting a hard drive"
yet you write
"I'm not talking about wearing out the surface I'm talking about wearing out the hard drive it self"

Might want to spend some time learning how drives work. Defragging/low level formats decreasing the MTBF [mean time before failure] is nonsense. You don't "wear out" something by it doing what it was designed to so.
How do you think manufactures get the MTBF ratings? They put the drives thru heck.

Writing 0's and 1's to a drive [low level format] or defragging a drive [simply rewrites the file contigous instead of fragmented] are no different operations than what happens when you use the system which is full of file reads and writes.

This is just a repeat of an internet myth that was started a long time ago. There are folks, to this day, who believe defragmentation is not necessary for system maintenance. They are like the "birthers".

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#6
May 9, 2011 at 13:36:26
Actually defragmentation is nessasary for all but solid state drives, however Yes, In fact that it will wear out both the arm and the motor of the hard drive a lot faster than it normally should if you do it more than one a week.

The reason why is you are causing unneeded read and writes to an entire disk. The average life span of a hard drive is about 2-3 years if no defragmentation is done and about 6-9 years if defragmented at least once every 2 weeks. *once a week if you install programs regularly or uninstall large amounts*
However, if you defragment and low level format free space very often it will indeed shorten the lifespan of the arm and motor of the hard drive and your lucky to get 3 years without ended up having it skip sectors as it is trying to read and causing massive amounts of errors in the MBT.


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#7
May 9, 2011 at 13:52:08
White papers please.... I'd like to see the data on that study.

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#8
May 9, 2011 at 13:53:32
Does it really make sense to you that a motor turning the platters at x rpms is going to be effected whatsoever by what is written to the platters? It is going to spin those platters no matter what is happening on them.

Yet you say defrag is going to wear out the motor. If you understood the mechanics involved you would know this isnt' true.

If you wish to believe in fiction, it's your choice.

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#9
May 9, 2011 at 14:19:06
I guess you have only read the first sentence and based the rest on that... no matter what I say you will say your way is the only way that is correct even though there is no proof that you can say to change common sence to know the more often you use something the faster it will wear out, and the less often you use something the longer it will last. It's the same principles used for anything really.

You can test this theory with eveything, including the human body or even a car motor. The more often you race a car the more often you will have to change the oil due to oil breaks down much faster due to it was only designed for the average user not a race car driver.


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#10
May 9, 2011 at 19:52:03
Considering the hard drive is constantly spinning even while idle, how is defragging the drive making the motor work more?

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#11
May 9, 2011 at 20:59:28
Think of it as a human heart. It pumps blood all the time, but now think of you taking off running and then come to a stop; you will notice your heart is beating much faster than it once was. If you continue at the same speed of jumping between high speed and low speeds even when it's not even nessasary eventually it won't work nearly the same since everything has limitations.

In this sence take full level defragmention (complete cycle) it will require not only to continue with your background applications, but also sort throught the entire index to reorganize which it normally spins near it's max rotation which a desktop is around 7200rpm some much faster such as Raptors. Yes, running a defragmentation along with *free space wiping - which was the original topic* is fine but not as a standard every day task. After all you have to keep in mind the windows operating system already regularly defrags your computer in the background after your computer has been idle for over 5 - 10 minutes based on if a desktop or laptop and your power profile.


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#12
May 10, 2011 at 08:40:12
Hard drives do not change speed, they rotate at a constant speed.

Stop making stupid analogies that don't apply. Stick to the facts.

And as modify.hardware said, show us the white papers on these claims of yours. You are just speculating, and not coming close to actual fact.


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