Solved System Dead - BIOS Wiped?

May 19, 2011 at 16:51:25
Specs: Windows Vista
I am running Windows Vista Home Premium (64-bit) along with Ubuntu on my Toshiba laptop, model, Satellite E105-S1402. The system is about 2.5 years old and the hard drive is about 4 months old. Vista is in the first primary partition and Ubuntu is in the second.

I had just rebooted into Vista after installing a couple of drivers because I had no internet connectivity (in Vista). I then restarted the machine and things seemed to be fine. The system was probably running a good five minutes.

Drivers installed: Wireless LAN_Intel_13.0.0.107_W7x64W7x86_A
motherboard_driver_lan_realtek_8111_vista

I was entering some text (actually updating my vista product key!) and the system suddenly powered down, not completely but to what looked like a sleep state because the screen was blank. When I try to reboot by pressing the power key, the system powers on and then nothing, no hard drive activity, no BIOS info to the screen, just power and a blank screen. If I attempt to boot from CD, the drive will spin and then just spin down again, still showing nothing on the screen.

I was thinking the drive just went bad, but then why won't the machine POST? Did the BIOS info somehow get erased? If so, how to replace it since the machine doesn't see the optical drive?

Any advice would be appreciated.


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#1
May 19, 2011 at 17:14:38
✔ Best Answer
Most unlikely to have erased BIOS. Could be any number of things, but sure to be hardware if you don't see BIOS Screen, eg:

A connection has come adrift inside.
Power Supply faulty.
Hard Disk failure.
RAM failure.
CPU Failure.
Motherboard failure.

Hard to diagnose from afar but see if anyone else has suggestions for a way forward or a way of narrowing things down.

Please come back and let us know the outcome.


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#2
May 19, 2011 at 17:16:43
Likely something related to the power-supply or cabling has malfunctioned. On a laptop, that may be expensive to correct (or not---depending on the problem). Unless something seriously damages the actual chips on the motherboard (or an incorrect BIOS-flash is performed), it's unlikely that the BIOS is "wiped".

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#3
May 19, 2011 at 17:32:04
The chance of erasing the bios is about zero.

You have to get system to pass post. That means some basic part is failing.

Diag hardware, ac adapter, ram, psu, cpu to start.
I doubt you can mess with much more than ram or psu/battery.

1/3 of highway deaths are caused by drunks. The rest are by people who can't drive any better than a drunk.


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#4
May 19, 2011 at 17:44:36
Thanks for the replies. I've been wondering about all these hardware issues as well.

I wonder about the power supply - I had the dc-jack replaced so the laptop was pulled apart recently. Right now, the lights on the front indicate that it's plugged in, but not charging. I don't know what to make of that. Also, when the repair was done, maybe the memory wasn't seated properly?

My question is why would the system have been running fine for a week and then poof...nothing?


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#5
May 19, 2011 at 17:47:14
"My question is why would the system have been running fine for a week and then poof...nothing?"

Could be that whoever performed the repair didn't seat something properly (RAM, Cable, screws, etc.) and eventually "wiggled-loose" after some usage.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#6
May 19, 2011 at 17:54:38
True that anything could have become dislodged in repair so it is well on the cards.

However, it is equally true to say that about any electrical (or mechanical) device in this world was always working until it suddenly stopped....

Please come back and let us know the outcome.


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#7
May 19, 2011 at 17:58:15
Final question: I've got 4GB of RAM (2 x 2GB). If it was a memory problem, would both modules have to be unseated or just one of them? May be a dumb question, but it's been a long time since I've installed RAM and as best I can recall it had to be done in pairs, so I'm wondering if the system would still run with one module in place?

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#8
May 19, 2011 at 18:07:16
Pairing or not pairing depends on your computer. You should be able to find info on Toshiba Satellite E105-S1402 if you google around but most modern machines can run on just one. Sorry but I don't know your particular computer.

However, one good stick and one bad stick could still produce problems. If the spec says it can run on one RAM stick you could then try one at a time, cleaning their edge connectors with a pencil eraser while you are at it. I don't know how easy it is to access RAM on that model.

Instinctively I rather favor a bad connection or PSU failure - but who knows!

Please come back and let us know the outcome.


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#9
May 19, 2011 at 18:17:25
Yeah, thanks...either way the whole thing needs to come apart.

Thanks a lot for the help.


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