Solved error message low recovery disk space

December 13, 2013 at 13:58:41
Specs: Windows Vista, 1gb
I get an error message stating that I have no disk space left on my recovery disk, the D drive,
In "My Computer" Recovery(D:) shows a RED bar stating 5.63MB free of 9.99GB,
how can I free up disk space in the recovery drive? and why is it getting full in the first place?
Thanks in advance.

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✔ Best Answer
December 13, 2013 at 21:26:28
When you open the drive you can click on the 'view' option in the toolbar and go down to 'details'. You can also right click on an open space on the open page and choose VIEW--DETAILS.

I imagine the legitimate files will all have the same date. You may be able to google the folder names and see if the hits correspond to their being for recovery.

Oh, also check to see where your virtual memory swap file and temporary internet files (TIF) are stored. To change the location of the TIF files go to INTERNET OPTIONS--GENERAL--BROWSING HISTORY--SETTINGS.

On my XP machine, to change the swap file location you'd go to SYSTEM PROPERTIES--ADVANCED--PERFORMANCE SETTINGS--ADVANCED--VIRTUAL MEMMORY CHANGE. It's probably the same for vista.

If either of those are being stored on your D: drive then that's probably the reason you're getting the message.

Both the swap file and TIF are hidden and won't show unless you enable the viewing of hidden files and folders.

message edited by DAVEINCAPS



#1
December 13, 2013 at 15:47:46
Make/model of PC and Windows version may be helpful - or maybe not at this stage.

Take a peek in the recovery partition. Let's know what you see.
Usually it's reserved solely for use by the system should you wish to restore the PC to factory settings or whatever.
Any of your own files in there? There shouldn't be.

Maybe at some point some of your own files began to be stored in the D partition, thus filling up the drive.
Check the destination path when installing programmes or saving files. These would normally go to your C drive.

It's also possible that (depending upon which version of Windows) Windows backup was initiated and it's using the restore partition. Backups should be stored on an external drive.

If there are some of your own files in there, you should maybe move them back to their relevant locations on the C drive.


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#2
December 13, 2013 at 15:57:43
Peet100 nailed it. The D-partition is solely for doing a factory restore of the OS, you should NOT be using it for storage.

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#3
December 13, 2013 at 17:43:20
The computer is a Dell about 5 years old with Vista OS.
Something is filling up the D drive but not intentionally and I don't know why. Any tips on how to correct that problem?
There are six folders in the Recovery drive, how can I determine what I can delete and what is critical for the computer to run and for the "recovery" drive to fulfill it's original function to restore the os if there's a problem?
Thanks again

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Related Solutions

#4
December 13, 2013 at 20:00:42
Nothing in the D-drive is critical for the computer to run, the recovery partition is used to reinstall Windows.

"Something is filling up the D drive but not intentionally and I don't know why"

Could it be that you installed or downloaded something recently & just quickly clicked next-next-next without reading what was on the screen? Try viewing the files with details enabled, then sort by date, that will tell you which files have been saved most recently. Make sure you have 'show hidden files & folders' enabled & 'hide file extensions' disabled.


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#5
December 13, 2013 at 20:30:28
Thanks again for the reply.
I guess I should have said that I don't want to delete anything in D that would prevent the reinstallation of Windows-if in fact I ever have too. I assume that deleting everything in the D drive would cause the "Recovery" drive to fail to be able to perform is "reinstallation" function.

It is very possible that I, next next nextedwithout reading the screen

How would I go bout "viewing files with details enabled......."

Thanks


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#6
December 13, 2013 at 21:26:28
✔ Best Answer
When you open the drive you can click on the 'view' option in the toolbar and go down to 'details'. You can also right click on an open space on the open page and choose VIEW--DETAILS.

I imagine the legitimate files will all have the same date. You may be able to google the folder names and see if the hits correspond to their being for recovery.

Oh, also check to see where your virtual memory swap file and temporary internet files (TIF) are stored. To change the location of the TIF files go to INTERNET OPTIONS--GENERAL--BROWSING HISTORY--SETTINGS.

On my XP machine, to change the swap file location you'd go to SYSTEM PROPERTIES--ADVANCED--PERFORMANCE SETTINGS--ADVANCED--VIRTUAL MEMMORY CHANGE. It's probably the same for vista.

If either of those are being stored on your D: drive then that's probably the reason you're getting the message.

Both the swap file and TIF are hidden and won't show unless you enable the viewing of hidden files and folders.

message edited by DAVEINCAPS


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#7
December 14, 2013 at 05:30:50
these are the folders in the Recovery D: drive and there "date Modified"

Dell 3/20/2008
Joe-PC 11/28/13
Program Files 11/2/2006
Sources 11/17/2006
Tools 3/20/2008
Users 11/2/2006
Windows 3/20/2008
MediaID.bin 11/28/2013

I was also was able to figure that 11/28/13 was the last time that the system was successfully backed up


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#8
December 14, 2013 at 05:34:20
can I SAFELY delete the folders with the 11/28/13 motified date.

Also, what can I do to stop the backup files from going into the Recovery D drive.

I think we're getting somewhere
Thanks very mucg


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#9
December 14, 2013 at 07:11:08
You don't have to delete the 11/28/13 files, just move them to a different partition. Where do you normally store your backups?

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#10
December 14, 2013 at 07:43:12
Here's another thought, it won't hurt to just leave it alone and ignore the darn warning if you are not comfortable deleting files. You know why you are getting the error, it does not affect day to day performance. Make sure you do not accidentally install any further to that partition. I would agree with rider on moving rather than deleting any back up.

To err is human but to really screw things up, you need a computer!

message edited by HopperRox


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#11
December 14, 2013 at 09:12:13
I should have started this tread off by letting all know that I'm a novice at best when it comes to this stuff.

Thanks for your patience

How can I find out where my other backups have gone before? and How would I go about moving them? The backup process is done automatically.

Also how can I make a permanent fix so it doesn't happen again?

Thank again, Joe


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#12
December 14, 2013 at 10:03:12
As HopperRox stated, if you aren't happy deleting or moving files, it wont hurt to leave it alone. Your restore data is still safe in there, even though the rest of the partition is cluttered with other files.

So, it seems you have Windows set for auto-backups. It could well be the backups filling up the drive.
In itself, this is pointless because if your HDD dies, the backups die with it. they should be stored externally,not on your PC's hard drive.

For now, either turn off Windows backups, or direct it to an external hard drive - should you have one.


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#13
December 14, 2013 at 10:41:59
All you guys have been awesome-very helpful. Thanks.

I would like to keep the automatic backup function in place. Is there a way for me to adjust/change where the backup is stored? Anywhere but the D drive would work for me.
If that's not practicable, I will leave it alone and deal with the annoying error message.

Either way, Thanks so much.


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#14
December 14, 2013 at 11:30:08
You haven't stated which version of Windows you are using..
I'm assuming WIndows 7, using Windows own backup facilities, not third party software. Yes?

Does this help re removing old backups. At least it will free space on your D drive and stop the 'disk full' warning.
http://www.dummies.com/how-to/conte...

Or similar here:
http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorial...
To repeat. Backups should be on an external drive. Your C and D drives are partitions on the same hard disc drive. If the drive dies you lose the lot - backups gone!

You could back up using DVDs, but you may need several for each back up. How many, depends upon the size of your data base and whether you are backing up only files or a complete image of the hard drive.


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#15
December 14, 2013 at 17:41:07
If it's the 'system restore' backups that you think are being stored there, you can turn it off for that drive through the system restore settings. When you turn it off the files there should be automatically deleted.

Before you delete anything you should probably look through the Joe-PC folder to make sure you know what's there.


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#16
December 15, 2013 at 18:19:28
Thanks, all were very helpful.
Since I HAVE to select the best answer I'd say it was DAVEINCAPS's post on 12/13. That post led me in the right direction, but ALL were helpful to me the help me understand my problem better.
Thanks again

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#17
December 15, 2013 at 20:31:21
Well, you didn't HAVE to choose a best answer but it's appreciated. So I guess it's either fixed or you know what needs to be done?

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