downloaded vista service pack 1

November 25, 2011 at 13:54:31
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downloaded vista service pack 1 and laptop wont boot up properly

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#1
November 25, 2011 at 15:26:09
The same thing happened to me while trying to repair someone's machine. I was lucky enough to be able to copy their files to a USB drive & activate the recovery partition.

For years, it's been my policy not to download any MS update unless there was a problem. That was the only reason I tried to install SP1 on Vista for that customer.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
November 26, 2011 at 14:09:58
Care to be more specific?

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#3
November 26, 2011 at 17:41:24
I can't get any more specific than that. I had to reinstall the OS? If you want it in Spanish, tuve que instalar el sistema de operacion de nuevo.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#4
November 26, 2011 at 17:46:51
No, sorry, that was supposed to be addressed to the OP. I usually don't bother answering questions when the OP can't bother using a complete sentence, but I made an exception here.

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#5
November 26, 2011 at 22:17:33
I generally don't answer either but I had that exact problem. The only reason I had installed SP1 was the customer couldn't get internet & I had tried everything else.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#6
November 27, 2011 at 02:09:36
I can appreciate that if a user has one bad experience with a Service Pack it tends to make them wary of any future service packs, but in theory M$ doesn't deliberately produce them to screw up users computers, Vista does that by itself quite happily ;-). The service packs do a lot of jobs - you can read about what SP1 added HERE and occasionally one of the fixes affects software or hardware that has some sort of security or running issue. Hence you have to weigh up whether you want to carry on using your computer without SP1 and hope the original problem cures itself, or you find & remove the problem so that SP1 can carry on & do the rest of its job. Just ignoring it will come back & bite you eventually.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd


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#7
November 27, 2011 at 06:34:34
There have been cases where there were no problems & some update stopped the PC from working. That's when users decide to disable automatic updates. That can't be ignored either.

I'm in the process of repairing a Vista machine, for a customer. I'll have to make the SP decision soon, even though I have an easier way. I told her that I would call her children & tell them to buy their mother a new PC. That could be CP1 (Children Pack 1)

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#8
November 27, 2011 at 07:52:57
I've gotten several bad driver updates - video, sound and network adapters, and have grown wary. I've heard horror service pack stories, but never had one myself. What do you do, warn the customer ahead of time? Insist on taking a full image first? I don't know if a restore point will undo a SP.

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#9
November 27, 2011 at 13:08:25
If a customer brings a non-updated PC to me then the first thing I do is check whether they have backups then, if they haven't, I back-up their data for them and supply it on disk - chargeable of course :-). There's no point doing an image as you just end up at the same point again, so you just tell the customer that there could be problems, because they hadn't stuck to Microsoft's recommendation to use automatic updates. Then do my best to sort the problem & if it all goes pear-shaped then it's a straightforward reinstall, at customer's cost. End result, I get paid, customer learns a lesson, everyone happy.....

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd


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#10
November 27, 2011 at 14:24:29
Ah, the voice of experience and wisdom, indeed. Thanks John.

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#11
November 27, 2011 at 15:59:28
Problems can occur either way, because one listened to MS or because one didn't listen. It's a crap shoot. BTW, hold the dice in the V 3s if you shoot craps.

On the current Vista repair job that I have, I managed to get SP1 & SP2 installed. It seems to boot fine, now. Do I check for other updates or leave well enough alone? I'm taking votes.

Look for more updates? ___________
Don't look for more? ___________

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#12
November 27, 2011 at 19:38:10
Quite frankly, what I liked about John's response was laying most of the responsibility on the customer. I don't see any reason why the tech should be held accountable for the myriad things that can go wrong with an update.

What he can be held accountable for is data security. Thus the preliminary backups. I think that if I were in your shoes, I would do the updates, but first set a restore point.


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#13
November 27, 2011 at 20:10:12
Now that I have both service packs installed, the restore point has to be today or actually as soon as it passes midnight. That way it's guaranteed that both service packs are included. So it will be 11/28/11/

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#14
November 27, 2011 at 23:41:22
It tends not to be the 'fault' of the customer, it's often the customer's 'best mate'. I still come across customers who have XP and have never gone beyond SP1 'because my mate said it just messes up your PC'. That's great until you get an issue where the security is compromised, or a piece of software demands SP2, at which point, because it's been left so long, & they've probably downloaded the odd post SP2 KB pack which was needed for something else, they cannot get SP2 or SP3 to install.

On a completely fresh install of any version of Windows, the Service Packs will install faultlessly, whether they are slipstreamed or done piecemeal. If there is a problem with the Service Pack installs after Windows has been running for a while then there it's obvious that the fault lies with hardware or software that was installed after the initial install - nothing to do with Windows or the ServicePack, That's the part that needs sorting - easy!.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd


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