CPU fan replaced, now computer wont load

June 25, 2009 at 12:00:12
Specs: Windows XP
My computer was shutting down repeatedly and I learned from this site that it was overheating. I followed directions on what to check for and found that my cpu fan was completely crammed full of "gunk". I removed the cpu fan and heatsink per instruction and cleaned it out. Now that I've replaced it, the computer will not "boot up" I guess you could say. The keyboard lights light up and the fans all come on but the blue light on the power button does not come on and the monitor shows nothing. Is there something I did wrong? Or something I can do to try to fix it? I'm not loaded with knowledge of the inner workings of a computer, but am very capable of following directions.

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#1
June 25, 2009 at 13:20:22
Did you clean off the old thermal compund and add a dob of new compound?
Thermal compound is needed to make proper contact between cpu and heatsink, without it the cpu will overheat and fail.

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#2
June 25, 2009 at 17:50:45
Yes I did this, but even so, the cpu seems to not be powering up at all. I get no blue light on the power button and no response from my monitor. It was working fine, I had a couple of unexpected "shut downs" so I checked here, found out it was getting too hot, took out the cpu fan and heatsink and cleaned them, put them back in and now nothing. Is it possible I jarred the cpu and ruined it? I don't know how delicate these things are. I read a post where they were talking about "bent pins". What were they referring to?

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#3
June 30, 2009 at 19:13:58
Hmm....what kind of CPU do yo have?
When you applied the thermal paste, was the past white or silver? Silver is usually conductive, and can short out a processor if cross contact occurs. White is usually ceramic and is less conductive. It's possible your CPU could have fried.
It's best to have a spare to troubleshoot.

Did you apply the paste similar to a grain of rice, and spread evenly across the processor?

Ensure all cards are seated correctly, all cables plugged in correctly and all fans are spinning correctly.

Jarvis-Technician
TekTime
www.time4tech.com


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#4
June 30, 2009 at 21:08:12
"My computer was shutting down repeatedly and I learned from this site that it was overheating."
How do you know it was overheating-did you check the cpu temperatures in the BIOS ? Is the cpu fan connected to the motherboard securely ?

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