Solved connecting memory to laptop

December 17, 2013 at 06:29:55
Specs: Windows Vista
can I connect the 1 TB sata cavier hard drive taken out of my broken pc to my aspire410T laptop to increase the memory

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#1
December 17, 2013 at 07:27:37
✔ Best Answer
if you mean use the drive as a boost/addition to RAM - the answer is no... But if you mean to use the drive as extra storage - then yes...

Put the drive in a usb-extrnal drive case and it will be accessible as an extra hard-drive...

Ideally get case that is usb-3 (if your Aspire handle/can use usb-3). And if possible - get a case that has a fan cooling it... Large(r) drives can run warmer/hotter than many people realise and that "can" reduce their life and reliability.

As always, anything on the drive in your Aspire, or on the Caviar that is really important to you - "stuff" you wouldn't want to lose as it's irreplaceable... - copy it to optical media as well. Recent reading on an Apple/Mac site seems to suggest that DVD+r are more reliable etc. than DVD-R. Which if true... I'd opt for DVD+R.

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#2
December 17, 2013 at 08:52:13
"As always, anything on the drive in your Aspire, or on the Caviar that is really important to you - "stuff" you wouldn't want to lose as it's irreplaceable... - copy it to optical media as well. Recent reading on an Apple/Mac site seems to suggest that DVD+r are more reliable etc. than DVD-R. Which if true... I'd opt for DVD+R."

Why use CDs as the backup media? These days USB memory keys and external hard drives (especially SSD or Solid State Drives) are reasonably priced and will be faster and easier to use than CDs and you don't have to sit at your computer constantly changing out CDs as they become full.

An online backup service like Carbonite will work in a pinch as well if you're willing to pay for it.

CDs are gradually becoming obsolete, why bother backing up on those?

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#3
December 17, 2013 at 10:50:09
Usb flash drives/sticks have a limited write/rewrite cycle, and also not as reliable as dvd for long term storage. They are designed as short term devices; typically porting data about when a cd/dvd or a hard drive is less convenient...

No media is pefect either. Having one's critical "stuff" on one medium only is not really advisable either... DVD and another hard drive is minimum to go for... Also remember that like usb sticks... SSD have limited (albeit a very much larger one than usb sticks) write/rewrite cycle... All storage devices can - will - fail in the end; but diversification reduces the risks...

I'd feel much safer with opticals (good professional grades) and a decent mirror NAS system - which latter duplicated (or otherwise backed up) on a seperate hard drive. That latter drive being seldom accessed, other than to update and check occasionally. And opticals would also be checked at intervals, and new copies made too. NAS are not so many pennies these days, although I appreciate they may not be in everone's immedtiate budget and reach...

But for some that may seem like overkill... Until they lose that precious "stuff".

Having almost been there in the past... I know i don't want go there for real in the future...

And why pay for using someone else's servers to save your stuff? You can do it all yourself... And no risk of hackers, data loss due to failures at server farms...

Large corporates pay very high premium for their data storage and safety; a lot more than Jo public will be prepared to pay. And those same corporations will frequently have local backups/copies too - just to really safe...

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#4
December 17, 2013 at 14:32:15
Just to clarify, the term memory means RAM.

What you are wanting to increase is hard disk space.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

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#5
December 18, 2013 at 15:18:41
"Usb flash drives/sticks have a limited write/rewrite cycle, and also not as reliable as dvd for long term storage. They are designed as short term devices; typically porting data about when a cd/dvd or a hard drive is less convenient...
No media is pefect either. Having one's critical "stuff" on one medium only is not really advisable either... DVD and another hard drive is minimum to go for... Also remember that like usb sticks... SSD have limited (albeit a very much larger one than usb sticks) write/rewrite cycle... All storage devices can - will - fail in the end; but diversification reduces the risks...

I'd feel much safer with opticals (good professional grades) and a decent mirror NAS system - which latter duplicated (or otherwise backed up) on a seperate hard drive. That latter drive being seldom accessed, other than to update and check occasionally. And opticals would also be checked at intervals, and new copies made too. NAS are not so many pennies these days, although I appreciate they may not be in everone's immedtiate budget and reach...

But for some that may seem like overkill... Until they lose that precious "stuff".

Having almost been there in the past... I know i don't want go there for real in the future...

And why pay for using someone else's servers to save your stuff? You can do it all yourself... And no risk of hackers, data loss due to failures at server farms...

Large corporates pay very high premium for their data storage and safety; a lot more than Jo public will be prepared to pay. And those same corporations will frequently have local backups/copies too - just to really safe..."

I used to use USB sticks before the size of my backup outgrew them and I got an external hard drive. No problems at all with them whatsoever.

As you say, no such thing as a foolproof backup media, but if the device failing is of that great an importance to you then why not implement a RAID solution with mirroring? Just my 2 cents.

I guess it comes down to opinion, to me it's a waste of time to put backups on more than 1 media type, it's highly unlikely your PC and backup media will fail at the exact same time

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#6
December 18, 2013 at 16:08:03
I doubt there is any large corporate structure that still doesn't have two different sets of backups - and not on the same type of media…- for very serious material/content…

I know of one that "still" uses tape as local backup to a very complex (high end RAID) server system, with built-in fail-over etc… for office (fiscal and other) data etc…; and has server-farm access too… Also another that may well still do the same. Both are in the broadcast industry; and at least one of them also archives programme content (for short-ish periods) on tape - and long term on (dynamic hard drives - not SSD) high end Raid systems. Although there is an increasing reliance on the higher end Raid systems with a clear view to dropping off tape completely - which in the broadcast industry wouldn't be too difficult anon, and is already happening. And some "serious/VIP content" is still burned to opticals too… - just in-case...

As I say earlier, a domestic NAS isn't beyond the reach of many; and that at least can allow reliance on hard drives only - using a mirror system at the least… - but as the NAS manufacturers sometimes advise… also have a stand-alone backup HD too for the NAS...

For me to set up a (personal) duplicate media system and keep current… it's no time/effort at all…

it's highly unlikely your PC and backup media will fail at the exact same time

if only…

As I said earlier, having almost lost "stuff" in the not too distant past - when a drive died on a computer - "and" the backup hard drive turned out to be less than excellent… it started cough up errors various when accessed… I know where my preferences lie… It moved me to NAS (mirrored) at least… with stand-apart HD backup - and some opticals… The likelihood that the two systems will go down fully at the same time (and that means the mirrored drives both fail completely, and stand-alone HD too) I would agree isn't high; but for the sake of a little time/effort… one can secure against most things…

I would suggest too that reliance on optical "only" is also not really wise; they can easily be broken, damaged etc.. And there have been posted incidences of the latter here in the past (disks wouldn't read, skipped, or whatever…).

But as you say… "it's a matter of opinion…"; and I would add - "based on one's experience"...

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