Solved What is real mode DOS support in context to WinME?

Hewlett-packard / 1000
December 19, 2015 at 04:15:31
Specs: Peppermint 5, 1.5ghz cpu, 3.5gb ram, 1366x768 display
I am curious to know about this as everything on the internet says "Windows ME lacks real mode DOS support" but after google searches I coudn't gather up what "real mode DOS support" means. I really wanna know about this. By some googling I got to know its based on the 9x series, then how come it doesn't just support DOS? I am confused. Does it mean it will not run my DOS games?

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✔ Best Answer
December 20, 2015 at 00:50:22
Real mode dos support is dos without windows, the way it was before 9x came along. The dos commands found in 98 and to a lesser extent ME have been updated but do the same thing.

ME is basically 98 without the booting to and exiting to dos options. Oh it has different hardware support--mainly more support for stuff you'd plug into a USB port, although not nearly as good as XP and later.

In both 98 and ME you could open a dos windows and use dos commands, although that was usually called command prompt since it was done within windows. I think the dos internal commands--those in command.com--were the same as 98 but some of the external commands--those run from their own files--were removed.

Most bios' have an option that allows windows to change some of the hardware settings--port addresses and IRQs for example--to suit its needs. If you opened a dos window and ran some dos software, it ran under the windows settings. But in 98 for example if you exited to dos and ran the same software it would run with the original bios settings. Sometimes especially with games it was difficult to get them to run both in a dos window and in pure (real mode) dos.

Both 98 and ME have LFN support. But in real mode file names get shortened to 8.3 format. I can't remember if a dos window had LFN support or not.

There may be other technical differences that I never paid attention to but that's the gist of it.

Riider's link explains it well too.

message edited by DAVEINCAPS



#1
December 19, 2015 at 05:16:41
I supplied numerous links in your other thread. Plus you really need to work on your Google skills rather than having us continually do your work for you.

http://www.dewassoc.com/support/win...


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#2
December 19, 2015 at 08:48:15
excuse me, my google skill is upto the top notch. and your link does NOT answer my question. Try to understand the question well before answering. and btw i already mentioned i am confused!

message edited by jaysarma987


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#3
December 19, 2015 at 08:55:31
Real mode DOS is the original 16-bit MS-DOS. If support for it is missing then 16-bit programs will not run. But you have already been shown the way round this.

I'm afraid that I have to agree that this information is easily found using Google. You really need to learn how to use it effectively if you want to run these obsolete operating systems.


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#4
December 19, 2015 at 22:08:27
With 9x you could boot directly to dos or exit from windows into dos. With ME that option was removed. There were some third party modifications which were supposed to reenable real mode support but I never tried them. I think they did it by modifying the ME system files--io.sys, msdos.sys and command.com--and then adding any missing dos commands from a 98 WINDOWS\COMMAND folder that had been removed for ME.

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#5
December 19, 2015 at 23:04:23
thats not what i am asking, dave. i mean, what is this real mode dos support? rather than the boot, what things cannot be done? are all dos apps not supported?

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#6
December 20, 2015 at 00:50:22
✔ Best Answer
Real mode dos support is dos without windows, the way it was before 9x came along. The dos commands found in 98 and to a lesser extent ME have been updated but do the same thing.

ME is basically 98 without the booting to and exiting to dos options. Oh it has different hardware support--mainly more support for stuff you'd plug into a USB port, although not nearly as good as XP and later.

In both 98 and ME you could open a dos windows and use dos commands, although that was usually called command prompt since it was done within windows. I think the dos internal commands--those in command.com--were the same as 98 but some of the external commands--those run from their own files--were removed.

Most bios' have an option that allows windows to change some of the hardware settings--port addresses and IRQs for example--to suit its needs. If you opened a dos window and ran some dos software, it ran under the windows settings. But in 98 for example if you exited to dos and ran the same software it would run with the original bios settings. Sometimes especially with games it was difficult to get them to run both in a dos window and in pure (real mode) dos.

Both 98 and ME have LFN support. But in real mode file names get shortened to 8.3 format. I can't remember if a dos window had LFN support or not.

There may be other technical differences that I never paid attention to but that's the gist of it.

Riider's link explains it well too.

message edited by DAVEINCAPS


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#7
December 20, 2015 at 04:12:13
thanks a lot dave :) one last thing, will DOS games run as same on ME as it would in 98SE?

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#8
December 20, 2015 at 23:42:59
The main problem with old dos games is usually getting the sound card set up in windows in a way that the game can accept. Assuming that gets done (and you don't need to run the game in pure dos) then they should run in ME the same as 98.

Edit Oh wait, I just thought of a situation where that might not be true. Sometimes software is said to be compatible with 9x but is meant to run in dos. So when that program sets up in 9x it creates its own config.sys and autoexec.bat. When you click the icon in windows to start the program or game the system reboots and the original config.sys and autoexec.bat are swapped with the ones for the game and the system then boots to dos and the game starts. Then when the game is exited normally it reboots again and the original files are replaced. Since ME won't boot to pure dos I doubt software that sets up that way will run on it.

I can add to my # 6 that whether or not an OS has pure/real mode dos support is irrelevent if you're in windows. It only matters if you want to boot or exit windows and go to dos.

message edited by DAVEINCAPS


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#9
December 21, 2015 at 00:22:21
Im done. Hail DosBox :p

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