I got to start with Win98se (I think)?

January 17, 2011 at 15:07:23
Specs: win98, 350/254
I have a Dell desktop pc. It once had Win98se in it. It once had XP in it.(meaning the CDROM at that time installed all that).
I even had a full install of Linux for a time - but then converted back to XP. I am only assuming that the information was re-read off the XPPro CD which was in the drive when I went back to it.
Since that time... I changed out the CDROM for another CDROM but(forgot to install the driver for it). So the CDROM does not work on MS disks. It would kind of read Linux partially but not completely.
So in one of my brilliant moves I formatted C:
Lets start again.
I have Widows boot floppy and Window98 setup floppy and Windows98CD.
After putting in the Win boot and then the Win setup, it refuses to see the CDROM
The Dell came with a BENQ CDROM reader/burner and I swapped it out for a Creative CD reader.
I have the Creative CDROM driver on floppy.

Now I am kind of stuck as the CDROM is refused to be read because the CREATIVE CDROM INSTALL program (on the floppy disk) is looking for MSCDEX..exe

What do I do?

I was planning to format the C: drive again and then "Fdisk" it and try again

Even finding a format program is a problem.

So where am I going wrong?

I figure if I can get Win98 in then upgrade is no problem. This computer I speak of is off line.

signed...loose rusty nut behind the keyboard

whatcha gonna dew


See More: I got to start with Win98se (I think)?

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#1
January 17, 2011 at 18:28:49
1st of all, you don't need drivers for a CD drive unless you're trying to install from DOS. If you're unable to boot off a Windows disk, you either installed the drive incorrectly, the boot order setting in the BIOS is incorrect, or the disk you have isn't bootable.

2nd, your system doesn't have good enough specs to run WinXP decently. The CPU is too slow & there's not enough RAM. Even if you figure out how to get it installed, it will run like sh!t.

3rd, you do NOT have to install Win98 & then upgrade to XP. Why would you do that? You're just making more work for yourself. I think you're making a mistake trying to run XP on that antique, but if you insist on doing it, all you need to do is boot off the XP disk & follow the onscreen prompts. As I said, NO CD-ROM DRIVERS ARE NEEDED!

Here's the instructions complete with screenshots. The only thing left out of the description is the need to "Press any key to boot from CD..." at the very beginning. If you don't press a key, the installation will not start!

http://www.windowsxpprofessional.wi...

"I was planning to format the C: drive again and then "Fdisk" it and try again"

You have that azz-backwards. 1st you run FDISK, THEN you format. You can do it all from the XP CD anyway, no other disks or floppies are required.


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#2
January 17, 2011 at 18:58:08
The "CREATIVE CDROM INSTALL" would have installed a dos cdrom setup on the hard drive which, as already mentioned, you don't need. The 98 bootdisk should have cdrom support.

You should probably start over. I went into a tubesandwires kind of detail on setting up the hard drive here:

http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...

in my # 13.

The cdrom is a separate issue. Does it show in cmos/bios setup or on the posting screen? (You may have hit TAB or ESC to show the diagnostic posting screen if it's set to show the Dell logo instead.)

Real men don't use AntiVirus; they just reformat


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#3
January 17, 2011 at 19:01:01
Boot order is Diskette first

Secondly, why I am going the Win98 route is because the CDROM does not work without its driver.
It does not seem to function under the generic ones that Window supplies.
Speed is not an important factor on this machine, as I am not gaming or on line. But considering my other machines are XP Pro it is just easier if it was the same GUI.
So while it is the longer way in, I don't see another way in. I am definitely not going to swap the CDROMS again if I can avoid it.

""You have that azz-backwards. 1st you run FDISK, THEN you format"""" You are the first person to tell me that is backward. I thought format erases everything, including the partitions.

I don't know this, just asking.

whatcha gonna dew


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Related Solutions

#4
January 17, 2011 at 20:24:53
Set it so the cdrom comes before the hard drive. Such as:

Floppy
cdrom
hard drive

Then you should be able to boot with the 98 cd in the cdrom--if the cdrom is good and connected and jumpered right. (Well don't have a disk in the floppy drive if you want to boot from the cd.)

You say you have a 'windows boot floppy'. What is that? What operating system is it?

And what 'driver' do you keep talking about? If you boot from the cd no software driver is needed. If you boot from the 98 bootdisk it should have cdrom support and will load a dos driver that will enable you to start the 98 installation from the 98 cd.

I don't know what you have on the 'windows boot floppy' but you don't need it if you have the 98 bootdisk--or can boot from the cdrom.

Real men don't use AntiVirus; they just reformat


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#5
January 17, 2011 at 21:57:07
"Boot order is Diskette first"

As DAVEINCAPS stated, the boot order should be: floppy, CD-ROM, hard drive. If you have the hard drive listed before the CD drive, that's your whole problem.

"Secondly, why I am going the Win98 route is because the CDROM does not work without its driver"

Enough about the driver! The CD drive is an ATAPI device & does NOT need a driver! Are you sure you've installed Windows before? Go back to response #1 & re-read it! Make sure to click on the link that explains (in detail) how to install XP.

"You are the first person to tell me that is backward"

Then you're talking to the wrong people. FDISK is used to create or delete partitions. Formatting sets up the file system (usually FAT32 or NTFS) in the partition. 1st you partition THEN you format.


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#6
January 18, 2011 at 01:41:43
http://www.goodells.net/dellutility...

The driver for the CDROM drive can never be installed on the hidden partition because it's not a DELL device and only the Dell Restore CD can do that to begin with. Pray tell WHAT exact model of Dell desktop are we talking about?

The hidden partition that holds the CDROM driver links the drive and the computer together for eternity. That's what you get when you buy a Dell. The restore CD will allow you create the hidden partition with CDROM driver anew but it won't let you install just any old drive you want.

I think you need a Dell restore CD for your exact machine and you need to put back in the old CDROM drive.

1st you get rid of old partitions that don't do you any good like linux and XP's NTFS file systems on a desired to be a 9x box and/or hidden partitions that won't be useful to you anymore. THEN you re-partition, and then you format those partitions. But the required Dell Restore CD does all that automagically for you, and probably reinstalls win98se as well. Which is why you ought to look one up as soon as you can, it did come with the very one you need right now.

Lee


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#7
January 18, 2011 at 03:03:18
Just curious...Is it a very old Creative drive? Early drives (2x if I remember correctly) had to plug into a MKE interface card which was proprietary (even though it's 40-pin and looks to be IDE).

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#8
January 18, 2011 at 15:25:59
T-R-A has a good point, but it would have to be a VERY old CD drive & I believe it's cable had to connect to the sound card. Why did you remove the BenQ drive anyway? If you still have it, swap it back.

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#9
January 19, 2011 at 01:02:21
I am working from RamDrive(that is what is on drive D: However when I try to install the Creative36XMX CDROM Driver, that install program looks to C: drive for MSCDEX. C drive at this moment has ATAPI.
LEE: You are the first one that said that I may have to put the old CDROM back in because it was made for it.. I do not have a recovery disk for the computer so will have to hope it will work when reinstalled(it can't be any worse) Why did I remove it? Because the BENQ has a burner and I put it into a faster pc as the Creative is a read only CDROM.
Is that swap still possible even after say I get WinXPpro O.S. into the Dell?

I have noticed the XP does not recognize all CD-Roms as it was a "bitch" to get it to set up in the faster machine(basically a white box)

Or how do I create a DELL restore CD in a way that I can change the CDROM driver

The Dell is a GX OPTIPLEX 1

Lee you clued me in to the fact I may have problems because that is Dell.

But all you guys have helped in some way

Also, just a note about the CD-ROM, if I make it read from the CD-Rom first, it won't spin Windows disks, it will sort of spin Linux and half read it. It will change the OS
If there is no disk in there it is looking for a disk like every 5 seconds it revs up and down.
So it is driven, but I do not know by what.. So I got it to shut up by reading from the A: drive first instead.

So tomorrow, I guess I have to swap the BENQ CDROM over.

I was hoping for keyboarding way to do this rather than the manual way.

Thanks a lot for the help from all.

whatcha gonna dew


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#10
January 19, 2011 at 02:49:04
As cheap as standard ATAPI CD-Rom drives are now, I'd opt to just get a new one for the Dell machine:

http://www.geeks.com/products.asp?c...

http://www.pacificgeek.com/showcate...

http://www.bgmicro.com/COM1220.aspx

Beats having to swap around just to read a CD. Just make sure you have correct drive-rails to mount it in the machine; some of the older Dells' (like my OptiPlex GX110) had to have them for proper mounting (though it sounds like you know gathered that bit of info).

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#11
January 19, 2011 at 05:44:02
Here's a brand new IDE/ATAPI DVD burner for only $17 shipped for free:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

And please stop obsessing about the need for a driver - you do NOT need a driver! Assuming you only have the 2 drives (HDD & optical), put them on separate cables. The HDD should be primary master, the optical drive should be secondary master. Make sure the boot order is set to floppy, CD, HDD. Put the XP CD in the drive, boot the system & make sure you "Press any key to boot from CD..." when you see the prompt on the screen. It may be hidden behind the Dell splash screen. If you don't don't press a key, the system will bypass the optical drive & move on to the HDD. You can partition & format during the installation, there is no need to use any floppies when installing XP.


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#12
January 19, 2011 at 14:06:22
It does not boot from CD:
I have Win98se setup disk in drive A:
Windows 98se installation CD in the CDROM
Boot up order is A: CDROM; C: PXE
I am in RAMDRIVE
When it boots up I go for CD Support.
It really does not matter whether it is Win98, or XP or Linux
I get...CDR101 not reading drive E
If I no CD in the drive, the empty CDROM revs like a biker or racer at a red light. The drive motor works but once a disk is in, it shuts down. I figure some specific instruction is missing for the CDROM to work correctly. The Creative CDROM driver I did download is made to work in C drive and is looking for MSCDEX.EXE in that drive. I don't at this point have a C: drive(well what is in it is ATAPI.
The diagnostic tools were put on D drive. MSCDEX IS ON D: drive. The CDRom driver program will not be diverted away from C:drive.

So, that is where I am at.

whatcha gonna dew


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#13
January 19, 2011 at 14:44:08
"I get...CDR101 not reading drive E"

Have you ever installed Win98 before? Have you ever installed WinXP before? I don't know why you insist on doing things the hard way. Did you make sure the CD drive is being recognized in the BIOS? Is it on it's own separate IDE cable & jumpered as Master? Assuming the hardware is installed properly, here's what to do:

- put the Win98 boot floppy in floppy drive (leave the Win98 disc out of the CD drive for the time being) & boot the system
- select "start with CD-ROM support"
- pay attention to what's on the screen, it will tell you which letter is assigned to the CD drive. If you're using a boot floppy from Bootdisk.com, the letter will be R
- the screen will stop at the A:\> prompt
- insert the Win98 CD in the CD drive
- at the A:\> prompt, type R:\
- press ENTER
- the new DOS prompt should now be R:\>
- at the R:\> prompt, type setup
- press ENTER
- Win98 setup will begin

If you want to install WinXP:

- put the WinXP disc in the CD drive & reboot the system
- watch for the prompt Press any key to boot from CD...
- press ANY key
- WinXP installation will begin


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#14
January 19, 2011 at 18:16:09
"CDR101 not reading drive E" means the dos driver and mscdex have loaded but the cdrom can't read the disk. It means you have a bad cdrom or bad disk.

Unless you have a crappy bootdisk, mscdex is on it. It doesn't matter if that file is somewhere else too.

What is the model number of the creative drive?

Real men don't use AntiVirus; they just reformat


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#15
January 21, 2011 at 10:21:09
You nailed it on the head correctly.

Also too, the Creative36Xmx CDROM died at the same time and sort of "half works" [the light flashes in front but CD is not spun, and if CD is removed then the CDROM starts reving up its motor looking for a CD...which made me think that it did not have all the instructions to operate or a driver, I put the Creative back in its original machine and it acts the same way(in other words, does not work so no CD will be read from it.
This is why I was asking and had downloaded the Creative CD driver onto a floppy disk, as in the Dell machine I was in RAMDRIVE mode.
micliq was positive I did not need a driver.
If XP was in there or some O.S., I suppose that would be true.
Right now I have XP in the tray just so the CDROM does not hunt.

Thank you very much for your explanation about "how it works"

Why was I swapping in the first place? The Dell is a 550Mhz machine and the BENQ i s

whatcha gonna dew


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#16
January 21, 2011 at 10:28:24
You nailed it on the head correctly.

Also too, the Creative36Xmx CDROM died at the same time and sort of "half works" [the light flashes in front but CD is not spun, and if CD is removed then the CDROM starts reving up its motor looking for a CD...which made me think that it did not have all the instructions to operate or a driver, I put the Creative back in its original machine and it acts the same way(in other words, does not work so no CD will be read from it.
This is why I was asking and had downloaded the Creative CD driver onto a floppy disk, as in the Dell machine I was in RAMDRIVE mode.
micliq was positive I did not need a driver.
If XP was in there or some O.S., I suppose that would be true.
Right now I have XP in the tray just so the CDROM does not hunt.

Thank you very much for your explanation about "how it works"

Why was I swapping in the first place? The Dell is a 550Mhz machine and the BENQ has "burner capabilities" The Creative does not. So moved the BENQ to a faster machine which was not a Dell.
So after the swap, and the swap back, it looks like I must reswap again to get a working CDROM.in my faster machine.
Lots of screwdriver work.

whatcha gonna dew


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#17
January 21, 2011 at 13:28:01
"micliq was positive I did not need a driver"

You still don't get it! The Win98 boot floppy already contains the CD drivers, but they are ONLY necessary if you're going to install Win98.

If you're going to install XP, there is absolutely no reason to load CD drivers or even use a floppy disk at all. Everything you need is on the XP disc but you MUST have a working CD drive so that you can boot off the disk! I supplied a link on how to install XP & even explained it in plain english, but you keep asking about a friggin driver that isn't even required. Read this over & over again until it sinks in:

"If you want to install WinXP:

- put the WinXP disc in the CD drive & reboot the system
- watch for the prompt Press any key to boot from CD...
- press ANY key
- WinXP installation will begin"

Notice that there's absolutely no mention of drivers or using a floppy disk. Why? Because you do NOT need them!!!!! All you need is a CD drive that works & is installed correctly!


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#18
January 21, 2011 at 19:08:09
Yeah, it looks like you were concentrating on a dos driver when instead the cdrom itself was bad. Once you get a good cdrom installed you should be able to boot from it with either the 98 or XP cd. With 98 of course you can use the floppy bootdisk but its usage is mostly a remnant from the days when a PC couldn't boot from the cdrom.

Let us know how it works out.

Real men don't use AntiVirus; they just reformat


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#19
January 21, 2011 at 20:17:06
melee5 had the correct information. Dell is configured only to the one brand of CDROM that is in it(BENQ). Dell will not accept ANY other CDROM replacement.
Something I did not know.
It was half working and half not working using a Creative CDROM and how it worked was: if a CD is in the tray, it does not spin....if there is no CD in the tray - then the CDROM revs up and down looking for a disk.
"That is why I went the floppy route, figuring that the Creative CDROM was lacking information for itself to operate correctly. >I was working from RAMDRIVE as the computer had been formatted out of NTFS.
(as it previously had XPpro in there when the BENQ CDROM was in place
So forget the idea I could just put in a CD... it was blind or cripple or just dumb
It did not see Windows, or Linux CD's
I have swapped the CDROM back to the BENQ and the Dell works and I have reloaded XP.
The Creative36Xmx CDROM is back in its original machine, but it looks like it either has forgotten how to work or has died. As I do not have an extra CDROM out comes the BENQ and popped back into my faster machine.

Why I initially was doing this is because the Creative is a reader,
the BENQ had burner capabilities.

I did not see a problem in swapping the same type of hardware.

That is all.

PS. If the Dell is going to "run like s--- with XP", it is definitely faster than s--- that just "lays" there.

It is utilized more for storage and simple word processing.

whatcha gonna dew


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#20
January 21, 2011 at 20:51:25
I've never known of a computer only accepting one brand of cdrom and I've worked with a lot of old Dells. Where did you get the idea that was the case? It just doesn't make any sense.

Real men don't use AntiVirus; they just reformat


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#21
January 21, 2011 at 21:07:47
I read all the posts. Read post #6 Either he is right or it is because my CDROM happened to die at that time.

It does not make sense to me but there is that possibility that it could be that way, right.? As a friend brought their Dell Optiplex GX1 by and it is loaded with a BENQ CDROM. Maybe they all were?
I am just a dumb operator.

whatcha gonna dew


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#22
January 21, 2011 at 21:37:52
# 6 is about restoring the OS either with a second partition on the hard drive or a restore cd. The restore cd for your Dell will only work with it and perhaps some closely related models. But the cdrom doesn't matter. It's the restore cd and not the cdrom that's model-specific.

Most or all of the GX1s may have come with Benq drives but that's just because Dell is going to make them all similar and not because Dell wanted to make all other cdrom models incompatible. If you installed a different model and it didn't work then it was either a coincidence, you damaged it while installing (zapped it with static, maybe?), its jumpers were wrong or its connections were bad or loose.

Real men don't use AntiVirus; they just reformat


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#23
January 21, 2011 at 21:55:34
Speaking of its connections--is the data cable in good condition and tightly connected to the motherboard on one end and the cdrom on the other?

Also, the terminals in the 4-wire power connector can sometimes get flared out and not make good contact. On occasion I've had to use a small flat-edged screwdriver and use it to push the sides of the metal terminals together, making them have a smaller diameter so they fit tighter on the drive. Or, you may need to use a different connector. Your power supply probably provides one or two extra.

Real men don't use AntiVirus; they just reformat


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#24
January 22, 2011 at 06:53:55
"Dell will not accept ANY other CDROM replacement"

That is 100% bullsh!t. Do you realize that there are jumpers on the rear of CD drives that MUST be configured for the drive to work? Look at the back & you'll see a jumper cap & pins that are marked MA (MAster), SL (SLave), or CS (Cable Select).

I told you in an earlier response to put the CD drive on it's own separate cable as set it as MASTER. I doubt very much you paid attention because you've fought everything I've told you thus far. SOME Dell machines prefer the Cable Select jumper setting. If you have CD drive & hard drive on the same cable, BOTH should be jumpered as Cable Select. The hard drive MUST be on the end plug, the CD drive on the middle plug.


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#25
January 22, 2011 at 07:37:23
The following is from Dell about configuring the drive jumpers for the Optiplex GX1:

"You must configure all EIDE devices for the Cable Select jumper position, which assigns master and slave status to devices by their position on the interface cable. When you connect two EIDE devices to a single EIDE interface cable and configure them for the Cable Select jumper position, the device attached to the last connector on the interface cable is the master or boot device (drive 0), and the device attached to the middle connector on the interface cable is the slave device (drive 1). Refer to the drive documentation in your upgrade kit for information on setting devices to the Cable Select jumper position."

http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

"I am just a dumb operator"

BINGO!


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#26
January 22, 2011 at 13:49:12
To mick. I can read. The CDROM jumper was set to master and it has a single strip(no side connections) that goes into it own seperate IDE port. And the Ide cable has been checked and it is 100%.
So, everything is set up the way it should be(cables are good and plugged in tightly and correctly).-I do observe things- before dismantling them.
When I took out the originally installed BENQ and swapped it over with the "Creative" CDROM(which was also jumpered similarly).
At that point (the switch) is when the problem occurred.

So, swallow your pride - you may know a lot, but there is always room for learning something else from somebody else(such as melee5).

signed
the dumb operator.

I am finished with this CDROM swap...

It may be just coincidence, but the Creative CDROM act just as ignorantly when I put it back into the original PC(which is also XPpro)
it is doing exactly the same things it was doing in the Dell.
(flashing green light but will not spin "any CD") : go to CD drive in "My Computer" and click on "Eject" and tray opens. Properties identifies correct CDROM device so the computer knows it is there.
Close empty tray and then CDROM hunts for a CD, reving up and down every 5 seconds.
This "dumb operator" still thinks it is needing some instructions.

But what do I know? Less than you, yes. That is why I ask. If I knew, I would not ask ; and you would not be able to "Feel" superior.

These computers are only 10 feet apart, so the switching happened within 20 minutes. No static, no nothing. Power plugs were pulled and internet connection disconnected. So no sources of power.
Nothing is forced, it is all slipped into place..
I am going to have to assume that the Creative CDROM broke in the 20 minute period(rather than it just be a setting)

If I get this to work on my own, then the differences between us becomes a very fine line.

But, thank you for the reference on the " Y " connectors as I am about to embark in hooking up some additional HDD and wondered about that. I knew it once before, but have a bad memory sometimes.

Finished with the Creative3630E CDR101 in the Dell.

Thank you all.

whatcha gonna dew


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#27
January 22, 2011 at 14:54:04
OK, now go back & read again what I put in bold. That info is not coming from a "superior" computer tech, it's directly from Dell's website. Let me snip out the important part, which just happens to be the very 1st sentence:

"You must configure all EIDE devices for the Cable Select jumper position"


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#28
January 22, 2011 at 20:40:22
I think the Dell directive to use cable select is because that's the way they set up their drives originally. The assumption being that if that's a Dell standard then a person adding or replacing any drives doesn't have to take the other drives out to see how they're jumpered. Well, that's my guess anyway. I've never run across a bios that cared how the drives were jumpered, as long as they were consistent--no mixing of master/slave and cable select jumpered drives.

I don't know why swapping the drives seems to render them inoperative. My first guess would be jumpers; the second being the're being damaged in some way during the process. I considered the power supply was not putting out the correct 5 and 12 volts but if that were the case I think you'd have other hardware malfunctions.

Real men don't use AntiVirus; they just reformat


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#29
January 23, 2011 at 10:39:43
what I took out was "master" jumpered BENQ What I put in was "master" jumpered CREATIVE. Other than the brand name change I myself did not see any problems either.

I am still working on the mickliq suggestion from Dell (which seems like a bunch of ca-ca because both the HDD and the CDROM have their own IDE plugs and both were set to master(originally). No other devices at this time. So why the cable select when they are a straight IDE ribbons ? isn't that illogical?

When I reinstalled the BENQ back in(leaving the jumper in the Master position as it was when I removed it) the Dell PC fired up and read off the CDROM as usual.
[so maybe it way by chance that the Creative CDROM "kissed it"
at that particular moment] - it is not like I have a bunch of CDROM's laying around so there is no way to check(except that the Creative does not work in its old PC either and acts just as goofy as when it was in the Dell.(CD in tray=won't spin and green light flashes every 2 seconds /no cd=hauls ash looking for a CD with no light)

I think I am going to go ice fishing instead. Thanks for the input.

"Hell, I never win at lotteries
[but I always win at losing]".

whatcha gonna dew


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#30
January 23, 2011 at 12:05:50
As long as the bios sees the cdrom then it's pretty much done it's part. And if that's the only drive on the cable then jumpers aren't likely to be a problem. It could still be a bad cable I suppose.

Here's some background on cable select and its cables:

http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/i...

Oh, another thing. Your hard drive is probably connected with an 80-wire cable and the cdrom with a 40-wire (both have the 40 pin connector of course). I've had occasional problems connecting a cdrom to an 80-wire cable. So if your cdrom is connected with an 80-wire, try a 40 instead.

Real men don't use AntiVirus; they just reformat


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#31
January 23, 2011 at 12:13:08
"So why the cable select when they are a straight IDE ribbons ? isn't that illogical?"

Just posting what I found on the Dell site regarding the Optiplex GX1. Did you try the Cable Select setting?

"When I reinstalled the BENQ back in(leaving the jumper in the Master position as it was when I removed it) the Dell PC fired up and read off the CDROM as usual"

As usual? What does that mean? How do you know it's reading? Did you put a CD in the drive & you can access the files on it? If so, then's what's all this crap about needing a driver? Just put the XP CD in the drive, reboot the system, press any key when the "Press any key to boof off CD" prompt appears on your screen, then commence installing XP.

Then you can post in the XP forum about how slow the system is with a 350MHz CPU & only 254MB RAM...lol


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#32
January 23, 2011 at 17:38:12
I am not here to fight.

Mickliq, you have suggested both the master jumper and then copied out what Dell says(which is cable select)

I took out a "Master" jumped BENQ CDROM which was working at the time in the Dell PC.(burner capability)

I put in a "Master: jumped CREATIVE CDROM which worked in its PC at the time prior to the switch as it was "just a reader CDROM".

So, basically all I changed was brand names of the CDROMS(and some speed).

I could not see why it did not work in the Dell (what step did I miss)?

All cables are good. I even swapped IDE cables and IDE ports on the board - just to do something different. All connections are good. All pins are there in the !DE(non bent) or missing.

When I have it open to "My Computer" the D: drive shows up. and if I click on it to make it blue; then open and close the tray with a CD in the tray, the pointer arrow will show a CD for a moment and then disappear. It does that about 8 times and no more tiny CD is shown.
Properties of D drive is under general tab: file system unknown. CD shows 0 bytes free, 0 bytes used (I have WinXP in the drive.)

So, is this what a dying CDROM does? It is my first.
Just wanted to be sure it was not a setting somewhere like on Control Panel/Add New Hardware.

If all that is automatic, fine.

The Dell can see and identify correctly the CDROM.

This Creative has been dying slowly because for a while it was only reading Linux CD's (spin them up and read them and I could install Linux) and would not touch Windows O.S.'s
Now it ignores the Linux CD...except it knows a CD is in the drive when I open and close the tray.

No use to buy another CDROM to find it is just as screwed up as the one I got just because of a setting or something inane like that.

I can buy beer for $20.00.

Thanks for the advices. I realize it has been a pain. I hope not to run into this situation again - well, now I know what to look for when it is actually dying.

whatcha gonna dew


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#33
January 23, 2011 at 17:41:07
Missed a bit. Cable select and D drive is non-existant.

whatcha gonna dew


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#34
January 28, 2011 at 08:37:31
To complicate matters, keep in mind that not all CD drives are capable of booting off a CD ROM if the drive is not El Torito compliant. This is the case with many older computers, I've run into this with most computers manufactured before 1997.

Here are the Windows XP Floppy Disc Boot disks to load CD ROM support at startup:

"How to obtain Windows XP Setup disks for a floppy boot installation" (October 25, 2001)

The direct downloads are here are below. The floppy disks are not universal with all versions of Windows XP! It is extremely critical to download the correct set of disks based upon (1) consumer or professional version and (2) service pack level based on the CD ROM disc version.

Windows XP Home Edition (October 25, 2001):

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=E8FE6868-6E4F-471C-B455-BD5AFEE126D8

Windows XP Professional (October 25, 2001):

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=55820EDB-5039-4955-BCB7-4FED408EA73F

Windows XP Home Edition Service Pack 1 (SP1) (September 9, 2002):

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=FBE5E4FC-695F-43E5-AF05-719F45C382A4

Windows XP Professional Service Pack 1 (SP1) (September 9, 2002):

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=83F53BE9-28FA-40E8-8EC2-631504EF5E26

Windows XP Home Edition Service Pack 2 (SP2) (August 25, 2004):

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=15491F07-99F7-4A2D-983D-81C2137FF464&displaylang=en

Windows XP Professional Service Pack 2 (SP2) (August 25, 2004):

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=535D248D-5E10-49B5-B80C-0A0205368124&displaylang=en


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#35
January 28, 2011 at 09:05:14
This discussion has ended for me. I got to snag another CDROM...so it seems

I thank you all for your input. No one ever mentioned power supply incompatibility.....maybe it got a bit more juice than it needed and something fried? >Still looking for a mechanical cause to it. failing<.

whatcha gonna dew


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#36
January 30, 2011 at 07:20:38
sdfox 7,

Read the entire thread again. friedemann had a fully working Dell system UNTIL he swapped optical drives - he took out a working BenQ CD-burner & replaced it with a Creative CD-ROM. The entire "swap-out" procedure should have been explained in detail right from the start (model numbers, jumper settings, type of IDE cable, etc), but instead he obsessed over the need for a driver. And although it was explained to him that ATAPI devices generally don't need drivers to work, the quest for a driver continued.

Personally, I have never seen an XP disc that isn't bootable, same goes for Linux. Some Win98 discs are bootable, some require a startup floppy. CD drivers are already on the startup floppy so the need to search for a specific CD driver & add it to the floppy is almost never necessary. Detailed instructions on how to install XP & 98 have been provided, whether they're being followed correctly or not is anyone's guess.

If the original Benq CD-burner is returned to the Dell, using the exact same cable & the exact same jumper settings that were used originally, the drive should work, it's as simple as that. If it doesn't, then friedemann isn't using the exact same settings or he damaged something during all the swapping back & forth.


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#37
January 30, 2011 at 10:04:58
The simple swap thing is what I did (NO static electricity occurred) I shut off and unplugged both PC's. I don't do this stuff for a living. These are my machines so they are handled like "Fabroshe eggs".
"Drivers" if they are required, are the last thing that is put in...most times I have to be told that is what I am missing.
I can get a driver for a Creative CDROM off the net. Now, if it did not need one, why can I get a driver?
The Benq CDROM which was put into another machine brand also did not work.
There is more to swapping a CDROM than just undoing a few screws.
Both machines have the same O.S.(one was just faster than the other is the "only difference")
I had a lot of guidance to get the BENQ by reconfiguration.

(a driver is available on line for the BENQ CD/DVD rom on line.
I can see CD's and burn CD's but not DVD's?)

Because, I doubt very much that I could have blown 2 working CDROM's...I am not that lucky.

You never said once that an ATAPI system does not need a driver. Not until the dead end speech.

The fact that the motor inside still revs up when there is no CDROM
-partially will spin and read a Linux disc(as I did once replace
Windows with Linux and then switched back to XP (by uninstalling
Linux)
-will not even spin or read any type of Windows disc in the end.
says something is weird.
You suggest buy another CDROM. What difference is that going to make if the motherboard has its circuits in a knot someplace?

whatcha gonna dew


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#38
January 30, 2011 at 13:48:23
Do we really have to go thru this all over again? For starters, we have no idea of how much or how little you know about computers. I guess the same can be said about me. To set the record straight, I'm not a rookie nor am I a kid. I'm in my 50's & have been building & repairing computers since the days when Win3.1 & 486's ruled the PC world, in other words, well over 15 yrs.

Running thru the entire thread, I cannot find one instance of where you stated your system specs. You never even stated that you have a Dell Optiplex GX1 (we had figure that out for ourselves), nor have you ever listed the model number for the BenQ. You slipped in the info about the Creative 36Xmx about 1/2 way thru the thread, however, that is not the actual model number. The drive is most likely a Creative Labs CD3630E. The model number can be found just under the word CREATIVE at the upper left of the label:

http://pchistory.ru/wp-content/uplo...

http://ebaymonkeys.com/images/36995...

The optical drives being ATAPI devices was mentioned way earlier in this thread. Even if it wasn't, you should have run across that info somewhere while doing your searches. The CD driver is only necessary if the OS disc you're using isn't bootable. As I said early on, Linux & XP discs are bootable, therefore no special driver is required. Some Win98 discs are bootable, the ones that aren't DO need a driver - but the drivers are already on the 98 boot floppy. No additional drivers are necessary. And even if you wanted to use some specialized driver, it's not as simple as just copying it to the 98 boot floppy. I believe you'd also have to edit the config.sys & autoexec.bat files on the floppy.

One thing you've never stated is whether you're working with actual Windows discs or burned copies. Some older drives have problems reading burned CD-Rs.


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#39
January 30, 2011 at 15:02:58
You and me are from the same era, however I was before MS 3.1 (PCDOS/BASIC/COBAL/FORTRAN.
Not a repair person (because there was no such thing as a personal computer,yet.)
If you read post "1", I basically asked it all right there,so I thought.
And if I am asking, obviously I must be doing something wrong...so there are going to be errors in my statement. Nobody asked to know what model of Creative CDROM I had.
I (not knowing any different) cannot see any difference in knowing that. I just assumed the driver is missing BECAUSE the Creative worked half assed.(It would spin up Linux but would not do Windows) after I did an uninstall of Linux (which was fully installed on the harddrive)

(besides what do you buy that does NOT come with a driver CD?

I assumed the the CDROM would be no different. Excuse me. I have never had to buy one seperately.


Something was wrong with the CDROM in that it was still reading Linux, but not Windows.

Was Linux not fully uninstalled out of the CDROM? There is no memory for it in the unit I would have supposed.

To finish this off, if the CDROM is not working correctly for "some reason" then I don't care how bootable the CD is because the CD is not being read. That makes sense, right?

The BIOS settings were all correctly done and yet something was not right.

The driver thing is the last thing I even think about(mostly I forget it) but that is the reason "why I had to first install Win98se (because I have drivers that are Win98 disks and these drivers I have not found on line(also I did not know how to get an XP PC to read a Win98 disc.
So, I went the long way around so I could install these drivers because they came with the printer/scanner or webcam or mp3 player. Then once all the drivers I had (which came with the devices) were installed, then I upgraded to XP. Everything still works.
I got burned copies of Win98se and XP
While the Creative CDROM was in its original machine I loaded both the Win98se and the XP and the Linux and then the XP without a whimper.
The same story for the BENQ while it was still in the Dell PC.

I thought the "purpose of a driver" was to make those setting adjustments automatically.

I am not trying to make a conflict out a question of "is there something I still have to do?"

whatcha gonna dew


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#40
January 30, 2011 at 16:01:34
New CD/DVD drives used to always come with a setup disk but it was only dos drivers since windows had built in support. As I came across them I'd always keep track of which driver was for which cdrom but then I realilzed it didn't matter as they were all universal atapi drivers, well except for some of the earlier proprietary ones.

It's probably been 10 years since I've bought a new one so I don't know if they still include the driver disk.

A driver disk for any hardware is only needed if the OS doesn't already support the device.

The mantra of the aging hippie--"Power to the government, right on"


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