Solved Help me to change bios to show 5.25 floppy

Ibm 4849mnn windows server 2008 rok0 sma...
November 2, 2015 at 18:33:06
Specs: Windows 98, 386
configure bios to run 5.25 floppy drive
Is there a way to change the bios to show a 5.25 floppy drive?

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✔ Best Answer
November 5, 2015 at 10:09:42
Further floppy info that just isn't covered very well for what ever reason is that the use of pin 3 for 5 volt only drive detection system on modern systems will cause older systems to report drive not ready error, until you dismember your pin 3 from the drive itself such that there is no connection to ground as this pin was used for in ancient times. Ground is not needed here anyway and some BIOS are watching this line for a positive to indicate a 5 volt only drive is installed (PS-2 days). If they see a ground as would be the case in older drives being plugged in, then the BIOS reports drive not ready condition and it will NEVER work with intact pin 3.

Truly modern 3.5 drives have then resorted to using pin 3 as a missing pin and their matching cables will have a solid block here to prevent one from plugging the cable in backwards. And other pins are now also 'blocked' with solid blocks as well, none of this seems to be very well documented and very hard to find due to plethora of hits on floppy subjects mainly. Top and bottom center key methods failed for the most part to be compatible with each other to the point that no sense can be made of it now. But pin 3 non-use is consistent and can lead to troubles when used with a drive and suitable cable that actually has a pin 3 grounded. Remove the pin and the ancient drive can now work.

Lee



#1
November 2, 2015 at 21:07:41
Probably. You want to install it on a 386? A 386 bios should have support for both 5.25 types--360K and 1.2M--and it should be fairly easy to setup. If you're trying to install it on the newer server in your tag that bios may not have support for those drives.

Tell us how you intend to connect it. Will it be the only drive on the cable or will a second drive be connected as well? Does the floppy cable have the 7-wire twist in it or is it a straight cable?


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#2
November 3, 2015 at 03:55:32
I am connecting with cable

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#3
November 3, 2015 at 18:54:28
Well yeah, there's no other way to connect it.

Floppy drives have Drive Select (DS) jumpers. How you set them depends on the type of cable you're using. Floppy cables now have a 7-wire twist in them:

http://superuser.com/questions/8490...

(where the arrow is pointing in the first picture.) When using one of those cables the drives need to be jumpered to the second DS position. Most 3.5 drives are already jumpered that way and sometimes you don't even have access to their jumper. But 5.25 drives often aren't jumpered that way as those cables weren't the standard when those drives were popular.

That's why I asked all those questions.

Anyway, assuming that's the cable you have, and the drive(s) are jumpered correctly then the one you want as drive A: goes on the end of the cable, after the 7-wire twist. A second drive (if you're using one) goes before the twist and will be Drive B:. So it'll be like this:

motherboard connection-----drive B:----7-wire twist-----drive A:

And of course the cable you use will have to have slide on connections (vs the pin connectors that 3.5 drives use). Some cables have both types so you can mix 3.5 and 5.25 drives.


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#4
November 3, 2015 at 19:42:54
Would also help if you told us what kind of make/model of machine you're working on. Specs such as "Windows 98 / 386" doesn't say much about the machine. If it's truly a 386, then there's a possibility that the BIOS can only be accessed via boot floppy (which obviously requires a working floppy drive) or some combination of keystrokes---depending on what BIOS the machine has.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#5
November 5, 2015 at 10:09:42
✔ Best Answer
Further floppy info that just isn't covered very well for what ever reason is that the use of pin 3 for 5 volt only drive detection system on modern systems will cause older systems to report drive not ready error, until you dismember your pin 3 from the drive itself such that there is no connection to ground as this pin was used for in ancient times. Ground is not needed here anyway and some BIOS are watching this line for a positive to indicate a 5 volt only drive is installed (PS-2 days). If they see a ground as would be the case in older drives being plugged in, then the BIOS reports drive not ready condition and it will NEVER work with intact pin 3.

Truly modern 3.5 drives have then resorted to using pin 3 as a missing pin and their matching cables will have a solid block here to prevent one from plugging the cable in backwards. And other pins are now also 'blocked' with solid blocks as well, none of this seems to be very well documented and very hard to find due to plethora of hits on floppy subjects mainly. Top and bottom center key methods failed for the most part to be compatible with each other to the point that no sense can be made of it now. But pin 3 non-use is consistent and can lead to troubles when used with a drive and suitable cable that actually has a pin 3 grounded. Remove the pin and the ancient drive can now work.

Lee


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