Solved Windows 8 Pro Upgrade License confusion

Toshiba / Satellite c650 19t
December 30, 2012 at 14:12:46
Specs: Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit, Intel i3 350M (2.27Ghz) 6GB RAM
I have the £50 Windows 8 Pro CD. I would like to dual boot this with Windows 7 Home Premium. I have been told that it is legal by some people and illegal by others but would like to get the opinion here.
I have been advised against it because of the space usage and conflicts with licenses of programs such as ms office but want to try to dual boot anyway (for windows 8 app development).

So basically: A Windows 8 Pro Dual Boot with Windows 7 Home Premium. Legal or illegal?

Thanks Phil22 for your response to my original question. Your answer won't be ignored.


See More: Windows 8 Pro Upgrade License confusion

Report •

✔ Best Answer
January 1, 2013 at 08:34:28
"I simply left it at the factory defaults of an equal split"

I've never seen a drive configured that way from the factory, then again, different manufacturers do things differently. For example, HP HDDs come with 4 primary partitions - the hidden Win7 boot partition (100-200MB), OS partition, Recovery partition, & HP Tools partition. When I bought an HP laptop for my kid this fall, I immediately created the recovery disc set, then wiped out both the Recovery & HP Tools partitions. Then I shrunk the OS partition to a reasonable size & created a Storage partition out of the remaining drive space. IMO, it's foolish not to have a Storage partition. It obviously won't protect your data if the drive fails, but if Windows gets borked & has to be reinstalled, all your files will should remain intact.

"I did add another partition for drive paths because drive letters can get unreliable sometimes. It's 60MB"

I've never heard of doing this before & don't see the point. Please explain.



#1
December 30, 2012 at 15:03:29
You really haven't provided enough info. Does your Win7 HDD have multiple partitions, or do you plan on partitioning it, or or do you plan on installing Win8 on a 2nd HDD? Do you have the Win8 Pro disc (btw, it's a DVD, not a CD) or Win8 Pro Upgrade disc? Please clarify what it is that you want to do & how.

The upgrade disc is generally used to 'upgrade' from another OS. In other words, it will replace the whatever OS is currently on the HDD. However, if the Win8 upgrade disc works the same way as the Win7 upgrade disc, you should be able to use it to do a clean install of Win8, if you know the trick.

I saw your response in another thread where you recommended only using one partition. You stated that a system will run faster with just one partition vs a system with 2 or more partitions. IMO, that's very poor advice. I think you need to do your homework about partitioning.

Windows 8: A ‘Christmas gift for someone you hate’


Report •

#2
December 31, 2012 at 03:11:21
The question was aimed at whether or not it would be legal but thanks for your detailed response.

My hard drive was partitioned by default and I didn't mind because I kept the second partition empty.

I plan to install Windows 8 on the second, empty partition with the Windows 8 Pro disc. I am assuming that it isn't an upgrade because it doesn't say upgrade on the box.

I installed the Release Preview on Oracle's Virtual Box so I have a bit of an idea of what I'm doing.

I'm not a pro or anything but I assumed if you partitioned a hard drive in two, one partition would get the outer rim of the disc (faster) and the other would get the inner.
I also read an article about partitioning on Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disk_p...
In the advantages it said it might speed it up because the MFT would be smaller but disadvantages said:
"Reduces overall disk performance on systems where data is accessed regularly and in parallel on multiple partitions, because it forces the disk's read/write head to move back and forth on the disk to access data on each partition[2][3] and to maintain and update file system administration areas on each partition."
I'm not sure whether or not it speeds it up but in my opinion and experience, using partitions for anything other than dual boot or perhaps backup is not a good idea.


Report •

#3
December 31, 2012 at 09:30:48
"in my opinion and experience, using partitions for anything other than dual boot or perhaps backup is not a good idea"

You need to rethink your opinion.

In the title of your thread, you wrote "Windows 8 Pro Upgrade License". If you don't have the Upgrade disc, I don't see what the problem is? The HDD should be prepared with at least 3 partitions - one for Win7, one for Win8, one for shared data storage. You can either pop the Win8 disc in the drive from within Win7, or you can boot off it. Just make sure you select the correct option (Custom, not Upgrade) & direct it to install to the correct partition.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
December 31, 2012 at 09:35:27
I got Windows 8 installed with the disc and it gave no dual boot option. Now I'm simply running Windows 8 on its own.

EDIT: It never gave a choice for custom.


Report •

#5
December 31, 2012 at 12:29:37
"It never gave a choice for custom"

What's the size of the HDD & how was it partitioned? I don't think you will get the 'custom' choice without a 2nd partition to install to. You should have popped the Win8 disc into the DVD drive from within Win7 rather than booting off it.


Report •

#6
January 1, 2013 at 01:33:52
That's the funny thing. I put it in when logged in to Windows 7 and then started regretting it thinking that I would have got the option for custom if I booted off it. My hard drive is 320GB but it actually works out at 296GB. I simply left it at the factory defaults of an equal split (I did add another partition for drive paths because drive letters can get unreliable sometimes. It's 60MB). Each partition is 148GB.

Report •

#7
January 1, 2013 at 08:34:28
✔ Best Answer
"I simply left it at the factory defaults of an equal split"

I've never seen a drive configured that way from the factory, then again, different manufacturers do things differently. For example, HP HDDs come with 4 primary partitions - the hidden Win7 boot partition (100-200MB), OS partition, Recovery partition, & HP Tools partition. When I bought an HP laptop for my kid this fall, I immediately created the recovery disc set, then wiped out both the Recovery & HP Tools partitions. Then I shrunk the OS partition to a reasonable size & created a Storage partition out of the remaining drive space. IMO, it's foolish not to have a Storage partition. It obviously won't protect your data if the drive fails, but if Windows gets borked & has to be reinstalled, all your files will should remain intact.

"I did add another partition for drive paths because drive letters can get unreliable sometimes. It's 60MB"

I've never heard of doing this before & don't see the point. Please explain.


Report •

#8
January 1, 2013 at 13:50:02
I used to have an external hard drive with a lot of my programs on it. I found if I unplugged it and plugged it back in, it would rarely get the same letter. Drive Paths (in computer management) allowed a work around. I set up a partition (could have done it as a folder) and had these links to the hard drive. Of you went through a drive path it was like a shortcut but didn't use drive letters. I eventually moved the programs to internal hard drive and found how to reserve drive letters but never deleted the drive paths partition.

By default my laptop also had a recovery partition (400mb) that I forgot to mention. I guess I could delete it because I have a recovery disc set and a hard drive clone.


Report •

Ask Question