Solved Why does the link to resetting my password not work

June 29, 2015 at 15:45:38
Specs: Windows 8
I was sent a link for resetting my password and even after cutting and pasting it I am told that there are no matches. Any help would be appreciated

Kathleen McCarthy


See More: Why does the link to resetting my password not work

Report •

✔ Best Answer
June 29, 2015 at 17:00:21
Ignore it... Almost certainly it's a scam, physhing - or worse...

Unless "you" deliberately seek to reset a password - don't respond to such "messages".

I get quite a few of these each month. They go automatically into the Spam/junk folder.

Invariably they are from sources with whom I have no contact; some allegedly from a bank - which I may or may not have connections to. Some allegedly from M$ and similar sites - e.g. Adobe...

Often it's sufficient to click on/open the email body/text to enable some pests to insert themselves... Which is why such emails are best ignored/deleted without actually opening.

It would be wise at this time to run a few cleaner apps - all free and safe to use. Install each using the manual/custom option - NOT the automatic. And carefully uncheck all pre-checked boxes (so helpfully checked for you...) as that way you will avoid installing a load of stuff you neither want nor need. Install only the utility itself.

In this order:

adwcleaner

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/dow...

Junkware Removal Tool (JRT)

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/dow...

JRT installs to the desktop - from where you run it. It will open into a small window style window; follow the intructions therein. It will reboot the system as part of its process.

malwarebytes

http://filehippo.com/download_malwa...

and for good measure:

ccleaner

https://www.piriform.com/ccleaner (Scroll down the page to ensure you download the free version).

Retain any logs generated - incase of future reference/need.



#1
June 29, 2015 at 15:47:45
How about giving us a clue what password you mean - there are stacks of them?

Where did the link come from?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#2
June 29, 2015 at 15:50:41
What password are you talking about. That sounds like a phishing scam. Beware of this type of email, sounds like someone is trying to hack a password. Don't respond to this type of mail unless you know it's legit.

Report •

#3
June 29, 2015 at 16:08:05
To reset your password, click this link.
https://adobeid.services.adobe.com/...

If you cannot access this link, copy and paste the entire URL into your browser.

I had to cut and past (instruction #2, and I got the message "no matches"


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
June 29, 2015 at 16:53:25
OK, I take it you don't know what this password request was about either. In which case don't touch it because, as others have said, it is most likely a scam. Links don't just arrive out of the blue and the identity looks highly suspicious. If you really need to change a password for something or other (unlikely) you will soon find out.

The best thing to do right now is run a quick check on your computer for malware. Run these freebies in the order given and let us see what they find. These three are safe and used widely on this forum and security forums generally because they often unearth what your Antivirus can miss:

AdwCleaner:
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/dow...
(blue Download button near top - not anything else on the page).
Download and "Save" the file somewhere. Go to the saved file then double click it to run the program. Use the "Scan" button, followed by the "Cleaning" button.

Junkware Removal Tool (JRT)
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/dow...
(blue Download button near top - not anything else on the page).
Download and "Save" the file somewhere. Go to the saved file then double click it to run JRT. It might appear to have stopped at times or flash the screen but sit tight until it has finished.

MalwareBytes:
http://filehippo.com/download_malwa...
(green Download button top right - not anything else on the page)
Install and Run the program but before doing its Scan go to "Settings > Detection and Protection" and put a checkmark in "Scan for rootkits". Quarantine anything it finds.

Please copy/paste the logs on here so that we can see what they found.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#5
June 29, 2015 at 16:54:25
never mind. ignore

message edited by grasshopper


Report •

#6
June 29, 2015 at 16:56:06
grasshopper

That appears to be the same as the link the poster gave us in #3.
Do you know what it is?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Report •

#7
June 29, 2015 at 17:00:21
✔ Best Answer
Ignore it... Almost certainly it's a scam, physhing - or worse...

Unless "you" deliberately seek to reset a password - don't respond to such "messages".

I get quite a few of these each month. They go automatically into the Spam/junk folder.

Invariably they are from sources with whom I have no contact; some allegedly from a bank - which I may or may not have connections to. Some allegedly from M$ and similar sites - e.g. Adobe...

Often it's sufficient to click on/open the email body/text to enable some pests to insert themselves... Which is why such emails are best ignored/deleted without actually opening.

It would be wise at this time to run a few cleaner apps - all free and safe to use. Install each using the manual/custom option - NOT the automatic. And carefully uncheck all pre-checked boxes (so helpfully checked for you...) as that way you will avoid installing a load of stuff you neither want nor need. Install only the utility itself.

In this order:

adwcleaner

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/dow...

Junkware Removal Tool (JRT)

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/dow...

JRT installs to the desktop - from where you run it. It will open into a small window style window; follow the intructions therein. It will reboot the system as part of its process.

malwarebytes

http://filehippo.com/download_malwa...

and for good measure:

ccleaner

https://www.piriform.com/ccleaner (Scroll down the page to ensure you download the free version).

Retain any logs generated - incase of future reference/need.


Report •

#8
June 30, 2015 at 06:26:18
It's still unclear if she wanted to change her password and was sent a link to do so, or was the link sent to her by someone trying to hack her info. If she doesn't respond, we'll never know.

Report •

#9
June 30, 2015 at 09:38:39
Very true... One read/interpret information posted initially in so many ways...

If it was bona-fide (genuine) response to "her" request to change/reset a password, then usually the message simply requires one to click on a link within the message in order to proceed further?

That's been my experience with just about any site where I've had need to reset a password.

message edited by trvlr


Report •

#10
Report •

#11
June 30, 2015 at 18:44:35
Thank you, I will try that and get back/.

Report •

#12
July 2, 2015 at 15:27:35
Please ignore this message; I double posted. Sorry.

message edited by belfastgirl


Report •

#13
July 2, 2015 at 15:38:07
I thank all who tried to help me re a link not working to reset my password.

I did know the link I was signing into; it was to reset the password to an Adobe account I had but the link they sent did not work.

Thanks again for your help. I will just try again and hope for the best..

Regards.


Report •

#14
July 3, 2015 at 17:12:59
Presumably you requuested the change of password - typically by using the "forgotten pasword option" when you tried to login to an Adobe acount? If so then repeat the login routine and request the password reset again? That way you will get a fresh link to the password reset?


edited by trvlr to correct typos

message edited by trvlr


Report •

#15
July 4, 2015 at 13:03:17
Consider it done, and thank you all very much.

Report •

Ask Question