Solved Unable to defragment in Windows 8.1.

May 9, 2014 at 11:16:47
Specs: Windows 7, C2D E7400@2.8Ghz
Hi

I recently updated my Windows 8 to Windows 8.1 and after that when I went to defragment the drive the Disk did not defragment properly. The Defragmenter runs and optimizes the C drive just fine but not the D and System Reserved. After optimization the status is as follows:


C: OK (0% fragmented)
D: OK (2: fragmented) - DOES NOT SHOW 0% LIKE IT USED TO BEFORE
System Reserved: Needs optimization (18% fragmented) - REMAINS THE SAME

The D drive only has 700MB free and the whole partition is 95GB could that interfere with the defrag. And what about the system reserved I want it at 0 too.

How can I defrag D and C to 0%

message edited by Sarah_Ramirez


See More: Unable to defragment in Windows 8.1.

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✔ Best Answer
May 11, 2014 at 13:37:06
Why are you concerned about this?

The purpose of defragmentation is so that when you are using the system it can quickly locate information which will be in continuous blocks. There can be a performance benefit.

Drives that are system reserved are rarely (if ever) used so do not need defragmenting. It is safer to leave them totally alone.

Similarly if your D drive is a data disk it is simply for storage and not used for running programs. You will never notice any difference if this is defragmented as it is only used to store and access your own data. Forcing defrag for that drive is pointless and best avoided.

If you can defrag the C drive that is all you need to do. Even that, with modern drives makes little difference unless it is heavily defragmented - seems, at present, it is not defragmented at all.

Have you got the latest update which was made for Windows 8.1 (via Windows Update)?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek



#1
May 9, 2014 at 13:05:54
My C drive wouldn't show zero after the new 8.1 update. I found that if I ran the "Analyse" first then the "Optimize" it then worked fine thereafter - worth a try.

Having said that:

1. There is no need to defrag the "system reserved area" which is an important area that is best avoided.

2. Your main system drive (presumably C) is the only one that matters, slightly, to performance.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#2
May 9, 2014 at 14:54:34
Just in case it is an SSD ( Solid State Drive ) This type of drive you don't defrag.

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#3
May 9, 2014 at 15:12:40
Yes, good point John.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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Related Solutions

#4
May 9, 2014 at 19:33:13
Your D drive is probably your recovery partition and also best left untouched so that is will still work if you ever need it.
Your system reserved partition is used at boot up and Windows should not have access to it during normal use or you may not be able to start the system again.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
May 10, 2014 at 07:53:54
If drive D has some 94GB of data on it then it seems a heck of a lot for a recovery partition. Maybe it is a data drive - perhaps the poster can let us know.

In either case there is no need for defragmentation, which is only of advantage when a drive is in frequent use by the system. As already given, you should not defrag an SSD if that happens to be the case.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#6
May 10, 2014 at 09:47:11
Okay so there is no recovery partition on the hard drive. the D drive is a data drive which is in use all the time with apps and stuff. And It is not an SSD drive.

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#7
May 10, 2014 at 11:02:38
OK thanks, so doing defrag is fine although only "necessary" on the system drive as previously given.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#8
May 10, 2014 at 14:42:50
More here.

Disk Defragmenter in Windows 8 | 7 explained
http://www.thewindowsclub.com/disk-...
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-AU/...

message edited by Johnw


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#9
May 10, 2014 at 15:14:24
Did you try "Analyse" first?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#10
May 11, 2014 at 12:43:05
Derek - Yes I analyse the drive first and then optimize.

Johnw - the information in those links say that there should be at least 15% free space on the hard drive in order to defrag it properly and my D drive only has 1% free space. There is method to force defrag. I'll try that and let you know.


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#11
May 11, 2014 at 13:10:16
I freed 20% on the D drive and then tried everything but nothing worked. Now 2% is fragmented and nothing happens to G drive which is system reserved. It remains at 18 percent fragmentation.

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#12
May 11, 2014 at 13:37:06
✔ Best Answer
Why are you concerned about this?

The purpose of defragmentation is so that when you are using the system it can quickly locate information which will be in continuous blocks. There can be a performance benefit.

Drives that are system reserved are rarely (if ever) used so do not need defragmenting. It is safer to leave them totally alone.

Similarly if your D drive is a data disk it is simply for storage and not used for running programs. You will never notice any difference if this is defragmented as it is only used to store and access your own data. Forcing defrag for that drive is pointless and best avoided.

If you can defrag the C drive that is all you need to do. Even that, with modern drives makes little difference unless it is heavily defragmented - seems, at present, it is not defragmented at all.

Have you got the latest update which was made for Windows 8.1 (via Windows Update)?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#13
May 12, 2014 at 09:49:57
Derek -
I have latest updates.
And I'm gonna leave them alone if those drives won't make a difference in performance.
Thanks for the help though.

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#14
May 12, 2014 at 09:56:15
OK, thanks for popping back to let us know.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#15
October 13, 2014 at 13:23:53
I don't think you should automatically assume the D drive is just storage. Most people have a separate drive for intensive programmes like games where a defrag is most certainly required.

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