Solved How to get rid of radio interference

January 20, 2016 at 04:45:55
Specs: Windows 8, J2900@2.41GHZ 4.00 GB
Everytime I use my computer I get a news report from a radio station in the US, it only lasts for about 10 seconds. This has only happened in the last few days. Any ideas on how to stop this please.

Brooklyn

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✔ Best Answer
January 22, 2016 at 09:10:20
Thanks for all your replies to my query, I disabled ethernet and used wi-fi only, this seems to be working ok.

Brooklyn



#1
January 20, 2016 at 08:33:48
That's an odd one; but not entirely unique...

Is your computer a laptop or a desktop? Also where are you located (don't give out your actual address or email or phone details...) which country?

Try rebooting the router (power down, remove mains in and wait 2-30seconds); then power up again.

Check the connection from isp into the router is a decent one; that the cable in is OK - not frayed etc..

Perhaps run a few cleaner utilities too. ccleaner is one that comes to mind - as possibly you have a pest lurking...

https://www.piriform.com/ccleaner - get the free version.

Install it using the manual/custom option - NOT the proffered/default automatic. Carefully watch for and uncheck any pre checked boxes - apart from the actual utility itself. That way you avoid installing all manner of stuff you neither need nor want; much if it a PIA to eradicate.

Have to say I'm not overly hopefully the above will resolve the problem; but no harm to try.

Presumably you're using wifi only for your network/internet - not ethernet/cat-5? If wifi does the problem persist if you disable wifi (on the router) and or your computer and use ethernet only?


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#2
January 20, 2016 at 09:43:24
Have you managed to determine whether the radio station is nearby? I'm just trying to eliminate breakthrough. Yes we need to know if it is a PC or laptop and all about your internet connection.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#3
January 20, 2016 at 18:48:51
My guess is it's not interference but rather some site your browser is going to without your knowledge or maybe some news service add-on. The recommended malware scans will probably turn up something.

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#4
January 20, 2016 at 20:08:35
Along the lines or #3, look into your browser for any new add ons that need to be disabled or removed.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
January 22, 2016 at 09:10:20
✔ Best Answer
Thanks for all your replies to my query, I disabled ethernet and used wi-fi only, this seems to be working ok.

Brooklyn


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#6
January 22, 2016 at 10:43:54
mmm - "cross talk" as interference (in broadcast environs) is sometimes referred to can be due to earthing/grounding problems... Also quality of a given cable may also be an issue...; and whether or not its shielding is still OK.

Oddly this sort of event is less common/generally rare in the UK; but is not unknown (i.e. more common in Canada/USA) which have a different system of electrical wiring to that used in UK, and also Europe (which latter is different to UK - but not dissimilar).

I'd be inclined to check the earth/ground connections of mains outlets; and also even the actual house mains distribution/circuit breaker/fuse box itself. "Could" be there is a less than perfect earth/ground somewhere; possibly even missing... If earth/ground connections, and cable screenings are not all as they ought to be - one can get all manner of "interference/cross-talk" from spurious outside sources...


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#7
January 22, 2016 at 11:41:31
There was a reason I asked earlier whether it was a PC or laptop (not yet answered).

If it's a PC with separate speakers sometimes the leads can act like an antenna and pick up interference. The reason it can get in that way is because the internal amplifier has what is known as a feedback path, which links to output to the input.

What I've found can help is winding any slack on the speaker leads back and forth (a few inches at a time) to cancel the signal - put a band around it to keep it from unwinding.

This might sound far fetched but I once lived near a TV transmitter and used the above and various other tricks to stop interference getting into audio equipment. I used to do TV and Radio repairs in those days.

I appreciate that it is only happening on Ethernet but interference can be very subtle and moving things just a short distance can cause a change. Trvlr is right about grounding because you can get "ground loops" that inject interference into input paths. That is a topic in its own right.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#8
January 27, 2016 at 19:57:19
To Derek, I have a PC, I do not use speakers only use headphones which are connected to the computer. I have disconnected ethernet from the computer. I also had my internet connection checked out and that is fine. So far no more interference. thanks for your input much appreciated.

Brooklyn


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#9
January 28, 2016 at 05:45:05
Makes me think the Ethernet cable was picking up the interference if switching to Wifi fixed it.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#10
January 28, 2016 at 07:17:34
My thoughts too. Screening may be faulty; or even tres poor kwality..; or one end of the cable not properly connected (within the crimped plug)

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#11
January 28, 2016 at 09:09:58
Many possibilities but it's not unheard of for a bad joint to act as a detector (diode) for radio signals.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#12
January 28, 2016 at 09:42:19
I seem to recall tales that one could even use fresh (moist - not dry) potato as detector with 2 pins acting as the actual connector to an earpice (olde style moving magnet/coil). And also even a pice of coke would work the same way...

Which having said I never managed to get a crystal set to work; but had no problems with a one valve (tube in N. America) radio set; the 1N5 pentode acting as a leaky grid detector in a simple trf receiver...


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#13
January 28, 2016 at 13:47:26
I did manage to make a crystal set work (with an aerial right down the garden) but it was much easier when I used a germanium diode. One critical factor about the headphones is that they had to be high impedance (unlike those used today), otherwise the headphones damped down the tuned circuit which near killed it off.

Wow 1N5, leaky grid, and trf - those brings back memories. I did knock up some superhets too and still have the signal generator which I used to tune the IF's to 470 kHz (well Kilocycles in those days). I didn't care about safety much then either and quite commonly used live chassis techniques to save big expensive transformers. You just had to ensure the mains lead was the right way around then ensure the knobs were insulated. It would be a job for the police and courts these days but then I still remember Mum ironing from the lamp sockets. It was only 240V after all LOL.

EDIT. Brooklyn
I hope you can excuse us stealing your thread for this nostalgia binge.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

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#14
January 28, 2016 at 19:46:37
To all those who suggested different ways to get rid of the radio interference to my computer, I thank you all very much.
The problem has been solved. I just use the ethernet connection.

Brooklyn

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#15
January 28, 2016 at 21:04:26
Ahh, just let the old folks reminisce. It helps them get a good nights sleep. LOL

Have I ever mentioned how many miles and feet of snow I had to walk through to get to school?

I thought it was the ethernet you disconnected but the wifi was OK?

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