Windows 7 x64 SP1 won't boot

October 25, 2011 at 15:20:54
Specs: Windows 7, 2.1 GHz / 4GB
I am fixing a laptop that won't boot. It's OS is Windows 7 SP1 x64. When booting, it goes to "Starting Windows" with the Windows logo. After that disappears, the PC reboots. When using Startup Repair, it says it can't fix the problem. I used a tip from Microsoft TechNet where it tells me to delete bootcat.cache from C:\WINDOWS\System32\CodeIntegrity and that did nothing. What do I do to fix this problem?

If God is phone, then who is door?


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#1
October 25, 2011 at 17:34:20
Use the tip from microsoft pages to use bootable dvd of windows 7 to repair the install.

1/3 of highway deaths are caused by drunks. The rest are by people who can't drive any better than a drunk.


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#2
October 25, 2011 at 20:52:55
Tried it, still won't work. The whole problem was caused by the laptop overheating during a CHKDSK session, and shutting down. What should I do?

If God is phone, then who is door?


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#3
October 25, 2011 at 21:02:49
Run system restore from Windows 7 Repair Disk to before the problem happened.
Then address the heating problem, if it is running hot normally, you may have a build up of dust that needs to be cleaned out, or too many programs/processes running in the background.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#4
October 25, 2011 at 23:09:13
if the above fails, save all files, do a factory restore, if its still overheating strip down the machine, clean and repaste the cooling blocks, get rid of all the accumalated dust. its a long job thats why repair stores charge a lot of money.

i hate computers!
but cant help myself....


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#5
October 26, 2011 at 06:30:45
Normal Win 7 disk cannot perform repair installation on Win 7 with SP1 installed. You must find a Win 7 disk with SP1 integrated.

Or you should boot to Win 7 advanced options by pressing F8 repeatedly before Win 7 tries to load after the BIOS post screen and do a system restore from there to a time before the failure has occurred.

By the way, how do you know the machine overheated while performing CHKDSK ?

CoolGuy


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#6
October 26, 2011 at 20:03:49
It will fix it but you then have to return sp1.

If it is over heating then you need to fix that.

1/3 of highway deaths are caused by drunks. The rest are by people who can't drive any better than a drunk.


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#7
October 26, 2011 at 20:17:40
I did say 'Repair Disk' not Install Disk. Anyone should have made a repair disk from their installation, but even if they did not, they can use another computer with Windows 7 of the same type (32bit/64bit) preferably with SP1 to make the disk on. Then this disk can be used for the repair and one option after start up repair is system restore. They can try both a start up repair and also a system restore that can access existing restore points, but uses the repair tools on the disk instead of relying on the corrupted ones on the damaged computer. I have found that this repair has worked when enough system files have been corrupted and the built in repair tools could not.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
October 26, 2011 at 22:22:42
System restore failed. And, the system runs hot normally due to it being a studio laptop. The heating paste was replaced with some Arctic Silver thermal paste (It was replaced because it was crusted to the CPU and heatsink). Anyway, I can't do a "factory restore" because it originally came with Windows Vista (waste of system resources, as well as time, and a good PC), and I wouldn't return to that. Ever. Anyway, the whole "Restore Disc" thing and "System Repair" disc are the equivalent to "Repair My Computer" option in the F8 boot menu. And that didn't work. So, I will back up the user's necessary files and reinstall Windows 7. Thanks for the help.

If God is phone, then who is door?


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#9
October 26, 2011 at 22:24:45
Oh, and I don't know that the system overheated during CHKDSK. It has a history of overheating, therefore, I used that as the reason for it powering down. It could have been unplugged and the battery died. I don't know how it shut down, just what happened after it did shut down.

If God is phone, then who is door?


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#10
October 27, 2011 at 03:40:23
"...a system restore that can access existing restore points, but uses the repair tools on the disk instead of relying on the corrupted ones on the damaged computer." As I said, they are the same tools but often will work when the original ones fail.
Reinstalling MAY be your best bet anyway, but you need to see if there is anything to improve the heating issue.
"The heating paste was replaced with some Arctic Silver thermal paste (It was replaced because it was crusted to the CPU and heatsink)."
Whenever the heat sink is removed the thermal compound needs to be replaced, BUT was the correct amount and method used? Too much, too little, or spreading it and leaving air bubbles (gaps) can cause poor heat transfer. Look here:
http://www.arcticsilver.com/methods...
to make sure.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#11
October 27, 2011 at 13:17:34
You need to fix the overheating.

1/3 of highway deaths are caused by drunks. The rest are by people who can't drive any better than a drunk.


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