Solved Windows 7 Toshiba Qosmio laptop won't boot up

Microsoft Windows xp media centre editio...
October 17, 2014 at 14:51:50
Specs: Windows 7 Home Premium, 3.06GHZ/960MB RAM
Toshiba Qosmio won't boot up in regualr or safe mode. When I turn it on I get a menu that give me a repair menu but even that doesn't help. Can someone suggest some ideas?

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✔ Best Answer
October 29, 2014 at 15:33:08
Thanks trvlr,

yes I see the window folder. In fact I replaced some of the dll's in the system32/drivers directory because when I boot into safe mode with command prompt it gets so far and stalls. I was thinking that maybe one of them was corrupted. However this didn't seem to help.

Great news!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!. Before I had to submit this I got back to looking at the machine and I was able to fix it. Here is what I did;

Using the Windows repair disk I got myself into dos prompt. Running the chkdsk was the last thing I was going to try before trying to recover or reinstalling windows. I mentioned before that it said it couldn't run it without unmounting the volume. Since I was at the end I decided to go ahead and say yes. I ran a chkdsk /r /f. It looked like it fixed a few things. I exited dos prompt and restarted the computer. It got a point where it said it was configuring windows. I took this as a good sign. When it finally completed and windows opened, there was a bucnh of apps open including Excel withoput 5 spread sheets. My guess was that someone shutfown the computer forcefully while windows updates were being applied.

Anyway it all looks good now.

I really want to thank you Trvlr for your guidance and suggestions. I was great having someone who had sugegstions on what to dio and to steer me in the right direction.



#1
October 17, 2014 at 14:52:48
My appologies. I specified Win XP in one spot and Win 7 Home in another. I originally thought the computer was XP but later found out is actually Win 7 Home edition.

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#2
October 18, 2014 at 14:08:42
What changes were made to the system the last time it booted correctly? What happens when you try and boot to Safe Mode? If it's Windows 7, it will actually indicate that on the Repair/Restore screen. Are you getting the Restore option? Or just the Repair Windows screen? At what point does it fail after selecting an option?

More information would allow us to help you.


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#3
October 18, 2014 at 19:11:50
Make a Windows 7 Repair disk on another Windows 7 machine (back up section) as long as both machines are either 32bit or both 64bit. Boot to the Repair Disk (CD) and from the Repair options on the Repair Disk try both the Start Up Repair and the System Restore. The System Restore uses the restore points on your hard disk but uses the restore engine on the repair disk so it does not really matter if the machine is badly corrupted, it still should repair.

If these do not work, consider that the RAM or hard drive may be bad. Run Memtest86 via a bootable CD to test the memory. Then run the hard drive mfg's DOS version of their utility via a bootable CD (or Seatools from Seagate) to test the hard drive. Run the short test. Report results.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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Related Solutions

#4
October 18, 2014 at 21:56:31
Sorry for the delay. I had to work today and didn't get a chance to look at this.

Jennifer,


I am fixing this for a colleauge whoi is nto real computer illerate, so I am not sure what changes have been made since the last good boot up. I get the launch repair window and then it just goes to a black screen and does nothing.

Fingers,

Doing a google search (model PQF65C-00M02d), it appears to me the machine is 32 bit. the trick will be to see if I have a 32 bit machine that I can make a repair disk with. If I make a 64 bit repair disk, and try to boot with it, and it turns out the bad machine is 32 bit, will it fail or give me an error or what? DDoes it matter if the Windows is Home Premium or Enterprise when I make the repair disk?


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#5
October 19, 2014 at 15:54:55
Hi everyone,

had to work again today but I found a machine that is 32 bit. I am on my way home to make a DVD repair disc and will see what happens.


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#6
October 20, 2014 at 22:03:12
hi,

I have made a windows 7 repair disk. I tried to boot the computer with it and it starts to load the files, get to the Microsoft logo and then just goes to a black screen. Is this indicative that maybe I have the bit version wrong?


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#7
October 21, 2014 at 06:19:07
Okay indeed it was the 32 bit vs 64 bit. I made a 64 bit repair CD and this time I get all the way. Unfortunately the repair gives me a message something to the effect 'the repair cannot be done automatically'. The only other thing I saw was a diagnostics test which tested the memory which I am sure came back okay. It was hard to tell because when the machine rebooted after the test I got a blue screen of death. I am going to try run it again this morning. I am able to get to a DOS prompt so hopefully I can get any files off of it that are needed. Anything other suggestions from anyone at this point?

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#8
October 21, 2014 at 06:58:18
If you want to rescue files from the HDD you can either slave it to a working machine either with an external enclosure or physically installing it in the case of a desktop PC. From there you will be able to navigate through the files and rescue what your colleague wants.

You can also boot to a Linux live CD and retrieve files this way. Some of the helpers here are seasoned in using this method and can help you with the finer details. This method will also have a two pronged effect. Because it loads into RAM you will know soon enough if the RAM is causing the issue and it is a way to rescue files.

message edited by btk1w1


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#9
October 21, 2014 at 07:14:04
Thanks for the idea of the recovery. Anyone have any ideas of actually recovering the nachine. it seens the repair disc has limited options.

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#10
October 21, 2014 at 07:46:22
How many sticks of RAM are installed in the laptop?

If there are 2 you can try removing one and going through the repair process again. If the same problem occurs you can try again with the other. This is just to rule out a possible RAM issue. Although you have run diagnostics on the machine often they require hugely extensive testing to rule out a bad memory module completely.


Edit. Are you also able to capture the blue screen error code? If it flashes too quickly you can try recording it with a mobile phone and reviewing it to pause at the moment it appears. It will help to pinpoint the problem.

message edited by btk1w1


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#11
October 21, 2014 at 09:51:19
Thanks I will remove one stick of memory at a time and see what happens. I will aslo try the phone because the blue screen is really quick....less than a second or two.

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#12
October 21, 2014 at 09:53:47
One of the things I should also have mentioned is that I am now running an extended diagnostis check. The default is standard. The screen says 'Although it may appear inactive at times, it is still running. Please wait until testing is complete...'.

It has been sitting at 10% complete for almost an hour now. Shall I assume it is hung, or let it go?


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#13
October 21, 2014 at 10:04:12
I would (if possible) concentrate first on safeguarding any data (the "stuff" one wouldn't wish to lose).

The Linux boot disk routine is one easy way; need more on that approach - post back and pholks here will oblige...

Removing the hard drive and either installing it a slave in another desktop/tower system is equally viable; but a littler effort. Similarly connecting the hard drive (once removed from its current home) via a usb adapter is another approach to the same end. And again it requires a little more effort (one has to remove the drive, and secure a suitable usb adapter kit - a set of cables that allow the drive to be accessed via a usb connection).

Once data (personal "stuff") has been copied to say dvd (at least), and the copies verified as being OK (accessible by at least one other working system), then one can safely set about various options and routines to recover/rebuild the faulty operating system etc.

Ubuntu.com is where to download an ISO for ubuntu; burn it to a dvd; boot with that dvd. It will load into RAM only and the hard drive is then merely a resource for Linux OS (installed/running in RAM only); and one can then access its contents and copy as above...

Do not opt to actually install ubuntu if offered that option; simply run it from the dvd.

Puppy Linux is another Linux variant and some prefer it over say Ubuntu; all a matter of personal tastes and experience...

These Linux variants are "free".


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#14
October 21, 2014 at 18:32:04
I recommend running Memtest86 via a bootable CD to conclusively test the memory. Run it through all tests (I think it is 9 of them) though some recommend letting it run more than once through.
I recommend running the hard drive mfg's utiltity DOS version from a bootable CD. Most hard drive mfg's offer this on their website, Seatools from Seagate will work with most hard drives. Run the short test which is non-destructive to the data.
Many of the above suggestions to save the data before getting too involved in testing and recovery is a good idea. These include moving the drive to a working desktop as an internal drive, using an external case or adapter cord to connect the drive via USB, and running a Linux variant (I've used Puppy Linux for this purpose before). Save the files to an external hard drive, another internal hard drive on a desktop, or DVD's (and more than one if the files are really important), but make sure that the files are accessible before proceeding.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#15
October 22, 2014 at 13:46:51
Thanks everyone for their suggestions. I took out the memory chips one tried one at a time but whetehr I pick 'startup windows normally' or ''launch startup repair', the machine will not start up. The first option gets to the Starting Microsoft Windows and just sits there. The second option gets to a blank black screen and just sits there.

I will try remove the hard drive first and connect to another system via usb. This should allow me to run a virus scan against it. Also as for getting any data off right away, when I boot with a Windows Repair disk, does that give me access to sue a USB stick. The reason I ask is I can access the drive from dos prompt and I could copy files off the drive.

Fingers, the bootable disk you refer to, is it the same as the Linix boot disk trvlr is talking about?


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#16
October 22, 2014 at 14:06:54
Before I puleld out the hard drive, I went to dosprompt and ran a chkdsk. When it got to the end it said it found problems with the filesystem and to run a chkdsk with the /F option. I tried this but another process has a lock on the drive (the repair disc I assume). I guess this is where another bootable CD would help so I guess I need to know exactly what kind of bootable disk do I need?

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#17
October 22, 2014 at 18:07:42
so I connected the drive to another machine with a USB adapter, nut neither windows or dos could read it. If I clicked on the drive in Windows or tried to change to the drive in DOS I received something like 'invalid parameter. I have put the drive back in the faulty machine and downloading Ubuntu.

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#18
October 22, 2014 at 18:20:38
I could use also some instructions on how to use the ubuntu cd to get some files from the drive to a dvd. Thanks

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#19
October 22, 2014 at 18:46:30
Also someone asked about capturing the blue screen of death earlier. I haven't seen it in a while but next time I do I will try capture with my phone.

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#20
October 23, 2014 at 02:48:14
These links may be useful.

Note the first one clearly shows the screen that offers to install it to the hard drive, or simply "try" the OS. You use the "try" option.

http://tinyurl.com/cqhwasa

https://help.ubuntu.com/14.04/ubunt...


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#21
October 23, 2014 at 12:01:01
Okay those links didn't give me real clear instructions but here is what I have done. I have staretd up with the Ubuntu DVD and I got toa places window. I also attached a USB stick which I see there. However when I try to access the hard drive I get the following;

Unable to access S3A5801D002

error mounting /dev/sda2 at /media/ubuntu/S3A5801D002:Command line `mount -t ntfs -o "uhelper=udisks2,nodev,uid=999,gid=999,dmask=007,fmask=0177" "/dev/sda2" "/media/ubuntu/S3A5801D002"' exited with non-zero exit status 13: ntfs_attr_pread_i:ntfs_pread failed input/output error Fauiled to read NTFS $Bitmap: input/output error. It goes with some more with possible causes.

Suggestions?


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#22
October 24, 2014 at 11:47:20
Anyone got any other ideas. I am still stuck trying to recover the computer.

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#23
October 24, 2014 at 12:23:52
Confess I'm not familiar with the error message you post; nor likely what is amiss here... I'm wondering if per chance you acquired a pest or three.. With that in mind... may be worth to go a little hunting for anything nasty on the drive. Do NOT install anything to or reformat etc. the drive at this stage. Did you install anything immediately prior to the problem(s) arriving; any events prior?

If you were to replace the drive into its home computer, and then run a Kaspersky Rescue disk it may help... It's a long shot...

The Kaspersky Rescue disk is actually anti-virus disk which once loaded (again into RAM only) will go on-line to update itself. Then scan the system fully - if you opt to (and I would) and fix any nasties it finds...

http://support.kaspersky.co.uk/8093

is where to download the ISO. Burn it to a dvd and boot with the dvd.


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#24
October 24, 2014 at 13:05:10
This link discusses a repair installation routine - to some degree. If it's like the XP version then it's run NOT from within Recovery Console; but is an option that is later in the installation process. And if it is like the XP version - it will "not" (barring accidents) affect data area... meaning your personal files are (hopefully) OK.

http://tinyurl.com/lrsukm6

Note that you must an OEM version windows to repair an OEM original installation; and similarly a retail to repair an original retail installation. Also you use "your" current key in the process.

This link discusses running chkdsk from a booted Win 7 install DVD or flash drive. Scroll down a little to the appropriate message.

http://tinyurl.com/lnp3495

Remember that you need to use a copy of the OS that is the same as installed. Home with Home or Professional with Professional - not one with the other... 32 bit or 64 bit accordingly.

This is a specific Repair installation how to...

http://tinyurl.com/9mgsw73


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#25
October 24, 2014 at 13:42:10
Hi trvlr,

I am going through your post but I do have an update.

I am unable to run any virus scanner against the drive because when I attach it to another machine with a USB adapter, it cannot be read, either in windows or DOS.

However I have rebooted the faulty computer with the Windows 7 64 bit repair disc I created from another machine. It allows me to get to a DOS prompt and from here I am able to plug in a USB stick, and so far it looks like I am able to copy her documents off the drive to the USB stick. There is close to 2G but I will no shortly. It is curious how the drive can be read in this way on the bad machine, but can't on my own desktop using a USB adapter.

Does the unbuntu boot CD have any virus scanner on it?


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#26
October 24, 2014 at 14:36:36
I'm not sure... But the Kaspersky Rescue Disk is built around a Linux variant... Not sure which one but at least it ought to boot as well as any other Linux proper disk.

As you can recover files - albeit in a slightly unusual way... I would focus totally on file/data recovery/safeguarding for now.

Once all data has been secured... post back.

Also perhaps try the Kaspersky Rescue disk routine too.

There are ways to extract/discover the windows key for the installation - if you don't have it already. Usually it's on a sticker on the base of the laptop, or back of a desktop/tower system. That key is the one you would use to effect any repair installation routines. Likely it will have OEM included within it - as almost certainly the installation is an OEM - not Retail.


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#27
October 24, 2014 at 15:18:38
Will do trvlr.... thanks for your help. I only have a small stick and I am worried about connecting my external disk drive just in case the machine has a virus so it make take a bit.

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#28
October 24, 2014 at 15:31:48
mmm Wise precaution.. I would also scan any usb sticks too asap after you have copied files to them.

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#29
October 27, 2014 at 09:34:07
Hi trvlr,

I think I have all the data backed up. For someone who didn't know what data they had, they sure had a lot. My guess is the kids have been using the computer.

Anyway I tried a system restore point from the Windows repair disc and it tells me there aren't any. So any idea of what we should try now. I am going to check with my colleuge but I doubt she has done and system image backups. I do see a recovery partition on the drive so maybe we need to try that.

Oh I almost forgot, I will try the virus boot cd first. I seem to be able to navigate the entire tree so I am wondering if there a problem with the boot sector. Also the chkdsk did seem to indicate file system problems, but it would not let me run with the /F option.


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#30
October 27, 2014 at 10:30:10
Hi Trvlr,

the kapersky link you gave me seemed to go else where to try to get me to buy something so I did a good search. It seems the support number has changed. I booted with the kapersky cd, did an update and then ran a scan, but I am not sure if it is complete. I could not find the option to do a full scan. It only ran for a minute or two so I am guessing it was not a full scan.


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#31
October 27, 2014 at 10:39:00
It would be a full scan by default. I had a vague recollection that may have been an option to do otherwise.

It does take a wee while normally...

This is the usual download I go for; but often do post the other one as it has other possibly useful info for those who may need it..

http://www.kaspersky.com/virus-scanner

It is the Rescue Disk you're after at this time; and it is free.


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#32
October 27, 2014 at 10:47:39
Hi again,

I just went and looked at it again and I see on the screen that it shows two drives, sda1 and sda3, and these are what it seems to scan. Looking at the contents of the two drives, they look like they are virtual drives created by the Kapersky cd.

I have a browser on the cd. I was wondering if it would be worth to install and run trend micro's housecall scanner.


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#33
October 27, 2014 at 11:23:04
Not sure what that's all about (in haste just now). whenever I have run the Kaspersky disk it simply installs itself into RAM, goes on-line to update, then scans all drives/partitions it can find.

Try downloading the disk again from the link in my #31 above...

This is a very excellent guide on using the disk - all credit to the author/site...

http://tinyurl.com/373ojxb


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#34
October 27, 2014 at 12:46:18
Okay trying it again. I noticed looking at tinyurl.com I get a little different screens. I get the message to enter any key, go into graphics mode, and then have to press 1, 2, or 3. Maybe they changed this to a number based on the a/A problem mentioned in the instructions.

Next a dos type window display some messages and then I get a graphical dialogue box that says "mounting disks". This seems to run for quite a while. Once this is done I have to double click on the rescue disk icon. From here i do as the instructions suggest and do an update first. When it first starts up it gives me an operating system drop down list to choose from (windows setup or Windows 7). I choose Windows 7 and click okay.

Again as was in the first cd I see the drives I can can scan and they are;

Disk boot sectors
hidden startup objects
sda1
sda3

I don't see C: as the instructions show. It seems that this cd cannot mount the disk and assign a letter.


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#35
October 27, 2014 at 14:37:45
mmm Have to say things aren't looking too good at this stage... Ideally via a Linux boot disk (and Kaspersky uses that as a platform) one ought to be able to see the installed hard drives - and all its partitions - and so on.

Possibly a hard drive disk utility may help - at least indicate if the drive is OK or not...; which at present isn't looking too good.

What make hard drive do you have?


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#36
October 27, 2014 at 17:00:00
Sorry Trvlr, I had to go out and do some errands. The drive is a Toshiba. It is marked with HDD2H81 and MK6465FSX.

It's weird that I can read the contents of the drive when I go to dos prompt from the repair disc. It just seems it has lost its ability to be a boot disc.


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#37
October 27, 2014 at 17:13:22
If we are at the point of re-imageing, I have seen some docs about pressing 0 while you power on to get to a factory recovery

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#38
October 27, 2014 at 17:27:01
mmm that sounds like the boot/startup files may be screwed up...?

As you can boot to a dos prompt...

Once you have "all" personal files etc. safely copied off the drive... try the routine discussed here:

http://tinyurl.com/m6g998k

and this link has a slightly different approach but to the same end. You will have to scroll down some to the windows-7 section (passing beyond Easy Recovery Essentials (which is paid for utility which may also work (but if you can do it for free then why not?)

https://neosmart.net/wiki/fix-mbr/

This one is also very similar (this chaps tips are usually pretty solid...):

http://tinyurl.com/37abfsf

And another "how to"

http://www.thewindowsclub.com/repai...

But "first" ensure you have all critical personal files etc safely copied "off" the system as is; just in-case...

message edited by trvlr


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#39
October 27, 2014 at 22:36:19
I tried boorec /scanos. It came back with 0 windows installations identified. I next tried rebuildbcd . It also reported 0 windows installation identified. This is weird because before you get to the menu to click on command prompt, I get a window that says it found a Window 7 installaton on the C drive.

I then tried a bootrec /fixmbr and then tried to reboot the computer into windows. It still fails to load. Last option is /fixboot. When I run it, I get 'The volume does not contain a recognized file system'. Please make sure that all required file system drivers are loaded and the volume is not corrupted.


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#40
October 27, 2014 at 22:54:52
I tried the second link as well and tried the bootsect /nt60 SYS /mbr command, but I still can't get into Windows. I saw the blue screen again so I am trying to wait for it to ee if I can record it.

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#41
October 27, 2014 at 23:05:29
Trvlr,

I got the blue screen on my phone, but I won't be able to unload the video until I get to work. This is a work phone and the gear for it is in my office.


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#42
October 28, 2014 at 13:16:47
Hi trvlr,

The video with my camera was not good even after transferring to the computer so I am trying to decode it and type it here.

A problem has been detected and Windows has been shutdown to prevent damage to your computer.

UNBOOTABLE_BOOT_VOLUME

If this is the first time you've seen this Stop error screen, restart your computer. if this screen appears again, follow these steps:

Check to make sure any new hardware or software is properly installed. If this is a new installation ask your hardware or software manufacturer for any windows updates you might need.

If problems continue, disable or remove any newly installed hardware or software. Disable BIOS memory options such as cashing or shadowing. If you need to use safe mode to remove or disable components, restart your computer, press F8 to select Advanced startup options, and then select Safe Mode.

Technical information:

Too blurry to give an accurate reading.


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#43
October 28, 2014 at 13:21:04
On second look it says UNMOUNTABLE_BOOT_VOLUME

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#44
October 28, 2014 at 15:18:13
I tried running chkdsk from teh Windows repair disc. It says it can't because the volume is in use by another process. It says it can run if I unmount the volume but ALL OPENED HANDLES to this volume would then be invalid.I wasn't sure if I should say yes. I assume it is the repair disc that has a lock on it.

Also if I reply N it asks me if I want chkdsk to be scheduled next tiem the computer boots up. I tried this but it didn't work.


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#45
October 29, 2014 at 10:58:15
You still out there Trvlr?

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#46
October 29, 2014 at 12:40:56
Hi - sorry been out and about and was only across here via my bb which isn't the best at times for forums...

Have to say I'm out of ideas at this stage.. If you can boot up and get to a dos prompt... and then do see a windows directory... don't understand why it says can't find it when you run the boot utilities...

At this stage - as you have (I hope) by now saved all data etc off the system entirely...- perhaps time to take the more drastic step of a factory repair routine?

I have distant memories of reading about the first sector on a drive being damaged in way that rendered it unbootable... There was a somewhat "arcane" method to fool the drive into working again - I think it was in an excellent Mark Minasi tome on repairing computers (a lot of it way over head at the time).

A long shot and may have mentioned it earlier...? A windows 7 "repair installation" - which requires a full version of the OS; one that is the same flavour as your installation; OEM for OEM and retail for retail. This is not run from within recovery console...

This excellent article details a few ides and also includes the repair installation routine. It may be worth a read and try before going a factory restore path?

https://www.winhelp.us/non-destruct...

message edited by trvlr


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#47
October 29, 2014 at 15:33:08
✔ Best Answer
Thanks trvlr,

yes I see the window folder. In fact I replaced some of the dll's in the system32/drivers directory because when I boot into safe mode with command prompt it gets so far and stalls. I was thinking that maybe one of them was corrupted. However this didn't seem to help.

Great news!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!. Before I had to submit this I got back to looking at the machine and I was able to fix it. Here is what I did;

Using the Windows repair disk I got myself into dos prompt. Running the chkdsk was the last thing I was going to try before trying to recover or reinstalling windows. I mentioned before that it said it couldn't run it without unmounting the volume. Since I was at the end I decided to go ahead and say yes. I ran a chkdsk /r /f. It looked like it fixed a few things. I exited dos prompt and restarted the computer. It got a point where it said it was configuring windows. I took this as a good sign. When it finally completed and windows opened, there was a bucnh of apps open including Excel withoput 5 spread sheets. My guess was that someone shutfown the computer forcefully while windows updates were being applied.

Anyway it all looks good now.

I really want to thank you Trvlr for your guidance and suggestions. I was great having someone who had sugegstions on what to dio and to steer me in the right direction.


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#48
October 29, 2014 at 15:41:52
Good news... Well dun you for perservering and finally getting it to work again.

And thank youforposting "your" resolution.

Enjoy...


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#49
February 19, 2015 at 00:32:11
maybe this can helps

http://www.deskdecode.com/how-to-fix-bsod-unmountable-boot-volume-stop-0x000000ed/

message edited by johnybb


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