Solved Windows 7 System Image Restore (POST 2)

July 29, 2013 at 10:21:59
Specs: Windows 7, IntelCore 2 Duo E4500/4 GB RAM
I know it's been awhile (boy I'll say) since I posted follow-up information on this issue - http://www.computing.net/answers/wi... - but I have a very good excuse for that (thanks Super Storm Sandy). I'm settling in now and the very last thing I believe I tried was restoring from the "D" drive. I did that and still get the same message about the failed to extend or mount (0x80780124). At any rate, I power down and restart after the restore and start windows 7 normally and everything is ok. The reason I am doing restores is to try it out on purpose to make sure it works. What good can come from a backup if you don't try to restore? Same way with tape backups. You can have MANY tape backups but what good are they if you haven't tried to restore from a tape backup? Wouldn't you like to know if the image backup or the tape backup REALLY WORKS?

See More: Windows 7 System Image Restore (POST 2)

Report •

✔ Best Answer
July 30, 2013 at 16:30:52
NO, the "Create a System Image" is a feature that can create an image of the entire hard drive or just parts. You select. It is a good option to use. Best to image to an external hard drive. Possible to image to DVDR too but could take many disks, depending on what you are imaging.

I like to create an image of the drive without any programs installed but with Windows fully patched, all drivers installed and settings as you like them.

Then another image after all programs are installed. That image is actually 2 images because I install most programs on another drive or partition. That way if Windows changes but the programs don't, you only need to make a current image of the OS partition. The reverse is also true.

Just read the help files on system image.

The hidden partition found on OEM computers can be dated because is won't be current and only contains what came from the factory. That is a good image to use when you are disposing of an older computer. You generally don't want to dispose of an old computer with a full, newer version of Windows. So doing a factory restore makes the computer usable without giving up the version of Windows you bought.



#1
July 29, 2013 at 10:59:56
Did you create the restore set of disks already?

Report •

#2
July 29, 2013 at 11:17:45
Yes, absolutely. The restore CD sees the D drive as well as the Seagate FreeAgent external 500 GB drive.

Report •

#3
July 29, 2013 at 12:39:40
Then there is no reason to use the restore partition on the hard drive. I recommend you use Windows 7 to create restore files that are updated with all your programs, personal files, etc.

Save the restore set to use when you decide to dispose of the computer. You could now wipe the D partition and use the space for your own files.

Basically, the restore partition is only there for you to create your restore set. You should be able to test that set without actually finishing the restore. If the process starts you can be pretty certain you are good to go and can abort the restore.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
July 29, 2013 at 14:29:59
Thank you OtheHill:

Actually, the D drive is a separate hard drive (Seagate 1TB). My system holds 2 separate hard drives. I'm using the entire C drive as is; there is no additional partitions. The same for the separate D drive. That drive is being used as a whole drive with no additional partitions. I know, it's a storage thing. At any rate, my thought is to store a backup image of the C drive on the D and Seagate Free Agent external drive on different dates. One week, an image backup goes on the Seagate D drive, the next week will be the Free Agent just to be sure.

I don't know if this changes the answer to your previous response. Would like to know what procedures you would recommend.

Thanks again, OtheHill


Report •

#5
July 29, 2013 at 14:40:28
I was under the impression you had an OEM computer that came with an SLP version of Windows pre-installed and with a hidden restore partition on the main hard drive.

If you have something else that you made using a third party program then your problem may be due to the image has only the original version of 7 and you now have SP1 installed. Sometimes the restore balks then. Also, if hardware and drivers are different than the image.


Report •

#6
July 30, 2013 at 14:54:33
Hi OtheHill,
Yes, originally the Dell 530 Inspiron was purchased that way. There was a hidden recovery partition and could be accessed by pressing one of the Function keys on bootup. As time went on I outgrew it by upgrading hardware, installing software, upgrading from VISTA to Windows 7 Home Premium, downloading MP3 songs, etc. The recovery partition was erased eventually and I redistributed the left over hard drive space.

Sounds like you may be saying that the "Create a System Image" utility within Windows 7 might be an older version that was installed when I upgraded from VISTA. When MS sends out Windows Updates, don't they update everything?

message edited by StanGaris


Report •

#7
July 30, 2013 at 16:30:52
✔ Best Answer
NO, the "Create a System Image" is a feature that can create an image of the entire hard drive or just parts. You select. It is a good option to use. Best to image to an external hard drive. Possible to image to DVDR too but could take many disks, depending on what you are imaging.

I like to create an image of the drive without any programs installed but with Windows fully patched, all drivers installed and settings as you like them.

Then another image after all programs are installed. That image is actually 2 images because I install most programs on another drive or partition. That way if Windows changes but the programs don't, you only need to make a current image of the OS partition. The reverse is also true.

Just read the help files on system image.

The hidden partition found on OEM computers can be dated because is won't be current and only contains what came from the factory. That is a good image to use when you are disposing of an older computer. You generally don't want to dispose of an old computer with a full, newer version of Windows. So doing a factory restore makes the computer usable without giving up the version of Windows you bought.


Report •

Ask Question