Solved Windows 7 registry path information

July 1, 2017 at 09:42:53
Specs: Windows 7
Can a registry entry path include a file name and then a folder name? For example: File name ONBttnIE.dll\106 The 106 may be some kind of an environment variable.

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✔ Best Answer
July 1, 2017 at 16:55:10
"C:\ Program Files x86\Microsoft Office\root\Office16\ONBttnIE.dll\106" isn't a valid path, although the syntax is legal. It doesn't need to be. The registry and Regedit don't care what it is, seeing it as just a string of characters. The software that reads the registry value interprets it as a reference to the file "ONBttnIE.dll" which is a DLL. The 106 is an arbitrary number that identifies a resource within the DLL, possibly an icon. The value is of no significance and there is no way to tell from the path what it is referring to. The software knows what it is.

At least that is what it looks like. I have seen this kind of thing before.



#1
July 1, 2017 at 10:14:27
In the NTFS hierarchy a folder will always precede a file.

To display a full list of the environment variables, open a Run window (Windows Logo key+R), type cmd /k set (note the two spaces) and press Enter.


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#2
July 1, 2017 at 11:42:02
Thanks for your reply. I have an entry in the registry as follows: (default) C:\ Program Files (x86\Microsoft Office\root\Office16\ONBttnIE.dll\104 . What is the purpose of the 104? Have another path using 106. One may be for (x86) and the other for the 64 bit version. In the ONBttnIE.dll, was hoping the IE is for internet explorer. Internet explorer does not work 100% of the time. With the 104 or 106, is he computer able to find the file? Thank you for your help.

CoffeeBreak

message edited by CoffeeBreak


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#3
July 1, 2017 at 12:15:01
A number like "\104" is likely to be a pointer to an icon inside
the file. That doesn't mean there are at least 104 icons in it.
What is the name of the key that the file path is in? The name
may suggest what the path is for.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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#4
July 1, 2017 at 12:58:10
You shouldn't need to delve into file level or the registry. What are you intending to do with this file?
If there was a problem with the file then its hard to understand why it works sometimes.

ONBttnIE.dll is a Microsoft One Note IE Add-On. Temporarily disable the Add-On (or all Add-Ons) if you want to prove something.

Most likely you are hitting website issues but if you want to try something then run IE Reset. Go to "IE > Tools > Internet Options > Advanced > Reset button". Your Favorites will be kept. You will lose Add-Ons but they soon come back with usage if needed.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#5
July 1, 2017 at 14:22:54
Hi Jeff,

Here is the registry keys.

HKEY_Classes_Root\TypeLib\{3120BA9F-4FC8-4A4F-AE1E-02114F421D0A}\1.0\0\win32
(default) C:\ Program Files x86\Microsoft Office\root\Office16\ONBttnIE.dll\106
then
HKEY_Classes_Root\TypeLib\{B9164592-D558-4EE7-8B41-F1C9F66D683A}\1.0\0\win32
(default) C:\ Program Files(x86\Microsoft Office\root\Office16\ONBttnIE.dll\104
then
HKEY_Classes_Root\TypeLib\{3120BA9F-4FC8-4A4F-AE1E-02114F421D0A}\1.0\0\win64
(default) C:\ Program Files(x86\Microsoft Office\
VFS\ProgramFilesX64\MicrosoftOffice\
Office16\ONBttnIE.dll\106
then
HKEY_Classes_Root\TypeLib\{B9164592-D558-4EE7-8B41-F1C9F66D683A}\1.0\0\win64
(default) C:\ Program Files(x86\Microsoft Office\
VFS\ProgramFilesX64\MicrosoftOffice\
Office16\ONBttnIE.dll\104

Can see from the above that the 104 and 106 have nothing to do with whether they are win32 or win64. If I were to substitute DOS for 104 and Lotus for 106, we would know that we have folders, and I would bet the computer would not find the file.

Thanks for your help.
CoffeeBreak

message edited by CoffeeBreak


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#6
July 1, 2017 at 16:55:10
✔ Best Answer
"C:\ Program Files x86\Microsoft Office\root\Office16\ONBttnIE.dll\106" isn't a valid path, although the syntax is legal. It doesn't need to be. The registry and Regedit don't care what it is, seeing it as just a string of characters. The software that reads the registry value interprets it as a reference to the file "ONBttnIE.dll" which is a DLL. The 106 is an arbitrary number that identifies a resource within the DLL, possibly an icon. The value is of no significance and there is no way to tell from the path what it is referring to. The software knows what it is.

At least that is what it looks like. I have seen this kind of thing before.


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#7
July 1, 2017 at 18:13:39
Further to #4. If you create a shortcut with this target:
"C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe" -extoff
it will open IE without addons so it should not use ONBttnIE.dll.

It might help prove something.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#8
July 2, 2017 at 10:44:01
I don't have specific knowledge about this question, but it
looks like the Registry entries specify which icons should be
displayed to represent certain file types that are associated
with OneNote. The icons are stored in ONBttnIE.dll at
locations represented by the numbers 104 and 106.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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#9
July 2, 2017 at 16:08:08
Hi Derrek,

“You shouldn't need to delve into file level or the registry. What are you intending to do with this file?” I was trying to determine if the registry entry for C:\Program Files x86\Microsoft Office\root\Office16\ONBttnIE.dll\106 was working with the “106". I was considering it to be a folder name. I intend to keep the registry entry as is and not to mess with the file location on the hard drive. I agree, in a perfect world, we should have to be concerned with file level or the registry. But I have used the registry editor for several years. Don’t change the registry if you do understand why it is necessary!

The short cut to internet explorer, I can manage the add-on from within the application. Go to tools, drop down list, then click on “Manage add-ons.” Shockwave Flash Object (Adobe) and XLM DON Document (Microsoft) could be disabled.

Derrek, I thank you for all your help.

CoffeeBreak


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#10
July 2, 2017 at 16:38:11
Hello LMiller7 and Jeff Root,

Thank you for all your help. I sure did not know that that 104 and 106 would be icon information. Your time and effort is appreciated.

CoffeeBreak


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#11
July 2, 2017 at 16:41:56
What I was attempting to address in my responses was this bit in #2 as I thought it was the reason you were going to the registry and looking at the file:
"Internet explorer does not work 100% of the time"

Yes, with most things computer there are several ways to do things. The shortcut was suggested in case you wanted to disable all the add-ons in one go, but sure, you can equally well tackle them individually.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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